Stereo Photographers, A-Z

 

 

A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

 

INTRODUCTION

 

This directory of Iowa stereo photographers is based on extensive research over many years, a process that is on-going and never-ending.  More complete biographical information, evidence of expanded activities and studio locations, and more precise dates for these photographers are documented within the research files of the State Historical Society of Iowa.  While thousands of photographers operated studios in Iowa, the information in this directory focuses only on those who practiced stereo photography, approximately 360 individuals.

 

The dates, and even the names, of the photographers are taken from various sources, and these sources may contradict each other.  Many photographers spent a few years in one town and moved on, a phenomenon almost impossible to fully document.  A photographer may have visited several towns within one decade.

 

Likewise, partnerships may have lasted only a few years, and an individual might form a joint venture more than once.  In some instances, images were created by the individual photographer even if distributed under the name of a partnership.  The directory attempts to identify those professionals who actually set up studios or announced their services in city directories or advertisements.  It does not include all of the photographers' assistants, whether family member or hired help.

 

By nature, the directory is selective due in part to the scarcity of historical records.  Attempts were made to authenticate information or reconcile variances by identifying multiple sources to confirm or verify facts.  Nonetheless, the spelling of the photographers' names on the stereographs themselves varied.  The company that made the mounts or the local printer who hand-set type often made errors in the spelling of the photographer's name or even that of the town itself.  The inconsistencies in style and presentation between photographers, or even within one photographer's career, mean many cards lack any imprints or labeling.

 

Photographers sometimes identified the town in which they worked on the side or back of the stereograph, while others used their imprint to advertise series of stereo views for sale.  They ventured far from the studio, as indicated by the backlists and hand labeling of images.  Some may have set up branch studios that they only visited on certain days or, less frequently, brought their photo wagon or temporary studio to town.  The towns and dates listed in the directory are based more on printed sources than on information from the stereographs themselves.

 

Without specifically citing all of the sources used in compiling this list, basic research for this directory relied upon county histories, newspapers, advertisements, city directory listings, atlases, census records, and biographical files.  Confirmations came through additional research conducted by JoAnn Burgess and direct examination of the Juhl collection of Iowa stereographs.  Members of the National Stereoscopic Association constantly report “sightings” and research findings, which has resulted in the national directory of stereo photographers created by Darrah and Treadwell.

 

Although at present our knowledge is primarily limited to nineteenth-century photographers, research into the lives of Iowa photographers continues.  JoAnn Burgess is compiling a directory of Iowa photographers that will reach beyond the scope of this directory of Iowa stereo photographers.  About ten percent of the photographers working in Iowa before 1900 made stereographs and the images in Iowa Stereographs:  Three-Dimensional Visions of the Past (1997) offers a rare sample of their work.


KEY

 

Knowledge of the following terms and phrases will be helpful to the reader in better understanding the biographical data in this directory.

 

Stereograph sizes:

The mount of the stereograph is the hard cardboard backing on which the dual images have been applied by the photographer.

 

Stereo size refers to the mount on which the two images have been pasted.  The standard size is 3 and 1/2 inches by 7 inches and all, unless otherwise indicated, are of this size.

 

Cabinet Size refers to the mount of stereographs that are larger than the standard stereo size.  Cabinet size mounts are 4 inches by 7 inches.

 

Oversize refers to a mount that is larger than 4 inches by 7 inches.

 

Curved mount refers to a mount that is slightly curved for better dimensional viewing, usually on dark gray mounts.

 

 

Research sources:

 

N. S. A. refers to the National Stereoscopic Association and specifically to a book by T. K. Treadwell and William C. Darrah entitled, Stereographers of the World (1994).  This utilized research done by the authors and other members of the association in an attempt to list all known stereo photographers.

 

Darrah refers to William Darrah, early stereograph collector and writer; whose works include The World of Stereographs (1977) is the recognized expert in the field.  Working methodically, Darrah seldom recorded the name of a photographer unless he had actually seen an example of their work.  When Darrah’s name appears as a citation, one can be sure that this photographers work has been seen and recorded.

 

Burgess refers to research done on 19th century Iowa photographers by Jo Ann Burgess in a yet unpublished manuscript that identifies Iowa photographers by name, partnership, dates of studios, and towns.

 

SHSI refers to the State Historical Society of Iowa.  Located in Des Moines and Iowa City, negatives of the stereographs mentioned are available to researchers.

 

 

Other terms:

 

Pirated view refers to a stereograph that contains an image made from another photographer's negative.  These were often views of other parts of the United States or the world and were placed on mounts containing the name of the Iowa photographer.

 

Carte-de-visite refers to a single image photo card measuring 2 and 1/2 by 4 inches.  Stereographs were not made in this size.

 

Unmarked refers to the fact that the photographer's name does not appear on the stereograph.

 

Backlists refers to the names and numbers of other stereographs in a series.  This was done as an advertising tool to encourage the purchase of additional views.  The listing of other views available in the series was placed on the back of the mount.

 

Series numbers refers to numbers placed on the front or the back of the mount.  One can see by the number how many views have possibly been created by this particular photographer in at least that series.

 

“(year) +” refers to the fact that the photographer worked up to this year and possible beyond

 

Embossed mount refers to the pressing of the photographers name and address into the mount itself.  This was unusual but was done by some photographers.

 

“Name may have been....” refers to the fact that often mistakes were made on mount printing and misspelling of the photographer's name and address did occur.

 


A

 

ADAMS, ASA W. (1842–1915)

       Adams had a studio in Decorah, Winneshiek County.  A prominent series was “Snow Views.”  The backlist on this series shows seventeen views “on the Iowa & Dacotah Division of the M. and St. P. R. R. between Calmar and Charles City, Iowa, taken on Mar. 3d, 4th & 5th, 1873.”  He further advertised on the back of the card that “copies can be had for twenty–five cents each”.  At one time, he had a partnership called Adams & Shear in Decorah in the 1860s, but there are no known stereographs from this partnership.

       According to the Decorah Republican, November 18, 1915:  “Mr. Adams was born February 26, 1842, at Sheffield, Ohio, and came to Iowa when quite young.  He learned the photographer’s business at McGregor when he was twenty-one years of age and then came to Decorah and established a business that he carried on here for twenty-one years, when he moved with his family to Waterloo and opened a studio which he operated until his health failed some fifteen years ago.  For several years after he disposed of his business he continued to do special photographic work which did not tax his strength.  On November 28, 1866, he married Emma J. Fuller who survives him.  To this union four children were born.”  He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer.  His Decorah business was purchased by O. E. Borlaug.  He was buried back in Decorah on November 11, 1915.  (See also History of Winneshiek and Allamakee Counties, Iowa, 1882, p. 548.)

       There are eleven examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection, all of local Decorah views of which five are of the “Snow Views” series.

 

ADAMS, GEORGE H.

       Adams had a studio in Walnut, Pottawattamie County, in the 1880s and 1890s.  He was also, according to Burgess, in Avoca in 1880, in Lewis in 1883, and in Griswold in 1883–1897.  These were probably branch studios in some of the neighboring towns or towns that he regularly visited for photographic work.  There are no views by Adams in the SHSI but some have been seen by members of the NSA with Walnut as the town of origin.  Two rare views have been reported on cabinet mounts.  Adams used the term “Artist” on the mounts.

 

ADAMS, W. G.

       The NSA (Darrah) supplied the name of this photographer.  It is thought that W. G. Adams worked in Waterloo in the 1880s.  Members of the NSA (Darrah) have seen a view.  No other information is as yet available on Adams, and no known examples of his work are in the SHSI.

 

ADDIS, ALFRED S.

       The NSA believes that Addis worked in Silver City, New Mexico; Santa Barbara, California; Los Cruces and Lake Valley, New Mexico; as well as in Dubuque, Iowa.  He is thought to have died in El Paso, Texas, in 1886.  Thought to have been in San Francisco in 1865, so unsure of when he may have been in Dubuque.  He is not in the Dubuque city directories.  Information exists on his work in the western states, but no information has been located about his time in Iowa.

 

ALLEN

       Little information has been found concerning Allen.  Had partnership as Chatfield and Allen, and it is thought that the stereographs bore this name.  Members of the NSA (Darrah) have seen at least one example.  It is thought the partnership existed in Keokuk in the 1870s.

 

ANSCHUTZ, HERMAN M. (1869–?)

       Anschutz had a studio in Keokuk, Lee County, throughout the 1890s, 1900s, and 1910s.  The History of Lee County Iowa, 1914, vol. 2, pp. 111–112, states:  “Herman M. Anschutz, son of Friedolin Anschutz, was born in Keokuk, November 2, 1869, and the public school of the city afforded him his educational privileges.  When quite young he took up the study of photography under the direction of his brother-in-law George Hassall, and subsequently he purchased the business and has since been alone.  He is today at the head of the largest photographic establishment in the state and the work done in his gallery is of superior order.  In 1910, he built his present fine studio, which is splendidly equipped with all the modern facilities and accessories that make for efficient, high-grade art.  Possessing himself an artistic temperament, he readily recognizes the value of light and shade, of pose and of all the other things that feature as scientific forces in producing the best photographic results.  In 1903, Mr. Anschutz was married to Miss Grace C. Smith, a daughter of John Smith, a pioneer settler of Lee County, and they have two children, Adelaide and John.  The parents are members of the Methodist Church and Mr. Anschutz also holds membership in the Masonic fraternity.  In these two associations are found the rules which govern his conduct and the principles which guide him in every relation of life.  He is a man of noble purpose, commanding the respect and confidence of all who know him.  In private life, as in his professional career, he stands for the highest efficiency obtainable.  In the field of photography he has won a most enviable reputation, his studio largely setting the standard of photographic art in this state.”

       Examples of this photographer's stereographic work have been seen by members of the NSA (Darrah).  His work was mainly done in the first decades of the twentieth century.  He had a partnership as Hassall and Anschutz.  No known stereographs from this partnership.

 

ARAAH, PROF. ANTHEONIA

       Araah had a studio in Oxford Junction, Jones County, from 1876 to 1904, and stereographs produced probably bear this city's name.  He was also said to have had branch studios in the following places near Oxford Junction: Onslow (1880–1882), Maquoketa (1882), Garfield (1884), and Monticello (1887).  According to Burgess, there was also an M.A. Araah in Oxford Junction (1876–1904).  Antheonia Araah is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as being in Oxford Junction at that time.

       Views by this photographer have been seen by the NSA (Darrah), and one of his views from, perhaps Oxford Junction, is in the SHSI collection.

 

ARMSTRONG, C. M.

       Members of the NSA report having seen a single rare view by this photographer.  It is thought he worked in the 1870s.  He worked in Leon in Decatur County.  Nothing else is known at this time.

