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Examples of National Register Nominations

The following National Register nomination examples include properties that have been listed on the National Register of Historic Places for local significance. Due to the age of some nominations, these examples may not include all current requirements for National Register nominations. For additional examples, please contact the National Register Coordinator, Elizabeth Foster Hill at Beth.Foster@iowa.gov or 515.281.4137.

Homes

Charles Henry and Charlotte Norton House

Charles Henry and Charlotte Norton House is listed on the National Register of Historic Places under Criterion C as a distinguished design combining the Italian Villa and Gothic Revival styles. There is no comparable example of this combination to such a degree in the Avoca area.

Roland and Marilyn Wehner House

Constructed in 1959, with a bedroom wing built in 1964, the Roland and Marilyn Wehner House is locally significant and individually eligible under Criterion C as a master's work that reflects the deep influence of Frank Lloyd Wright at midcentury and Wright's principles of modular, affordable, and organic design. Designed by and for the architect himself, the residence was Roland C. Wehner's first opportunity to plan and execute a Wrightian design after his graduation from architectural school and upon joining the firm of an older, established Iowa City architect.

Jean and Inez Bregant House

The Jean and Inez (Lewis) Bregant house (1912) has local criterion B significance as the home of "Council Bluffs' well known little couple," also known as the "Candy Kids" during their association with the Woodward Candy Company, Criterion A significance as the best remaining resource associated directly with the John G. Woodward and Company, and local Criterion C significance as a fine example of a small Craftsman/Bungalow design that was built to suit the unique needs of the owners. The period of significance is 1912 (date of construction) to 1969 (the death of Inez Bregant).

Commercial Buildings

Maquoketa Company—Clinton Machine Company

The Maquoketa Company—Clinton Machine Company Administration Building is individually listed on the National Register under Criterion A as a tangible link to Clinton Machine Company, one of the world’s largest manufacturers of small engines and one of Iowa’s largest employers of the 1950s. It is also significant under Criterion C as an important local example of the Art Moderne style, designed and built by C.A. Depue, the president of the Maquoketa Company.

Iowa Wind Mill and Pump Company Office and Warehouse

The Iowa Wind Mill and Pump Company Office and Warehouse is locally significant under Criterion A for its association with the industrial history of the west side of Cedar Rapids. It is one of two extant historic pump companies that played an important role in Cedar Rapids' industrial history, particularly in their role in Iowa's agricultural development. The property is also locally significant under Criterion C for its architectural significance as a comparatively well preserved example of an early 1900s industrial building in Cedar Rapids' industrial core. The extant building is the only surviving building from the complex of buildings once associated with the Iowa Wind Mill and Pump Company. This large, three-story masonry building is an example of the industrial progress of this company and of Cedar Rapids in general at the beginning of the twentieth century.

Sokol Gymnasium

The Sokol Gymnasium is located in the central section of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, on the east side of the Cedar River. The building has long been a vital part of the Czech community in Cedar Rapids. The building is locally significant under Criterion A because of its long and direct association with this important ethnic-based gymnastic and social organization. The Sokol Gymnasium is also locally significant under Criterion C as a well preserved example of a Classical Revival commercial building within the body of work by master architect, Charles A. Dieman.

Englert Theatre

The Englert Theatre is locally significant under Criterion A as a cultural landmark and downtown amusement venue known to generations of Iowa City residents and University of Iowa students. It is also significant as a combination performance and movie theater under Criterion C as the last intact example of this property type in lowa City.

Schools

For information on evaluating and nominating your historic school, please visit our Historic Schools web pages.

Sumner School

Located in Franklin Township northwest of Mount Vernon in Linn County, Iowa, Sumner School is locally significant under Criteria A and C. Under Criterion A, the school is historically significant for its association with the earliest period in the development of the Iowa and Linn County public school systems. Built circa 1858, this one-room brick schoolhouse served this rural Linn County district for nearly eight decades. The Sumner School is also locally significant under Criterion C because it embodies the distinctive characteristics of an antebellum one-room rural district school built in a vernacular expression of the Greek Revival style using locally-made brick.