 

ARMSTRONG, SAMUEL MC DOWEL (1849–1923)

       Armstrong's studio was in Washington, Washington County, in the 1880s and 1890s.  From Portrait and Biographical Album, Washington Co., Iowa, 1887, p. 428:  “Samuel M. Armstrong, photographer, Washington, was born Oct. 1, 1849, in Allegheny County Pa, and is the son of David H. and Leticia (Melville) Armstrong.  Soon after the birth of Samuel, the family moved to Louisville, Kentucky, and from that place to Washington, this state, in 1856, where our subject grew to manhood, and where he has since continued to reside with the exception of about two years.  In his boyhood and youth Samuel Armstrong attended the public schools of Washington, and for a time assisted his father at the mason's trade.  About 1868 he went into the gallery of A. Kracaw to learn the trade of a photographer, which he mastered in all its details and in 1873 purchased a half interest in the business which he continued for one year, when he sold out and went to Springfield, Missouri, where he purchased a gallery, and resided one year.  He then returned to Iowa and located at Fairfield, where he also remained one year.  Returning to Washington in 1878, he purchased the old gallery then being run by M. W. Owen, where he has since continued having established a trade second to but few galleries, even in larger cities.  Photography, which has from the beginning been classed among the trades, is now beginning to be ranked among the professions, and not without reason.  Not only mechanical skills, but artistic taste, is now required of a first class photographer.  To meet the requirements it is necessary for one to study and experiment, that perfection may be attained.  That Mr. Armstrong is studious, that he is abreast with the times, a glance at his work will attest.  Every new improvement in his line is adopted, and as a consequence he has the trade of which mention has been made.  Samuel M. Armstrong and Miss Alice May Yearick were united in marriage Dec. 10, 1873.  She is a native of Knox County, Ohio, born Nov. 19, 1852, and is a daughter of Henry E. and Mary Yearick.  Mrs. Armstrong came with her parents to Washington in 1855, here grew to womanhood, and has here since continued to reside.  She is a lady of refinement and intelligence and is to her husband truly a helpmate.  Both of them are members of the Presbyterian Church, and do their part in sustaining the cause in Washington.  Mr. Armstrong has been a member of the choir for many years.  He is also a Member of Washington Lodge No. 26, AF & AM and politically is a Republican.”  He is listed as being a photographer in Washington in the 1881 Gazetteer.

       The NSA supplied the name of this photographer, and there are no stereographs by Armstrong in the SHSI collection.  NSA reports seeing six rare views on cabinet mounts.

 

ATHERTON, ALBERT CARL

       Atherton had his studio in Charles City, Floyd County, in the 1890s.  Also, according to Burgess, he may have been in Cedar Falls during that period.  The name of Atherton as a stereographer was supplied by the NSA (Darrah).  There are none of his stereographs in the SHSI, and no biographical data are known at this time.

 

ATKINSON, CHARLES A.

       Atkinson had a studio in Davenport, Scott County, in the 1860s.  A single view has been reported by NSA members of a boat on a river.  No other information is known concerning his work.

 

back to top

 

B

 

BABCOCK, WARNER D.

       Babcock had a studio in Grinnell, Poweshiek County, in the 1880s.  According to Burgess, he may have also had studios in Union (1880) and Marengo (1884).  The only known stereographs by Babcock are of the 1882 Grinnell tornado, and a hand-numbered series indicates at least twelve views in this series.  All of these views are in the SHSI collection, and all are from his Grinnell studio.

 

BACON, GEORGE

       The name of Bacon was supplied by the NSA (Darrah).  They thought he worked in the 1870s.  There is one example that is possibly of his work in the SHSI collection but a photographer named George A. Bacon also worked in Pekin, IL.  This could have been the previous residence of this same photographer.  The view may or may not have been taken in Iowa.  It is a birds-eye-view of the business area of the town.

 

BAGLEY, W. E.

       Bagley had a studio in Emmetsburg, Palo Alto County.  It is thought his studio existed in the 1880s.  Burgess lists a E. W. Bagley in Dyersville, Dubuque County, in 1876.  There is one example of his work in the SHSI collection (of Emmetsburg) and a view from his studio on Main Street in Dyersville has also been seen.  It is of the residence of John J. Robins, Esq. In 1880.

 

BAKER, JAMES GEDDES (1868–?)

       Baker had a studio in Columbus Junction, Louisa County, in the early 1890s.  Prominent series were the Chautauqua Series (1904) and the train wreck (1905).  In the History of Louisa County Iowa, vol. II, 1911, pp. 101–102, it is recorded:  “James Geddes Baker, who is successfully engaged as a photographer at Columbus Junction, was born in Louisa County March 12, 1868, a son of Benjamin Stephen and Nancy Agnes (Wykert) Baker.  The father was a native of New York state and the mother of West Virginia, later becoming a resident of Louisa County in 1835.  Mr. Baker, Sr., was a carpenter but during the later years of his life devoted his attention to farming.  He died in 1882, the mother being called away three years later.  They were the parents of two children: Benjamin Franklin, who is now living in Louisa County, and James Geddes.  In 1895, Mr. Baker was married to Miss Clara Elizabeth Grafe, a daughter of Theodore and Elizabeth Grafe.  Mrs. Baker died in the fall of 1898, leaving a son, James Walter, who was born in February of the same year.  On May 11, 1907 Mr. Baker was again married, the lady of his choice being Miss Bessie Forbes, a daughter of William C. and Henrietta (Kincaid) Forbes.  Politically, Mr. Baker is an earnest supporter of the Republican Party and fraternally is connected with the Odd Fellows and the Fraternal Aid Society.  Mrs. Baker attends the Reformed Church.”

       Thirty views by Baker are in the SHSI collection.  Some are from the train wreck series and some from the Chautauqua series.  The numbers on these series number into the 100s so both series may have been quite large.

 

BAKER, W.

       The name of Baker as a Marshalltown photographer was supplied by the NSA (Darrah).  Members had seen examples and believed he worked in the 1870s.  No examples of his work are available through the SHSI, and no biographical data are available at this time.

 

BALDWIN, CASSIUS M. (1848–?)

       Baldwin had a studio in Des Moines, Polk County, in the 1870s to the 1890s.  Had partnership called Baldwin and Daughtery.  Was also known to have been photographer in Santa Cruz, California.  The History of Polk County, Iowa, 1880, p. 768, provided the following sketch:  “Baldwin, C. M. Proprietor of the Capital City Art Gallery, corner of East Walnut and Fifth Streets.  Mr. Baldwin is a native of Indiana, having been born in Grant County, that state, January 27, 1848.  There he resided until he was 17 years of age when his father removed to Michigan, where he resided some two years, when he came to Iowa, locating in Marshall County.  During the time he resided in that county he was engaged in agricultural pursuits.  In 1874 he came to Des Moines and for some four years was in the employ of M. C. Lewis.  In October, 1878, he bought Mr. Lewis out and has since been conducting the business, having large and commodious rooms on the northeast corner of East Walnut and Fifth.  He was united in marriage to Mrs. L. J. Atkinson, a native of Ohio, December 25, 1876.  Have buried two children: Ella and Stella.”  Baldwin is also listed in the 1881 Gazetteer so was working in Des Moines at that time.  One of Baldwin's back stamps advertised, “Publisher of fine stereoscopic views of Des Moines, Iowa, and vicinity, interior and exterior of Iowa's capitol.  Also Colorado and the Mountains.”  On these he listed his town to be East Des Moines, Iowa.  A backlist on one card has fifty-four views listed in a series called “Series of Clear Creek Canon.”  All views in this series are of western (Colorado and Idaho) views except number 54 and that is called the “New State House, Des Moines, Iowa.”  There are thirty-two views in the SHSI collection and most of these show the interior and exterior of the state capitol.  There are also six views by the partnership of Baldwin & Daugherty, also listing an East Des Moines address and showing exterior views of the capitol.  Most of Baldwin's work seems to have been done on the cabinet size mounts.  There are no Colorado views in the SHSI collection.

 

BARBER, EARL (1852–1896)

       No other information is available on this photographer.  The NSA (Darrah) supplied his name as they had seen at least one view by him.  They felt he worked in Waterloo in the 1870s.

 

BARKE, J. F.

       Had studio called the Excelsior Gallery in Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie County, in the 1880s.  The studio was on First Avenue, between Fifth and Pearl Streets.  A prominent series was “Views of Council Bluffs and Vicinity.”  He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as a photographer in Council Bluffs.  He is also listed by the NSA as having a studio in Missouri Valley, Harrison County, in the 1880s.  He may have also produced stereographs using this city as the place of origin.

       The SHSI collection has four views by Barke in Council Bluffs.  They are from the “Views of Council Bluffs and Vicinity” series and feature local views such as the First National Bank and the high school building.  The name may have also been printed as Barks.

 

BARNARD, ALONZO A.

       Barnard has a studio in Waukon, Allamakee County, in 1880s and 1890s.  Had partnership as Huffman & Barnard.  He was the son-in-law of his partner, P. C. Huffman, having married Huffman’s daughter, Della.  His brother, Thomas Nathan Barnard, went to Idaho and produced stereographs there.

       Three views by Huffman & Barnard are part of the SHSI collection.  These show local views such as the Catholic church interior and a Mississippi River view.  No known stereographs by Barnard alone are known to exist.

 

BARNES, HARVEY C.

       Barnes had a studio in West Liberty, Muscatine County.  There is an example of his work in the SHSI.  He was in a partnership called Jacoby & Barnes and the SHSI collection includes four views by this partnership.  According to Burgess, he was active in the years around 1892.  This may be the same Barnes that is listed as being in Newton.

 

back to top

 

BARNES

       Barnes had a studio in Newton, Jasper County.  There was a partnership called Barnes and Kennedy.  It is unclear whether this is the same photographer that was in West Liberty.  The name of Barnes in Newton was supplied by the NSA and they felt he was working there in the 1870s.  They report having seen a single view of a farmhouse.

 

BARNETT, L. M. G.

       Barnett was said to have had studio in Davenport, Scott County.  Burgess also thought he was in Des Moines in the 1860s and 1870s.  She also lists a S. M. G. Barnett in Des Moines in 1865.  This name was seen in the Directory of Civil War Photographers.  The Barnett name is not listed, however, in any available Davenport city directory as a photographer.  The NSA members report having seen at least a single view of a city building.  They also felt he probably made stereographs in Des Moines.  Burgess lists two partnerships with the Barnett name, Schreck & Barnett (1866) and Barnett & Stiffler (1871–1873).  Both were in Des Moines.  Neither of these partnership is known to have made stereographs.

 

BEATTY, WILLIAM (1844–1913)

       Beatty had a studio in Sigourney, Keokuk County, in the 1880s and 1890s.  In the Keokuk County News of April 24, 1913:  “William Beatty, Sr. Dead -Word has been received here the first of the week by the Shanagfelt Brothers living east of town, that Wm. Beatty, Sr. had died at his home in Los Angeles.  No particulars are obtainable regarding the cause of death, though he had been a sufferer of heart trouble.  The body will very likely be brought here for burial.  Mr. Beatty visited here last summer and enjoyed meeting his many friends again, who regret to hear of his death.

       From the Keokuk County News of May 8, 1913:  “William Beatty was born in Newark, Ohio, March 10th, 1844 and died in Los Angeles at the home of his daughter, Mrs. John Renfrew, April 21st, 1913 of heart failure at the age of 69 years, 1 month and 11 days.  In 1855 he with his parents moved to Wisconsin, where they lived until 1856 and then settled in Burlington, Iowa, and in 1857 changed their place of residence to Johnson County, Mo.  While living there William learned the art of photography and engaged in that occupation many years.  He came to this county in 1870 and followed his profession until a few years before he left here.  He and his wife moved to Los Angeles, California, about ten years ago.  He married Miss Katie Shanafelt in February, 1870.  They had four children, three of whom survive him, Mrs. Lottie Renfrew, of Los Angeles, William D. of Pharr, Texas, and Dr. J. David of Los Angeles.  Mrs. Beatty died in July 1910.  He was a member of the Grand Army of the Republic, the Masonic Order and IOOF.  Joined the Methodist church in Sigourney, July 1st, 1897.  William Beatty was a soldier in the war of the Rebellion and his record given below will convince all he was a gallant soldier and stuck to the service as long as the war lasted.  It will be noticed he was wounded four times and suffered in that way, all one soldier should bear.  He first enlisted in U. S. service in August 1861 near Sedalia, Mo. as a private in Independent Company of Mounted Infantry.  Was captured at Lexington, Mo. in September, then paroled on October 9, 1861.   Re-enlisted as private in Company “C” 14th Iowa Infantry at Burlington, Iowa.  Was discharged February 29, 1864 for re-enlistment at Fort Dredly and was re-enlisted or transferred to Company “M” Seventh Iowa Cavalry.  Was finally discharged at Sioux City, Iowa, June 22nd, 1866 by reason of the close of the war.  Was wounded in right foot at Lexington, Missouri again wounded between ankle and knee, again on knee cap and was injured in chest by an explosion at the siege of Lexington.  Funeral services were held in Los Angeles, April 27th.  The body was accompanied by his daughter, Mrs. Renfrew and son, W. D. of Pharr, Texas.  Funeral services were held in the M. E. Church in Sigourney May 4th conducted by Rev. Lloyd Lanning, the pastor of the church.  After which the Grand Army and IOOF, each held a short service and there the Masonic Fraternity held services at the grave.  It rained hard all day but the church was crowded full of old friends.  Deceased was shot ten times, four times in the army, five times by a robber, and once accidentally in Sigourney, which no doubt shortened his life many years.  Mr. Beatty was a splendid man and the type of citizen any town is proud to claim.  Friendly, kind, considerate.  He will be mourned by his family and sadly missed by his wide circle of friends.”

       Stereographs by this photographer have been seen by the NSA (Darrah).  He worked in Sigourney from 1870 until about 1903.  No stereographs of his work are available through the SHSI.

 

BELL

   Bell had a studio in Ottumwa, Wapello County.  The studio was at 211 East Main Street.  He produced a series entitled, 1903 Series Bell’s Stereoviews of Iowa that contained many views of Ottumwa and the surrounding area.  Some views were embossed with “Bell”.  He also made views of Colorado.

 

BELL, ISAAC A.

       Bell had a studio in Donnellson, Lee County, in the 1870s.  The NSA of a portrait of children and dolls has reported a single view.  Burgess lists him during 1891–1895 in Donnellson, but also having worked in Ft. Madison and Farmington at a later time.  While in Ft. Madison, he had a partnership called Bell & Courtright.  There are no stereographs by Bell available in the SHSI collection.

 

BELVEAL, E. S.

       Belveal had his studio in Ottumwa, Wapello County.  Later, it is believed he may have gone to Butte, Montana.  Views by this photographer have been seen by the NSA members (Darrah).  They felt he was in Ottumwa in the 1880s and 1890s.  No other biographical information exists, and no views are available at the SHSI.

 

BENTON, W. E.

       Benton had a studio in Missouri Valley, Harrison County.  The gallery was named the Excelsior Gallery.  The SHSI has two extremely interesting stereographs by an unknown photographer (but probably by Benton) -- one of the interior and one of the exterior of Benton’s gallery, plus one other view (labeled Benton) of the Loess Hills.

 

BERNARD, A. L.

       Bernard's studio was in Avoca, Pottawattamie County, in the 1870s and 1880s.  He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer.  The SHSI collection has three images by A. L Bernard.

 

BERTRAND, EDISON E.

       Bertrand had a studio in Cresco, Howard County, in the 1870s and 1880s.  There was also an E. E. Bertrand, according to Burgess, in Independence in the 1880s as part of a partnership called Barclay & Bertrand.  This was probably the same person.  The name was supplied by the NSA (Darrah) as they had seen an example of his work in Cresco.  He is also listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as being a Cresco photographer.  No examples of his work are available at the SHSI.

 

BEVERAGE, MAURICE C.

       Beverage had a studio in Marshalltown, Marshall County, in the 1870s through the 1890s.  He had a partnership as Beverage & Jessup.  A single view, probably by this partnership, has been reported by the NSA; a non-stereo view of a drawing of Iowa Soldier's Home in Marshalltown.  Burgess also lists a Morris C. in Dubuque in 1889.  Maurice C. Beverage is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as a Marshalltown photographer.

 

BILBROUGH, JOHN E. (1840–?)

       Bilbrough had a studio in Dubuque, Dubuque County, from 1864 to 1899.  Portrait and Biographical Record of Dubuque, Jones and Clayton Counties, Iowa, 1894, pp. 266–267, says this about Bilbrough:  “It is an important principle in human nature to admire the artistic and beautiful, not only as representing scenery, but also personal friends.  As an artist of high character, who has done much to improve and raise the standard of art work in photography, we mention the name of Mr. Bilbrough, whose studio is situated on the southwest corner of Main and Eighth Streets, Dubuque.  A native of England, our subject was born in Derby, Derbyshire, February 18, 1840, being the son of William and Mary (Roland) Bilbrough.  In the school of Brentwood, in Essex, he gained a good education, and completed his studies in Leeds, Yorkshire.  In his native land he learned the art of photography, but did not commence in business in England.  In 1861 he immigrated to the United States, coming via the Dominion of Canada, and spending fifteen months in Toronto.  He then crossed to Wisconsin, where he spent three years.  Later he made a short sojourn in Chicago.  The year 1864 witnessed the arrival of Mr. Bilbrough in Dubuque, where he has since devoted his entire attention to his art.  He occupies commodious rooms, which he has fitted up into a first class studio supplied with the latest appliances of photography.  In point of years of active business he is the oldest photographer in the eastern part of the state, and is both widely and favorable known.  He has an extensive trade, and is prepared to turn out a fine shape everything from a minette to a life size picture finished in pastel, crayon, or watercolors.  The marriage of Mr. Bilbrough occurred in 1874, and united him with Miss Julia A. Van Evra, an accomplished lady then living in Akron, Ohio.  Socially our subject affiliates with the Masonic Lodge No. 125, AF and AM, Dubuque Chapter, R.A.M. and Siloam Commandery No. 3, K.T. in religious belief he is a member of the Episcopal Church, to which his wife also belongs.  They have a comfortable home on Broadway, to which are welcomed their host of warm personal friends.”

       The 1873–74 Dubuque City Directory states:  “Mr. Bilbrough became a skillful artist in photographic art some ten years ago, and is now one of the best in Dubuque.  Many parlors and center tables are adorned by the photographs taken by Mr. Bilbrough, and though they cost a dollar or two, they could not now be bought for a hundred and some of them not for a thousand dollars.”  The directory also claims that Bilbrough made porcelain pictures, and that in all styles of his art, he excelled, and that no customer ever found fault with Bilbrough's work.  An ad in the 1877 Dubuque City Directory says:  “E. Bilbrough, Artistic Photographer Southwest cor. 8th and Main, Dubuque, Iowa, I possess one of the largest lenses made by Dallmeyer of London, especially adapted for life size portraits - the only one in the state.”

       A series was entitled “Views of Dubuque & Vicinity.”  The SHSI collection consists of eight stereographs by Bilbrough including three views of a four-view series on the wreaths given by groups in Dubuque to Mrs. Garfield in sympathy following the death of the president.  The other views are of scenic views around the city of Dubuque.

 

back to top

 

BINGHAM, F. V.

       Bingham had a studio in Clermont, Fayette County.  A prominent series was entitled “Beauties of Clermont.” A J. P. Calvin of Clermont, Iowa published his views.  There was a backlist of thirteen images, which begin with a 100 number.  At least two of these views were taken on the grounds of the residence of William Larrabee and are available at the SHSI.  The others are of scenes around Clermont.  Bingham probably was working in the 1880s.  It is not known if Calvin was also a photographer.

 

BITTENBENDER, LEVI C.

       Bittenbender had a studio in Knoxville, Marion County, in the 1870s and 1880s.  He was thought to have married Hannah Smith on October 15, 1879.  He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as a Knoxville photographer.  The NSA reports having seen a single view by Bittenbender, that of a home.  There are no views by this photographer in the SHSI collection.

 

BLACKHALL, JOHN

       Blackhall was a Clinton photographer beginning in the 1860s through the 1870s.  He had a studio at the corner of Fifth Avenue and Second Street.  A prominent series was entitled “Views of Clinton and Vicinity.”  It was also thought that he sold pirated views of the Chicago fire of 1871.  The SHSI has a single view in their collection, that of a rail bridge on the Mississippi River.

 

BLAIR, LYMAN G.

       Blair had a studio in Ida Grove, Ida County, in the 1870s and 1880s.  He may have also had, according to Burgess, a studio in Odebolt in 1879.  NSA members say that he made rare views of the Mississippi River, but this may have confused with the Missouri River.  He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as an Ida Grove photographer.  There are two views by Blair in the SHSI collection.  One shows a street parade and the other shows a hailstorm in Denison on June 12, 1877.  From History of Western Iowa, p. 565: “L. G. Blair, photographer, was born in Ill.; moved to Wis. when quite young, and in 1876 moved to Denison, Ia.  He came to Ida Grove in 1879, and established business.  He has a branch establishment in Odebolt; is prepared to do first class work at low prices.”

 

BLAIR, ROBERT H.

       The name of Blair as a Keokuk stereographer was supplied by members of the NSA.  They thought he worked there in the 1860s.  According to the Directory of Civil War Photographers, he was in Keokuk in 1864.  There is none of his work available through the SHSI and no biographical information.

 

BLAIR, WILLIAM E.

       Blair was believed to have had a studio in Sac City, Sac County, in the 1870s and 1880s.  Burgess also lists him in Rock Rapids in 1889–1895 and Belle Plaine 1897–1899.  His name was supplied by the NSA.  They reported a single view of an unidentified home.  It is unknown if there was a relationship between him and Lyman Blair of Ida Grove or Robert Blair of Keokuk.