Highlandville School

The Highlandville School is eligible for the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) under Criteria A and C for its local significance. The Highlandville School is associated with educational pursuits at the National and State levels (through legislative efforts) and at the local level as a way to educate rural Highland Township youth. Constructed in 1911, the building is a well intact example of how rural residents provided educational opportunities to students in an area of low population. This school is also eligible for the NRHP under Criterion C as a well-preserved and unusual example of rural schoolhouse architecture specifically designed for the needs of the village of Highlandville.

Roosevelt School

This building achieves local significance under Criterion C of the National Register Criteria because it is a notable example of late Victorian Romanesque architecture. The High School is also locally significant because it is a well-preserved example of the work of Josiah Rice. It was the Public Library from the time of its construction until the Carnegie Library was opened two and one half blocks away in 1904.

Churches

Ingemann Danish Evangelical Lutheran Church and Cemetery

The Ingemann Danish Evangelical Lutheran Church and Cemetery is locally significant under Criterion A for the historical significance of this rural church in the religious life of the Danish immigrant community in the vicinity of the town of Moorhead in Monona County and in its representation of the split in the Danish Lutheran Church in 1894. It is also considered historically significant for the fact that this church represents an example of the Grundtvigian congregation retaining the historic church building after the split and the Inner Mission members leaving to build a new church elsewhere in the neighborhood. The church is also locally significant under Criterion C as a well-preserved example of a rural frame church built by Danish immigrants and reflecting their craftsmanship and their ethnic heritage. The addition of the oversized tower to the front of the church in 1904 further reflects a Danish design tradition for rural churches in Denmark and seen in other Danish immigrant settlements in Iowa and the United States.

Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church

The church is significant under Criterion A as the oldest historically black church in the city. Criterion Consideration A applies since the church derives its primary significance from its historical importance. The church, provided a physical venue for its members to meet, socialize, and form a kinship of strength in the face of local prejudice, in addition to and as an integral part of the congregation's religious aspirations.

Hotels

Hotel Ottumwa

The Hotel Ottumwa (1917) is locally significant under Criterion A for its role in the social history and the commercial development of Ottumwa. It was built as a first class hotel and held that position in the community for decades. The seven storefronts offered prime, highly visible, retail space, and, for over six decades housed the office of the Ottumwa Chamber of Commerce. The Hotel Ottumwa has local Criterion C significance as a good example of a hotel design in the popular Classical Revival style by the premier architectural firm in Iowa during the first half of the twentieth century, Proudfoot, Bird and Rawson of Des Moines. It also contains a work of art by one of the foremost twentieth century American mural painters, Daniel MacMorris of Kansas City.

Sexton Hotel

Constructed of brick in 1906-07, and incorporating an earlier frame building as a dining room wing, the hotel is locally significant under Criterion A for its strong associations with commerce and the provision of lodging and dining services, and with two major chapters in transportation history. By twice locating his businesses in Stuart, Iowa, across the street from the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific's tracks and its 1879 brick depot, hotel owner John P. Sexton aimed to capture the passenger trade from the trains that daily rumbled through town as well as serve the general public in his dining room.

Cemeteries

Oakhill Cemetery

The Oak Hill Cemetery Historic District is locally significant under Criterion A for the historical significance of the cemetery and its representation of the settlement and development of the City of Cedar Rapids. It is further significant under Criterion A for its association with families and individuals who played an important role in the settlement and development of the city. Additional significance under Criterion A is achieved through the representation of the social history of the city including race relations, the role of women, and the role of immigrant groups in Cedar Rapid’s history. The cemetery is also significant under Criterion C for its association with the Rural Cemetery Movement. The cemetery is further significant under Criterion C for its representation of the work of landscape architects, Horace W.S. Cleveland and Ossian C. Simonds. The work of the Cedar Rapids' architectural firm of Josselyn and Taylor also added substantially to the architectural significance of the cemetery by the addition of the monumental stone gateway and shelter house.