 

BORLOUG, OLE E. (1856–1894)

       Borloug (Borlaug) had a studio in Decorah, Winneshiek County.  Previously a photographer in Calmar, Winneshiek County, he was said to have produced stereographs at both localities.  Though a W. A. Borlaug has also been said to have produced stereographs in Calmar and Decorah, this has not been verified and may just be confusion concerning the name of this photographer.  According to Burgess, there was also a John E. Borlaug in Decorah (1895–1897) but this relationship is unknown.  An obituary in the Decorah Republican of April 5, 1894 states:  “At his home in this city, Thursday, March 29th of consumption, O. E. Borlaug, in his 37th year.  O. E. Borlaug was born in Wisconsin, June 22, 1856.  In 1864, he came to Winneshiek County with his parents and settled near Calmar.  His home was on the farm and in Calmar until about seven years ago when he came to Decorah and purchased the photography business of A. W. Adams.  Some two years ago he became a victim of the disease which caused his death.  Before dying he arranged all his business affairs.  He leaves an invalid wife and three children, comfortably provided for.  The remains were taken to Calmar, Tuesday, for burial in the family lot.

       Also an article from the Decorah Republican of December 11, 1890, regarding a fire in Calmar on December 10, 1890, reports:  “The flames soon communicated to Borlaug's picture gallery and in spite of all that could be done, the two buildings were soon in ashes.”

       There are several examples of his work in both Decorah and Calmar in the collection at the SHSI.

 

BOURNE, A. J.

       Bourne had a studio in Cedar Rapids, Linn County, and it is thought he created mainly local views.  Two views of  residences in Cedar Rapids are in the SHSl collection.  Burgess lists an Albert Bourne in Cedar Rapids in 1880-1884 and lists this as an apprenticeship.  She also lists an A. F. Bourne in Belmond and Clarion in 1892

 

BOWEN, R. JUDSON

       Bowen had a studio in Waterloo, Black Hawk County, that was located in Miller's Block, Westside.  Was in partnership as Haddock & Bowen.  Bowen is listed in 1899 Waterloo city directory as 324 East 4th, residence 220 E. 4th.  In 1901, he is listed as 216 E. 5th, residence 904 Sycamore.  Although no examples of Haddock & Bowen stereographs exist in the SHSI, there are examples of their work at the Grout Museum in Waterloo.

 

BOYD, WILLIAM F.

       Boyd had a studio in Des Moines, Polk County.  Burgess also lists a Boyd in Winterset (1866) and a Boyd in Des Moines from 1870–1889+.  This may have been William F. or possibly Frank Boyd, who as Boyd & Barrett was in Des Moines in 1876–1877.  Burgess also lists a La Roche & Co. as having a connection.  William F. Boyd is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as a Des Moines photographer.  Examples of his work have been seen by NSA members and one example is in the SHSI collection.  There is also a CDV that might be a portrait image of his child. It is entitled, “Baby Boyd” and is taken by William Boyd’s studio.

 

BRANDT BROTHERS

       The Brandt Brothers had studios in Avoca and Walnut in Pottawatamie County.  Stereographs were probably made at both locations.  They worked during the 1880s and the 1890s.  There were three brothers who seemly worked in the studio: Fred, Henry, and William F.  This name was supplied by the NSA.  A view by Brandt Brothers was reported by Darrah.  They used the term “Art Studio” to describe their gallery.

 

BRASCH, H. K.

       Brasch had a studio in Waterloo, Black Hawk County, in the early 1900s.  He was listed in the Waterloo city directories at 100 1/2 East 4th, residence same.  This listing was from 1904 to 1912.  He made curved mount views.  There are ten views by Brasch in the SHSI collection.  All are local views of Waterloo sights.

 

BREWER, WILLIAM HENRY (1838–?)

       Brewer had a studio in Shenandoah, Page County, in the 1870s through the 1890s.  From Biographical History of Page County, Iowa, 1890, pp. 622–623:  “William Henry Brewer, an old and highly esteemed resident of Shenandoah, was born in Washington County, Indiana, January 10, 1838 and is a son of Oliver H. and Alvira (Westfall) Brewer who were married in Indiana, where their parents had settled at an early date....  William Henry remained at home with his father until he was twenty-five years old, when he married October 14, 1862, to Miss Mary Ann Procter, a native of the Hoosier State.... To Mr. and Mrs. Brewer have been born two children: George O. who is conducting a mercantile business of his own and who is a highly respected young man of twenty-five years, and Hattie, an attractive girl of sixteen years.  The parents are connected with the Congregational Church.  In politics our subject stands squarely with the Democrats, having fixed convictions on all questions of public interest.”

       There is a single example of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.  It would appear as if he mainly issued local views around Shenandoah.

 

BRIGGS, J. P.

       The name of this photographer was supplied by the NSA (Darrah), and members had seen examples of his work.  He had studio in Mitchell, Mitchell County.  The SHSI has a carte-de-visite of the exterior of his studio in Mitchell and a stereograph by an unknown photographer, possibly Briggs, of the town of Mitchell.  He probably worked in the 1870s.  No biographical information is known.

 

BROWN, HENRY R.

       Brown had a studio in Sioux City, Woodbury County, in the 1880s and 1890s.  A prominent series was “Corn Palace Views.”  He had a partnership as Brown & Wait.  There was also a Harry R. Brown in Sioux City in the early 1890s and an F. E. Brown in the city directories in 1891–92.  No known relationship exists between these men and Henry R. Brown.  Henry R. Brown is first mentioned in the city directories in 1889–90 as having a studio at 413 4th.  The 1890–91 Sioux City directory lists Brown & Wait at that same address.  The SHSI has a single view by Brown showing a bird's eye view of Sioux City.  NSA members have also seen other views of local scenes.  The partnership of Brown & Wait also produced stereographs and one is in the SHSI collection..

 

BRYAN, SYLVESTER T.

       Burgess lists a Bryan & Twiford partnership in Burlington, Des Moines County, in 1874–1875.  Studio of Bryan was at 318 1/2 Hedges Block.  The skylight of his studio may be pictured in one of his stereoviews entitled “4th Street looking South.”  He also had a partnership with Harvey as Bryan & Harvey.  Some cards say S. T. Bryan, successor to Bryan & Harvey, Photographic Artists.  He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as a Burlington photographer.  Fifteen views of Burlington by Bryan exist in the SHSI collection.

 

BUSER, HENRY R. (1840–1903)

       Buser had a studio in Cedar Rapids, Linn County, in the 1870s through the 1890s.  It was called the Star Gallery.  He also had a prominent series of views called “Scenery in Cedar Rapids.”  He was the older brother of Joseph S. Buser whose primary place of residence of work was Mt. Vernon.  Buser's studio during the 1880s was located at 53 South 1st Street.  In 1878, he was known to be in partnership as Buser & Rifenburg.  From the History of Linn County, Iowa, 1911, vol. 2, pp. 28–29:  “In the thirty-five years of his residence in Cedar Rapids, Henry R. Buser so lived as to command the unqualified regard and esteem of his fellowmen.  He was, during that period, engaged much of the time in the conduct of a photographic studio and the excellence of his work won him liberal public support.  It was his sterling traits of character, aside from his business connection, however, that gained him the firmest hold on the affections of his friends.  He was a man who stood foursquare to every wind that blows.  There were never any equivocal phases in his life but rather an open record which all might read.  Born on a farm near Williamsport, Pennsylvania, on the 3rd of April 1840 he there remained until 1858 when the family decided to seek a location in the west, and with two brothers he made the journey across Ohio and Indiana by wagon.  They first took up their abode upon a farm near Warren, Illinois, where Henry R. Buser made his home until after the outbreak of the Civil War.  He was twenty-two years of age, when in response to the country's call for troops, he offered his services to the government and joined the boys in blue of Company K, Ninety-sixth Illinois Infantry.  With that command he took part in the battles of Chickamauga, Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge, the siege of Atlanta, and other important engagements which led up to the final victories that crowned the Union armies.  His was a most creditable military record, characterized by loyalty and by bravery upon every battle field.... Just before coming to Cedar Rapids, Mr. Buser was married on the 6th of February 1868 to Miss Mary Elizabeth Gann and unto them were born two sons, who are yet living; Edward, now connected with the shoe trade of the city, and Frank, a real-estate dealer....  Two other children died in infancy.  The death of the husband and father occurred April 12, 1903, after a residence of more that a third of a century in Cedar Rapids....  His home life was largely ideal and his best traits of character were ever reserved for his own fireside.  His family found him a devoted husband and father who did everything in his power to promote the welfare and happiness of his wife and children.  In fact, he possessed many traits of character which made him a valued member of the community and enshrined his memory in the hearts of those who knew him.”

       Buser used some of the following words on his mounts: “Photographed by ‘The Star Gallery’,”  “Photographs of every description,” and “Scenery in Cedar Rapids.”  Buser is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as a Cedar Rapids photographer.  The SHSI has thirteen stereographs by Henry Buser, all local views.

 

BUSER, JOSEPH S. (1845–?)

       Joseph S. Buser had a studio in Waterloo, Black Hawk County, at E. 4th and Water from 1873–74 and in Cedar Rapids, Linn County, in the 1880s, located at 49 South First Street.  Was also in Lansing, Allamakee County (1860s); Mt. Vernon, Linn County (1880s and 1890s); Mechanicsville, Cedar County, and Lisbon, Linn County (1880s).  There are also Henry R. in Cedar Rapids (1870s–1890s), the brother of J. S. Buser, and Edward J. in Cedar Rapids (90s) whose relationship to the two brothers is unknown.  The History of Black Hawk County, Iowa, 1878, p. 464, states:  “Mr. Buser was born in Lycomining County, Pennsylvania, in 1845 and emigrated to Grant Co., Wisconsin, in 1858 where he resided until going to Warren, Illinois, engaging in business with his brother.  After one year, he went to Fulton, Illinois, and to Cedar Rapids, Iowa, and Monroe, Wisconsin, where he bought a gallery and from which place he came to this country in 1873 where he has been engaged in business.

       From the Biographical Record of Linn County, Iowa, 1901, pp. 869–870:  “J. S. Buser, the well-known and popular photographer of Mt. Vernon, was born in Pennsylvania, of which state his parents, Hacob and Nancy (Rothrauff) Buser, were also natives.  The family came west in 1859 and settled near Warren, Illinois, though just across the line in Wisconsin.  The father, who was a farmer by occupation, died there in 1881, when about seventy-three years of age.  The mother survived him several years, dying May 13, 1900, when past the age of ninety-three.  In their family were eleven children, namely: John married Sarah DeHasse, and both died in Williamsport, Pennsylvania; Mary is the widow of John Dershane and resides in Bird City, Kansas; Samuel is also married and makes his home in Warren, Illinois; Levi married Jane Maheny, who is deceased, and he is again married and lives in Warren, Illinois; Lydia is the wife of Erastus Mellinger and resides in Pine Island, Minnesota; Henry R. married Elizabeth Gann and makes his home in Cedar Rapids, Iowa; Ellis married a Miss Thornton and lives in Dawson, Nebraska; J. S., our subject, is the next of the family; and Emma died at the age of eighteen years.  Mr. Buser, of this review, began his education in the district schools, his father having donated part of the old homestead farm on which to erect a school house....  He attends the Methodist Church, and is a supporter of the Republican Party.  On the 2nd of May, 1893, Mr. Buser was married at Cedar Rapids to Mrs. Mary A. Bruch, a daughter of John and Mary M. (Metzgar) Mingle, both natives of Pennsylvania....”

       The first auto in Mount Vernon was bought by J. S. Buser in 1906.  There is a photo of Mr. and Mrs. Buser in this car in A Centennial History of Mount Vernon, Iowa, 1847–1947, pp. 96–97.

       J. S. Buser made stereographs in several Iowa cities.  The SHSI collection contains twenty four images of his time in Waterloo, two images of his work in Cedar Rapids, and one image made while he was in Lansing.  He probably made views while in Mount Vernon but none are available in the SHSI.  Prominent series while he was in Waterloo were entitled “Iowa Scenery” and “Home Scenery - Iowa Series.”

 

BYERLY, ORISON (1836–?)

       Byerly had a studio in Parkersburg, Butler County, in the 1880s and 1890s.  Burgess also lists Byerly as having lived in Dubuque, Farley, and Jesup.  In 1880 census he was listed as living in Jesup, Buchanan County.  At that time he was 45 years old and his place of birth was Ohio.  His wife was Hattie, aged 35, and he had a son Frederick, aged 9, who was born in Iowa.

       From the History of Butler and Bremer Counties, Iowa, 1883, p. 440:  “His wife is a native of Vermont.  Mr. and Mrs. Byerly have two children - Lilly and Frederick.  They lost their oldest daughter at Farley, Iowa.” Byerly worked in the 1870s and 1880s.  An ad for his work appears in the March 13, 1884, Parkersburg Eclipse.

       There are several examples of Byerly's work in the SHSI.

 

back to top

 

C

 

CAMMACK, WALTER R.

       Cammack had a studio in Marshalltown, Marshall County, in the 1880s.  His partnership was listed as Stubbs & Cammack.  He is also listed, by Burgess, as being in Storm Lake in 1881 and in Oskaloosa in 1890.

       The name of this photographer was supplied by the NSA.  They thought he worked in the 1870s and 1880s.  Stereographs were probably made by the partnership.

 

CARD, B. F.

       Card had a studio in Leon, Decatur County, in the 1870s.  A single existing view has been reported by NSA (Darrah).  Burgess does not list this photographer.

 

CARPENTER, LUCELIA (1854–1921)

       Carpenter's studio was in Parkersburg, Butler County, in the 1880s.  The address was West Side Main Street (over C. C. Buren's).  She was born in 1854 and died in 1921.  The SHSI has a cabinet photo of her given by her great niece, Aletha Frericks.  Frericks said that she remembered using the glass negatives as windows in the chicken house during the 1930s when building materials were at a premium.  Most of these panes were stereo plates.  One plate was said to be of Lucelia herself.  It is thought that she later homesteaded in Wright County, Iowa.  At one time she married a man named Durke.  She is buried in the New Albion Cemetery in Jefferson Township, Butler County.  The SHSI does not have any stereographs by Carpenter but they have been seen by collectors.  Lucelia Carpenter was one of the few women stereographers in Iowa.

 

CARTER

       Carter's studio was in Hampton, Franklin County.  Burgess lists a L. H. Carter in Hampton in 1890s and a partnership as Bates & Carter.  No other information exists on this photographer, but one image, a river scene, exists in the SHSI collection.

 

CHAPMAN, A.

       The studio of Chapman was located in Adel, Dallas County.  He worked during the decade of the 1870s and 1880s.

       This photographer's name was supplied by the NSA (Darrah) as members have seen images by him.

 

CHASE, C. B.

       Chase had a studio in Davenport, Scott County, in the 1870s.  He worked in partnership as Chase & Egbert and views reported probably had this partnership as the maker.  A single view has been reported by the NSA (Darrah).

 

CHATFIELD

       Little is known about this photographer.  He had a studio in Keokuk, Lee County.  He was in partnership as Chatfield and Allen and stereographs were probably in this name.  Burgess does not list this name.  The name was supplied by the NSA, and they thought he worked in the 1870s.

 

CHATTERTON, H. D.

       Chatterton had a studio in Villisca, Montgomery County, and in Centerville, Appanoose County, in the 1880s.  He made stereographs in both of these locations.  He may have also been, according to Burgess, in Marcus 1889–1891.  At one time there was a partnership known as Chatterton & Son in Centerville.

       The name of this photographer was supplied by the NSA.  They thought he worked in the 1870s and 1880s.  Views by Chatterton in Villisca are rare, two reported of unidentified city streets.

 

CHAVILLER, MAME

 

       Ms. Chaviller was located in Shenandoah, Page County.  Her name is hand written on a stereograph by I. B. Hamilton as being the “operator”.  She may have taken over the studio from him and simply added her name to the existing card stock.

 

CHILD, ARTHUR LEON (?–1938?)

       Child's studio was in Grinnell, Poweshiek County, in the 1880s and 1890s.  He may have died January 12, 1938 at age 83.  Prominent series was “Views of Cyclone Ruins” at Grinnell, Iowa.  These may have been the only series he made, none other reported by the NSA.

       There are two examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.  They have a backlist which shows eleven views of the tornado.

 

CLARK, LYMAN

       Clark had a studio in Webster City, Hamilton County, in the 1880s and 1890s.  Burgess also believes he was in Albion in the 1860s.  NSA reports that he made rare views of local scenery.

 

CLAUSEN, AXEL J. (1864?–?)

       A. J. Clausen had a studio in St. Ansgar, Mitchell County, in the 1880s.  His father was also a photographer, Christian M.

       The 1885 state census lists Alfred C. Clausen as being 21, a farm laborer who was born in Denmark.  He was one of nine children to Christian and Elna (Ella?)

       There are three examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.  They show local scenes.

 

CLAUSEN, CHRISTIAN M. (1833–1923?)

       Had studio in St. Ansgar, Mitchell County.  Clausen may have died in 1923.  His son was another St. Ansgar photographer, Axel J. Clausen.

       In 1880 federal census,  Clausen is listed as painter, age 47, married to Ellen E.  He was born in Denmark, she in Sweden.  Had eight children.  Address in 1885 state census was 1st and Washington.  The 1885 census states their child who was 14 was born in Denmark but their child who was 11 was born in Iowa.  The 1910 federal census declared him to be age 77 and a widower, having immigrated to the U.S. in 1871 and working as a house painter.

       There is an example of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.  He worked in the 1870s and 1880s.  His views are often on cabinet mounts.

 

CLEMENT, EBEN

       Clement had a studio in Marshalltown, Marshall County, in the 1870s and 1880s.  The gallery was called Clement's Art Palace and was located on the corner of Main and Centre Streets.  A cabinet photo in Journal of the West (January 1989, p. 47) shows a female retoucher from the Clement studio at Main and Center Streets in Marshalltown at work on her retouching job.  He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer.

       There are two examples of this work of this photographer in the SHSI collection.

 

CLIFFORD, CHARLES, and CLIFFORD, FREDERICK

       Clifford had a studio in Newton, Jasper County, in the 1880s and 1890s.  One series was “Views of Colfax.”  There was a partnership as Clifford & Son.  Some stereographs were produced as “Clifford's” and some as “Clifford & Son,” referring to his son, Frederick, who is listed in Newton in 1887–1899.  The 1916 city directory of Newton includes a picture of the old Clifford Studio (site occupied in 1916 by Vern Roberts' Grocery).

       From the Newton Journal, May 2, 1883:  “Stereoscope - Formerly the Journal was indebted to Mr. C. Clifford for photographic views of notable happenings in Newton, and we have quite a collection of them.  On Friday, we rec'd a couple of excellent stereoscopic views of the ruins of the recent fire, marked; “With the compliments of Fred Clifford.”  This is the only son of Mr. C. Clifford, a lad of about 14 who has purchased a camera, and intends devoting his time during the present summer in taking outside views.  The specimens furnished us give promises that he will rival his father as an artist.  It is hardly necessary to add that we highly appreciate these tokens of remembrance on the part of Mr. Clifford, or that we will carefully preserve them for future reference, among the many other mementoes of the same kind.”

       There are two examples of the work of this photographer in SHSI collection.  One is by the partnership and one simply says, Clifford's.  The NSA also mentions an L. Clifford in Newton in the 1870s.  A view by him was reported by Darrah.  Frederick Clifford was also reported to be in Newton from 1870 to 1891, then later in Muscatine.

 

back to top

 

CLOUGH, J. F.

       Clough had a studio, according to the NSA, in Audubon, Audubon County, in the 1880s.  View recorded by Darrah.  Burgess does not list this photographer.  The NSA (Darrah) also lists a Cloughly in Audubon in the 1870s and 1880s.  He is not listed by Burgess.  May be the same person.

 

CLUTTER, D.

       Clutter had a studio in Newton, Jasper County, in the 1870s.  Was in a partnership called Clutter & Daft.  A single view by this partnership has been reported by the NSA.  Clutter is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer.  This name may have been mispelled as Clutterd on some mounts.

 

COLLINS, CEPHAS H.

       Collins had a studio in Wyoming, Jones County, in the 1870s.  A view was reported by the NSA (Darrah).  Burgess lists him as being in Wyoming in 1880–1882.  He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer.

 

COMAN, GERRET S. (1849–1913?)

       Coman's given name may also have been Gerrit.  He had a studio in Storm Lake, Buena Vista County, in the 1870s through the 1890s.  He was also known to have made stereos of the 1890 Corn Palace in Sioux City.  He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer.

       There are three examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection including one of the 1890 Corn Palace.

 

CONNERS, W. J.

       Connors had a studio in Clarinda, Page County, in the 1860s and 1870s.  A single view was recorded by the NSA (Darrah).  Burgess has him recorded as Conner.

 

COOK

       Had a studio in West Union, Fayette County.  Reported by the NSA but no other information.  Stereos may have been made in a partnership of Cornell & Cook.  He probably worked in the 1870s.

 

COOK, ISAAC N.

       Cook had a studio in Davenport, Scott County, in the 1860s and 1870s (at least some examples predate 1868).  He possibly worked from 1862 to 1875.  A series of views was entitled “Views on the Mississippi” and “Views in Davenport.”  He was in at least three different locations in Davenport:  2nd between Brady and Main, 82 Brady, and 324 Brady.  The History of Scott County, Iowa, 1882, p. 411, states that an Isaac Cook was an unsuccessful Whig candidate for the position of Secretary of State.  The 1870 federal census lists an Isaac “W.” Cook as aged 43, residing at 4 West Davenport, occupation photographer.  He was born in Ohio.  His wife's name was Elizabeth and a son Clarence, 18, who was born in Illinois and also lists occupation as photographer.