Historic Districts

Lucas County Courthouse Square Historic District

The Lucas County Courthouse Square Historic District has local Criterion A significance as sixty of the seventy-six resources within the district speak directly to the impact of being the Lucas County seat on commercial development between the years 1867 and 1963. The district also has local Criterion C significance as a good collection of commercial buildings representative of the types, styles and building materials commonly used between 1867 and 1963, and demonstrates the evolution of building types during this period.

Washington Downtown Historic District

The Washington Downtown Historic District is locally significant under Criterion A for its key role in the commercial history and development of Washington, Iowa, and locally significant under Criterion C for its excellent collection of local commercial architecture. Collectively, the buildings represent historic commercial architecture combined with upper level offices or residences, updated with changing trends in the 20th century. The buildings in the Washington Downtown Historic District represent the largest and most significant collection and concentration of commercial buildings in Washington.

Woodbine Lincoln Highway and Brick Street Historic District

The Woodbine Lincoln Highway and Brick Street Historic District, located in Woodbine, Harrison County, Iowa, is locally significant under Criterion A in the areas of commerce and transportation as an example of the strong influence each element had on the development of the other. The section of brick paving along the original route of the Lincoln Highway in Woodbine has statewide significance as the longest extant section of brick paving on this route in Iowa. The Woodbine Lincoln Highway and Brick Street Historic District is also significant under Criterion C in the area of Architecture as a broad collection of representative architectural styles and construction methods found in small town architecture between 1878 and 1967.

Moved Resources

Modale School and Masonic Hall

The Modale School and Masonic Hall, located in the town of Modale in Harrison County, Iowa, is locally significant under Criteria A and C. Under Criterion A, the building is significant for its association with the development of Modale's public school system. Built in 1880, the school functioned as part of the Taylor Township sub-district as school No. 3. The building is also significant under Criterion A for its association with the Masonic lodge and its reflection of the importance of this fraternal society to the social history of Modale and Harrison County. The Modale School and Masonic Hall is further significant under Criterion C because it represents a comparatively rare survival of a wooden-frame 1880 school building in the county and the State of Iowa. The building was moved twice in its history, with its original location at the north end of Main Street, its second site at the south end of Main Street, and its third and current site.

Dunleith Dubuque Bridge

As one of the first bridges to span the Mississippi River, constructed at a time in which railroads were opening the West to settlement, the Dunleith and Dubuque Bridge was one of Iowa's-and the country's-most historically significant early spans. Andrew Carnegie grandly characterized the structure as "the most important railway bridge that had been built up to that time.". Dubuque benefitted tremendously from the commerce attracted by the bridge.

Others

Bandshell Park

The Bandshell Park Historic District in Ames includes both the bandshell and the park in which it was built. It was listed on the National Register under Criterion A as a municipal park improved in the 1930s to serve as a music facility, and under Criterion C for its architectural significance.

John and Mary Jane Kyte Farmstead District

The John and Mary Jane Kyte Farmstead District is significant under National Register Criterion C for its architectural significance as a well-preserved early settlement era farmstead. The house and barn date from the 1850s and 1860s and the period of significance extends to 1901, which represents the period John Kyte owned the farmstead.

Daniel McConn Barn

The Daniel McConn Barn, constructed in 1857, was individually listed on the National Register of Historic Places under Criterion C for its architectural significance as a well-preserved banked/basement, double-decker, Pennsylvania-type barn.

Camp Harlan / Camp McKean Historic District

The Camp Harlan / Camp McKean Historic District is nominated under Criterion A at a statewide level of significance for its role as a Civil War rendezvous camp in Henry County, known first as Camp Harlan for the Fourth Iowa Cavalry and later as Camp McKean for the 25th Iowa Infantry, and under Criterion C at a local level of significance for the significant architecture of the springhouse. It is the only identified extant brick springhouse to date in southeast Iowa, and it is one of two identified in Iowa. Water from the springhouse was utilized by soldiers in camp, and names/initials remain etched in the stones above the inlet for the spring. A portion of the Swan Farm was utilized as a Civil War rendezvous camp, apparently leased to the government by Hugh B. Swan. Two brick buildings remain on the property from this period, the Swan House and the springhouse.

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