       There are three examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.

 

COOK, JOHN C.

       Cook had a studio in Webster City, Hamilton County, in the 1880s.  He was later in Rochester, Minnesota.  Views by him are rare, but collectors have seen one local view of a bridge on the Boone River.

 

COOK, JOSEPH

       Cook had a studio in Waterloo, Black Hawk County, at Bridge Street (W. 4th) in 1886.  He was also in Waterloo in the 1870s, according to the NSA.  He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer.

       An example of this photographer's work was seen at the Grout Museum in Waterloo.

 

COOK, NEWTON GASTON

       May have had a studio in Ames, Story County (1880–1888) and in Onawa, Monona County (1892–1897).  No views seen with the Onawa mark but label on a cabinet view offers, “Ferrotypes, photographs of all descriptions, and views for the parlor stereoscope.”  Views have been seen by NSA (Darrah) of his work in Ames.

 

COON, SAMUEL H. (1844–?)

       Coon had a studio in Malcom, Poweshiek County, in the 1880s and 1890s.  He also had a studio in Victor during this same time.  From The History of Iowa County, Iowa, 1881, pp. 572–573:  “Coon, S. H.; Photographer, Victor.  Was born in Mercer County, Ohio, on the 29th day of September, 1844, where he resided until he was about nineteen years of age.  Was brought up on a farm and educated in the common schools of that state....  He was married on the 8th of March, 1871, to Miss Martha E. Sanford, of Mason City, Cerro Gordo County, and as a result of this union they have four children; Cassius B, Edith P., Lulu L., and Samuel H.”

       There is an example of the work of this photographer with the Malcom address in the SHSI collection.

 

COPE BROS. (THOMAS AND JOSEPH A.)

       They had a studio in Lyons, Clinton County, in the 1870s.  A single view was reported by the NSA, of a baby sitting in carriage.  Burgess lists them as being in Clinton in the 1890s.  (Lyons is now a part of the town of Clinton.)

 

CORNELL

       Cornell had studio in West Union, Fayette County, in the 1870s.  He was in partnership as Cornell & Cook and views possibly bear this name.  They were reported to have made stereographs but this has not been totally confirmed.

 

CORNING, NATHAN A.

       Corning had a studio in Osage, Mitchell County, in the 1880s.

       The name of this photographer was supplied by the NSA (Darrah).  He probably worked in the 1870s to the 1890s. He had a partnership with Samson and produced views as Samson & Corning.  There is one such view in the collection of SHSI.  It may show their studio.

 

COTTRELL

       Cottrell had a studio in Dunlap, Harrison County.  Little is known about this photographer.

       The name of this photographer was supplied by the NSA (Darrah).  They thought he worked in the 1870s.

 

COUVENS, J. W.

       Couvens had a studio in Waverly, Bremer County, in the 1870s and 1880s.  Views by him are rare; five have been seen.  Views have been seen from a photocopy with hand-scripted name on back; spelling may vary.

 

COYLE, FRANK A.

       Coyle had a studio in Monticello, Jones County, in the 1870s through the 1890s.  He was also in Cedar Rapids in the 1890s.  He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as a Monticello photographer and views bear this address.

       There are three examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.  One of these is a exterior stereograph of Mr. Coyle's studio.

 

CRARY, MISS EVA E.

      Crary may have had a studio in Sanborn, O’Brien County in the 1870s.  There is a backmark on a stereograph that bears her name and address.  The actual picture on the card, however, was done by the Spencer photographer, W. I. Rood.  He has written his name over hers.

 

CROSS, DANIEL H. (1836–?)

       Cross was in Indianola, Warren County, 1879–1880, and later had a studio in Des Moines, Polk County.  He had prominent series on the “Grinnell Tornado Views.” He is also listed as having been a photographer in Bennington, Vermont.  From the Portrait and Biographical Album of Polk County, Iowa, 1890, pp. 762-763:  “Daniel H. Cross, one of the pioneer photographers of Iowa, and the proprietor of one of the most popular art studios of the Capital City, is a native of the Green Mountain State.  He was born in Shaftesbury, Vermont, on February 2, 1836 and is the grandson of Major Elihu Cross.  On the old homestead in Vermont, Daniel Cross was reared to manhood.  He received excellent educational advantages, considering the opportunities afforded in those days, his early school training being supplemented by several terms attendance at an academy.  He started out in life for himself at the age of seventeen years, and whatever success he has met with and whatever prosperity has crowned his efforts is due to himself alone.  On New Year's Day of 1866, in Brattleboro, Vermont, Mr. Cross was united in marriage with Miss Lizzie A. Newman, a native of Newfane Township, Windham County, Vermont.

       “In 1871, Mr. Cross became a resident of Chicago, where he followed his profession for seven years.  In 1879, he located in Indianola, Iowa, and in connection with the management of a gallery he engaged in the manufacture of dry gelatine plates until January, 1880, when he removed to Des Moines, and carried on both lines of business until 1886, since which time he has devoted himself, exclusively to the latter branch.  For thirty-five years he has been connected with photography and it is needless to say has met with success.  Politically, Mr. Cross is a Republican, and is a member of the Society known as the Des Moines Secular Union, of which he had the honor of being the first president.  To Mr. and Mrs. Cross were born four children but only two are now living - Arthur, the eldest died in childhood; George S. is associated with his father in business; Clarence M. was killed in a railroad accident when six years of age; and Brainard C. completes the family.”

       Also reported to have worked in Chicago by the NSA.  There are thirty-one examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.  All are from the Grinnell Tornado series, with 60 being the highest number.

 

CUTLER, SCHUYLER

       Cutler may have had a studio in Mount Pleasant, Henry County, at some point.  They thought him to be in Mt. Pleasant in the 1890s.  Burgess lists as being in Mt. Pleasant (1882-1897) and Winfield (1899).

 

CUTTER, EPHRAIM (1823–1886)

       Cutter had a studio in Dubuque, Dubuque County, in the 1860s through the 1880s.  According to research by Scott J. Reis, Loras College student:  Mr. Cutter had his business started and located on the corner of Main and Fourth Street here in Dubuque.  He was a native of Tompkins County, New York, and was born May 18, 1823.  He came to Iowa in 1851 and started his business in 1854.  He was formerly a cabinet maker and furniture dealer.  He afterwards worked for Corey and Pickerill, photographers, from whom he learned the art of photography.  He was in partnership with Samuel Root in 1868–69 and moved twice in his business before his death.  In 1863, he married Miss Mary C. Lewis, sister of Alasco Lewis, of this city, who died in 1868, leaving one daughter, Annie Louise, who lived with her aunt, Mrs. L. Chamberlain, at Englewook, Illinois.  He was found dead by Mr. Ed. Mobley, and Mr. Peter Kiene, Jr. both from Dubuque.  Mr. Cutter boarded with Mr. Mobley over a John Mehlhop, Son & Co.  What was interesting about Cutter's death was that they called Mr. J. W. H. Morhiser to investigate Cutter's place of business.  According to Morhiser, Cutter's place of business was in such shape as to make it very injurious to his health.  This was caused by the materials which Cutter used in producing pictures; the developing room was very closed and had no ventilation.  Within the past five years, it had been known to the photographers of the city that several sudden deaths had occurred to the old men using the process in photography like Cutter's and death was attributed to the occupation of some of these sudden deaths.  However, Dr. Waples was summoned and examined the body of Mr. Cutter and ruled the death one of natural causes.”

       Had studio at southeast corner of Main and 5th and residence at 440 Locust at one time.  E. Cutler listed at 4th & Main in Dubuque in 1863–65 according to the Directory of Civil War Photographers (note spelling of name).  Also listed in the 1881 Gazetteer.

       The name of this photographer was supplied by the NSA and was thought to have made stereographs with his own name rather than partnership.

 

back to top

 

D

 

DABB, R. I.

       Dabb had a studio in LeMars, Plymouth County, in the 1880s through the turn of the century.  Burgess also lists a James V. in LeMars in 1884 (relationship unknown).

       There are two examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.  One stereograph shows his son.

 

DAFT, CHARLES E.

       Had studio in Newton, Jasper County, in the 1870s.  Burgess lists a partnership of Clutter & Daft.  This partnership possibly made the stereographs.

 

DAMMAND, ROBERT PETERSON (1855–?)

       Dammand had a studio in Des Moines, Polk County in the 1880s.  He worked in partnership as Daugherty & Dammand.  A prominent series was “Views of Des Moines & Vicinity.”  He was also in Harlan in 1885–1895 and is listed by Burgess in Oskaloosa in 1899.  From Biographical History of Shelby and Audubon Counties, Iowa, 1889, p. 331:  “Robert Peterson Dammand, photographer, Harlan, is a native of Denmark, born in Horsens, September 6, 1855.  He is a son of P. R. and Elizabeth (Anderson) Dammand, natives of Denmark.  When he was thirteen years old his father died.  He was reared on a farm, and received his education in the common schools of his country, which he attended until he was fourteen years old.  After leaving school he went on the farm, and remained a year and a half; then he went to the city of Horsens, where he engaged in various occupations until he came to America in 1873.  He landed at Portland, Maine, and went from there to Montreal, Canada, he then went to Racine, Wisconsin, where he engaged in a wagon factory.  He worked at this for some time, and then went on a farm, where he stayed for a year and a half and then returned to his native country.  There he worked at the carpenter's trade for three years, and afterward attended school for awhile.  At the age of twenty-two he entered the army, according to the requirements of the Danish government and served for fifteen months.  After leaving the army he began the study of the photographer's art, and served an apprenticeship of eight months, when his employer died, and he again returned to his former trade of carpentering.  He worked at that until 1880, when he, accompanied by his mother and sisters came to America and settled in Story City, Iowa.  Here Mr. Dammand remained four months when he went to Des Moines and engaged in photography.  Here he remained three years, and then went to Houghton, Michigan, where he resided one year.  January 10, 1885, he came to Harlan and purchased the gallery of F. Reynolds and has since been doing a profitable and satisfactory business.  Mr. Dammand was united in marriage August 11, 1887 to Mrs. Lettie Potter, who was a native of Whiteside County, Illinois and a daughter of Frederick Hille.  Mr. and Mrs. Dammand are the parents of one child, Vera Lenore.  Mrs. Dammand is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church and Mr. Dammand is a member of the Danish Lutheran Church.  Politically he is independent.”

       There are two examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.  They are by the partnership of Daughtery & Dammand in Des Moines.  He was also said to have produced Harlan stereographs.

 

DATESMAN, PETER

       Had studio in Eldora, Hardin County, in the 1870s and 1880s.  Single view reported by the NSA (Darrah).  Burgess also lists him in Marshalltown and a partnership of Datesman & Baum in MarshalItown. He is also known to have had a partnership with Hunt in Datesman and Hunt.  There is one example of their work in the SHSI collection. He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as being in Marshalltown. 

 

DAUGHERTY, C. J.

       He had a studio in Des Moines, Polk County, in the 1880s.  He was in partnership with Dammond as Daugherty & Dammand also had partnership as Baldwin & Daugherty.  Prominent series was “Views of Des Moines & Vicinity.”

       A photo of his traveling photo studio appears in Bennett's An Iowa Album.

       There are seven examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.  Six are by the partnership of Baldwin & Daugherty; one by Daugherty & Dammond.  Two of the Baldwin & Daugherty are  exterior views of the state capitol.

 

DAY, E. A.

       Day published stereographs under the name of E. A. Day & Co. All seen have been pirated views.  He may have been a publisher rather than a photographer.  His offices were in Davenport, Scott County.  There is one example, a pirated view from outside of Iowa, in the SHSl collection.

 

DE LONG, W. W. (1858–?)

       De Long had a studio in Sioux City, Woodbury County.  Prominent series was “Views of Sioux City and Northwest.”  Publisher of his views was J. W. Pinckney & Co.  He also had a studio in Yankton, South Dakota.  The 1880 federal census lists W. W. DeLong as being 22 years of age and being born in Massachusetts.  He worked in the 1870s and 1880s.  He was brother of C. A. Delong, also a photographer.

       There are five examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.  Among these are Sioux City street scenes and one shows a graduation ceremony.

 

DEMPSIE, GEORGE M.

       Dempsie had a studio in Elkader, Clayton County, in the 1870s and 1880s.  He also worked in Clayton 1880 and produced stereographs there and Strawberry Point in 1899 but unsure if stereographs were produced here.  He also made views in Garnavillo but not sure if he had a studio there.  He had several prominent series:  Views of Elkader and Vicinity, Beauties of Clayton County, and Views of Devil's Hollow.  While in Strawberry Point had partnership as Dempsie & Niles in 1899.

       There are twenty-three examples of this photographer in the SHSI collection.  One stereograph has a backlist that describes the town of Elkader and also lists twenty-four local sights.  There are nine stereographs in the SHSI collection from Clayton and two show Garnavillo scenes.

 

DENNIS, E. G.

       Little is known of this photographer.  He was from Waverly, Bremer County.  He probably worked in the early 1880s.

       There are examples of this photographer’s work in the SHSI collection.

 

DITTS

       Ditts had a studio in Eagle Grove, Wright County, in the 1880s.  “Photo Artist” was listed on his cards.  A single view seen of house with group on lawn.  Burgess does not list him.

 

DOLEN, JOHN O.

       Dolen had a studio in Lake Mills, Winnebago County, in the 1880s.  A single view reported by the NSA, a studio portrait of a woman.  Burgess lists him in Lake Mills in 1895 and in Buffalo Center in 1897–1899.

 

DOOLITTLE, ALONZO P.

       Doolittle had a studio in Columbus Junction, Louisa County, in the 1880s.  He is also listed in Lanark, Illinois, in 1886.  Burgess also lists a Nancy Doolittle in Columbus Junction in 1880.  He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as being in Columbus Junction.

       The name of this photographer was supplied by the NSA.  They thought he worked in the 1870s and 1880s.

 

DOUGHERTY, H.

       Dougherty had a studio in Waterloo, Black Hawk County, in the 1870s.  His name was supplied by NSA (Darrah).

 

DOUGLASS

       Douglass had a studio in Waverly, Bremer County.  Partnership was known as Hickox & Douglass.  This partnership may also have produced cards in Waterloo and Vinton.  Burgess lists a Levi Douglass but gives Coggon, Manchester, and Sutherland (1889).  Examples of the work of Hickox & Douglass do exist and many are in the SHSI collection, but it is unknown if Waverly was the town of issue.

 

DUNLAP, THOMAS A.

       Had studio in Bloomfield, Davis County, in the 1870s through the 1890s.  Though not sure if he was a photographer of stereographs, but he did advertise “Stereoscope views of Bloomfield” for sale.  The studio was located at the northwest corner of the square.  He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as being in Bloomfield.

 

back to top

 

E

 

EBERHART, H. C.

       Little in known of this photographer.  He is said to have been in Springville, Linn County.  There is also a Harry C. in Tama (which could be our subject) in 1884 and Shell Rock in 1889–91 and an H. C. in Reinbeck.

       The name of this photographer was supplied by the NSA.  They thought he worked in the 1880s and 1890s.  According to the NSA he called himself a “Traveling Photo Artist.”  His home location was said to be in Iowa but not verified.  There are also rare views of Colorado scenery by this photographer.

 

EBERHART, MANOAH H.

       Eberhart had a studio in Mount Vernon, Linn County, in the 1870s and 1880s.  He was also initially in Cedar Rapids in 1865, and later in Preston (1889), and in Wyoming by 1891.

          From History of Cass County, Iowa, 1884, p. 874:  “J. A. Hayden, one of the business men of Atlantic, is a photographer, and has his studio on the southwest corner of Chestnut and Fourth Streets.  The subject of this sketch was born in Ohio, but when a child, removed with his parents to Mt. Vernon, Iowa.  He began learning his business in the fall of 1874 in the photographic art rooms of M. H. Eberhart, at Mt. Vernon, and was subsequently employed in Des Moines and elsewhere.”

       According to the Directory of Civil War Photographers, M. H. Eberhart was in Mt. Vernon in 1865.  He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as a Mt. Vernon photographer.

       There are four examples of the work of this photographer in the SHSI collection.  They are of local views.

 

EGBERT, WILLIAM P. (1831–1904)

       William P. Egbert had a studio in Atlantic, Cass County.  Mr. Egbert was born in Holidaysburg, Pennsylvania, on August 14, 1831, and came to Davenport, Iowa, about 1850.  In 1852, he opened a photograph gallery which he operated until 1876 when a fire destroyed the property.  He then went to Atlantic, Cass County, and began a photo business there in 1877.  He continued working until his death on January 19, 1904.  He had nine children, five of which survived him.  The Atlantic Messenger, January 20, 1904,  said:  W. P. Egbert, the senior member of the Egbert photographic firm, died at his home in this city at ten minutes after eight o'clock last evening, Tuesday, Jan. 19.  Funeral services will be held at the Methodist church at two-thirty o'clock Friday afternoon, January 22, and the remains will be buried in the Atlantic cemetery.  Mr. Egbert was born in Holidaysburg, Pennsylvania, on August 14, 1831.  He came from that state to Davenport, Iowa, about 1850 and in 1852 opened a photograph gallery in that city where he flourished until 1876 when his entire property was consumed by fire.  He determined not to reestablish his enterprise in Davenport, but came to Atlantic and in 1877 began his career as a business man here, a career which continued honorable and successsful up to the moment of his death.  Mr. Egbert's first wife died soon after the war of the rebellion, and he was married to the present Mrs. Egbert in 1872.  Five children are living and four are dead.  Those living are Misses Lillie, Carrie, Mrs. Lon Highley, Hal Egbert, and Miss Mazie.  Mr. Egbert was a member of the Methodist Church, and a charter member of the Knights of Pythias lodge of this city and of the original Uniform Rank of this place.  Besides his immediate family he leaves one sister whose home is in Washington.  Mr. Egbert was a man of high honor, his friends continued his always.  He led a life which honored his Maker and the memory of which will be a gracious heritage to his children.”

       This photographer's name was supplied by the NSA (Darrah).  They thought he worked in both Atlantic and Davenport and made stereographs at both locations.  In Davenport, 1864–65, according to the Directory of Civil War Photographers.  Partnership as Chase & Egbert and also Bridge & Egbert during part of his time in Davenport.  The Putnam Museum has examples of Egbert's work in Davenport.  His address was listed as No. 312 Brady Street.  Other addresses according to city directories include, NE Cor Sec. & Brady, 45 Brady, 56 Brady, and 312 Brady.

 

EGNES, JOHN

       Egnes had a studio in Story City, Story County, in the 1870s.  A single view reported by NSA is of a store front.

 

ELDER, GEORGE W.

       Elder had a studio in Forest City, Winnebago County, from the 1870s through the 1890s.  An article in the Forest City Summit of January 16, 1877, announces that G. W. Elder is to start photo gallery.  A description of his gallery in the September 28, 1881, issue of the same newspaper.

       There are three examples of the work of this photographer in the SHSI collection.

 

ELITE STUDIO

       This studio, located in Morning Sun, Louisa County, produced stereographs in the early 1900s.  The photographer's name is not known at present.  The name of the studio is embossed on the cards.  There were also Elite Studios in Waverly and Iowa City but unknown if there was any relationship.

       There are four examples of the work of this studio in the SHSI collection, all of a January 1911 ice storm.

 

ELLIOTT, HERBERT I.

       Elliott had a studio in Davenport, Scott County, in 1871–1875.  Partnership was called Jones & Elliott.  Stereographs were produced were by this partnership and one is in the SHSI collection.  Burgess also lists the same partnership in Marion in 1875–1878 with Elliott still listed in Marion in 1892.

 

ELLIOTT, WILLIAM H.

       William H. Elliott had a studio in Marshalltown, Marshall County, in the 1870s.  A prominent series was “Stereo Views of Marshalltown and Vicinity.”  This may have featured views along the “Central Rail Road of Iowa.”  There was also a William H. Elliott in Clarinda in 1884, according to Burgess.

       There is a single example of the work of this photographer in the SHSI collection.  It shows the hotel on the island in Clear Lake, along the “Central Railroad of Iowa.”

 

ELLIS, AZRO D.

       Ellis had a studio in Waterloo, Black Hawk County, in the 1880s.  He is not listed in city directories but an example of his work is at the Grout Museum in Waterloo.  There is also one example in the SHSI collection.  On this view, he uses a mount that had been made for Hickox & Douglass.  Perhaps he had purchased some of their stock after they had moved on to another location. 

 

ELVING, LARS ERICK (1862–1918)

       Elving's studio was located in Albert City, Buena Vista County.  He moved to Albert City in 1901 from Gowrie, Webster County, to establish the first photo studio.  Elving was a later stereographer, working with a curved mount format and producing stereographs during the first decade of the twentieth century.  Some said that his studio had a roof that opened to let in sunlight.  He embossed his cards with his name, which was unusual.  He made local views, some with an artistic flair.

   According to an interview with an Albert City resident, Mr. Elving’s studio was a frame building on the main street of town where (in 1990) the Brown Body shop stands.  Elving married and had three step-children.  There is a photo of his studio at the Albert City Historical Society.

       There are twenty-six examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.  All are of Albert City or surrounding towns.

 

EMERSON, JAMES H.

       Emerson had a studio in Keokuk, Lee County, in the 1870s.  A single view has been reported by NSA of an unidentified subject.  Burgess lists him advertising his “Photographic Palace” with dates from 1854 to 1882.

 

EMERY, J. F.

       Emery had a studio in Northwood, Worth County, in 1872–1880.  Eleven views by this photographer are in the SHSI collection including a series of the early building in the town.   He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as being in Northwood.

 

ENSMINGER, JEFFERSON C. (1845–?)

       The Ensminger Brothers had their studio in Independence, Buchanan County, in the 1860s through the 1890s.  The studio was in Ungerer's Block, No. 3 Main Street.  Jefferson worked with his brother, Madison, as the Ensminger Brothers.  They were the sons of E. M. Ensminger, an eastern photographer.  A cabinet photo of Jefferson C. Ensminger, taken by “Mad” (Madison) exists.  In 1870 census, Jefferson was 27 and had been born in Ohio.  In 1880 census, he is listed as 38 with wife, Amanda L. who was 31.  Two children, Fred P., aged 3, and Mary B., aged 1, both born in Iowa.

       The History of Buchanan County, Iowa, 1881, pp. 271–272, provides the following information:  Ensminger Brothers, established about 1870 give special attention to copying and enlarging; three persons constantly employed.  The firm consists of J. E. Ensminger and J. M. Ensminger and are located in Ungerer's block upstairs.  This enterprising firm engaged in photography in the city of Independence, consisting of J. C. and J. M. Ensminger, was organized in the year 1870.  The senior partner, Mr. J. C. Ensminger, was born in Stark County, Ohio, in 1843.  His father being a photographer, he commenced when only a boy, to make himself well acquainted with the business.  When he became a man his design to become proficient as an artist led him to Cleveland, Newark, and Columbus, Ohio.  Also to New York City and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where he was connected with some of the finest galleries in the country.  Sparing neither time nor money to make himself master of the photographers are, in all its branches.  In the year 1868, he came to Independence where he has since been engaged in the business.  Mr. J. C. Ensminger was married in Waterford, Vermont, in 1872, to Miss Amanda Brown.  They have a family of two children, Freddie and Mary, aged three and five respectively.  Mr. J. M. Ensminger was born in Stark County, Ohio, in 1845.  He associated himself with his father in the photograph business in Ashland, Ohio, principally prior to coming to Independence, which was in the year 1870 at which time he and his brother engaged as partners.  Mr. J. M. Ensminger was married in this county, in 1877, to Miss Alice Anderson, a resident of this county.”  Both brothers are listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as being in Independence.

       There are nineteen examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.  NSA reports they used the term “Photographers & Publishers of Stereoviews” and issued local scenery to #61; things such as ice storm scenes, fire of Nov. 1873, numbers 20 before and after, of Ft. Meyers, Florida in the late 1880s, of Jacksonville, 1901.  They moved to Florida from Iowa in 1885.  Sanford, Florida, in 1886 is listed and Park Ave., Sanford, Florida, in 1900.

 

ENSMINGER, J. MADISON

       Shared studio in Independence, Buchanan County, in the 1860s–1880s with his brother, Jefferson, as the Ensminger Brothers.  They were the sons of E. M. Ensminger, an eastern photographer.  For more information, see above (Jefferson C. Ensminger).

 

ESMAY, JOHN (1834–1911?)

       Esmay had a studio in Sabula, Jackson County, in the 1860s and the 1870s.  According to the Directory of Civil War Photographers, John Esmay was in Sabula as early as 1862–64.  He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as a Sabula photographer.

       There is an example of this photographer's work in the Clinton County Historical Building and five examples at the SHSI.

 

EVANS, JAMES G.

       Evans had a studio in Muscatine, Muscatine County, in the 1860s and 1870s.  Prominent series include “Evans' Western Views,” “Panoramic Views - Complete in Six,” “Panoramic View of The City of Muscatine, Iowa - Complete in Five Scenes,” and “Western Scenery.”  There was also a J. G. in Iowa City 1864–65.

       From A. T. Andreas Illustrated Historical Atlas of the State of Iowa, 1875, p. 529:  Evans, J. G. - born in Putnam County, Indiana, came to state in 1846.

       Muscatine Weekly Journal of Friday, Feb. 4, 1881 page three, col 2:  Ross Wheeler has ad for cheap photos at Evans' old stand.

       According to the Directory of Civil War Photographers, J. G. Evans was in Muscatine in 1862–65.  According to the NSA, Evans traveled extensively, issued Western Stereoscopic Views Arkansas Valley A Series, Illinois, Iowa scenery.  Also seen has been a backlist of 49 images of Wichita, Kansas City area scenery.

       There are more than fifty-three examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.  There is also one view from his work in Kansas

 

EVANS, T. E.

       Evans had a studio in Muscatine, Muscatine County.  Five examples of his work are in the SHSI.  Burgess does not list him.  His relationship with J. G. Evans is unknown.

 

EVERETT, E. G.

       Everett had a studio in Des Moines, Polk County.  His prominent series was “Views of Des Moines.”  Also a James E. Everett in Des Moines Indianola, but uncertain of relationship.

       There are seven examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.

 

EVERETT, JAMES E. (JAS.) (1834–?)

       Everett had a studio in Indianola, Warren County, and also in Des Moines during the 1880s called Everett & Co.  Made many stereographs including prominent series on the Grinnell Tornado and the Chicago Fire.  In the 1880 federal census he is listed as being 46 years old and born in Canada and living at 1423 N. 11th Street.  His wife Ellen was 42, also a native of Canada.  Had children, Florence (17), Charles (11), Ellenor (9) and Arthur (6).  The census noted they were recent immigrants, living ten years in Iowa.

       An article by Richard Paxson in the Des Moines Register, November 6, 1983, referenced a notice from the Iowa State Register of July 29, 1871:  “Mr. James Everett, photographer of lndianola has shown us some very fine stereoscopic views of a few of the residences and business blocks of the city.  Among them are views of the iron bridge, post office, courthouse...and the homes of Judge Cole, Hon. B. F. Allen, Wesley Redhead and a beautiful view of a group playing croquet, these views are all got up in the most attracative manner and are as fine specimens of photography as we would wish to see.”  Everett called his studio the California Studio and he seems to disappear from Des Moines around 1885.

       According to the NSA, his series were “Council Bluffs Views,” “Des Moines & Environs” (30 views), ten of the Grinnell tornado, Chicago fire (unclear whether original or pirated) few nice genre such as croquet, picnic,  or a baseball team in uniform.

       There are forty-two examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection as James Everett.  There are an additional seventy-three as Everett & Co. which is also probably James Everett.

 

back to top

 

F

 

FAIRBANKS, JAMES A. (1849–1910)

       Fairbank's studio was in Center Point, Linn County, in the 1880s and 1890s.  One son Mark, was a photographer in Independence and Clinton, Iowa, but died in 1903.  There is a photo of his studio at the Center Point Historical Society.  He also had a studio in nearby Walker, Linn County.

From his obituary in the Center Point Journal, September 29, 1910:  “James A. Fairbanks was born on February 14, 1849 in Apalachia County, New York, and died at his home in this city Wednesday, September 21, 1910 aged 61 years, 7 months and 7 days.  He came to Iowa with his parents in 1864 and was united in marriage to Miss Sarah Williams September 22, 1867.  To this union were born five children, two of whom survive him.  He leaves a wife, two daughters, Mrs. Sheffield, of Wenatepee, Wash., and Mrs. Hassell, of Pocahontas, Iowa, six grandchildren, four sisters and one brother and a host of friends to mourn his departure.  Mr. Fairbanks had the distinction of having the best cameras in his photographic studio that there were in the state and he was an artist of exceptional ability in his line.  His studio will be continued by Mrs. Fairbanks and his grandson, Fred Sheffield.  Mr. Fairbanks had many admirable qualtities.  He was a man of integrity, a good business man and loyal neighbor.  He was satisfied to be just himself without any sham or cloaking of faults.  His impress is left on the community and his memory will live in hundreds of homes in the photos he made when this generation shall have passed away.  The funeral was held at the home Saturday afternoon, Elder E. J. Sarchett, assisted by Rev. W. N. Chaffee, conducted the funeral services and the body was laid to rest in the city cemetery.”

       There is an example of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection. He issued local views.

 

FARR, H. R.

       Farr had studios in Minneapolis, Minnesota; Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin; and Dubuque, Iowa.  He was in partnership with Goodman in Prairie du Chien in 1870s.  He had several back lists indicating he created views of local scenery including the Mississippi River, bridge, ships, schools, artesian well, launching of McManus, crowd and a body hanging.  He was succeeded by L. T. Butterfield in Prairie du Chien. Farr is listed in Minneapolis 1875–1890.  Imprint also seen as “Farr and Son.” There is a view of McGregor in the SHSI collection that was made when he was producing stereographs in Prairie du Chien.

       This name came from the NSA.

 

FARRINGTON, THEODORE (1844–?)

       Farrington had a studio in McGregor, Clayton County, from the 1860s through the 1890s.  Prominent series was “Views of McGregor and Vicinity.”  In the 1870 federal census, Farrington was 25 years old and had been born in Maine.  His wife, Elizabeth was 22 and born in Massachusetts.  In 1880 federal census revealed that Farrington was living on Main Street with son Ray, 8, and another child, L. C., both born in Iowa. The 1870 census also listed another family in the Farrington household, a Louis Peavy, also listed as a photographer and his wife, Lynn and their 5 year old male child.  This was possibly Mrs. Farrington's brother.

       From History of Clayton County, Iowa, 1882, p. 979:  “Theodore Farrington was born in West Hampton, Maine, August 16, 1844, and when a mere boy his parents emigrated to Beaver Dame, Dodge County, Wisconsin, where he remained on a farm until he was twenty one years of age. He then embarked in the photography business and in 1868 he came to McGregor where he has since successfully prosecuted his business.  In July 1869, he married Elizabeth Peavy, a daughter of Franklin Peavy.  She was born in Massachusetts in 1847.  Two children bless this union - Ray and Lester.  Mr. and Mrs. Farrington are members of the Baptist Church.  He is an artist of no ordinary talent and ranks with the representative businessmen of McGregor.”

       There are fourteen examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.

 

FAVORITE

       Favorite had a studio in What Cheer, Keokuk County.

       The name of this photographer was supplied by NSA.  They thought he worked in the 1870s and 1880s.  A single view reported by NSA (Darrah).  Burgess does not list this photographer.

 

FELLOWS, ELIHA G.

       Fellow's studio was in Vinton, Benton County, from the 1870s through the 1890s.  The 1880 federal census lists him at age 34 and born in New York.  His wife, Lottie A., was also 34 and also born in New York. They had a son Ernest, aged 6, a daughter Bessie, aged 4, and a son Jessie, aged 1.  All three children are listed as being born in Iowa.  He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as a Vinton photographer.

       There are ten examples of this photographer’s work in the SHSI collection.

 

FIELDS, MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM B. (MARGARET J.)

       This couple had a studio in Lyons, Clinton County, in the 1870s and 1880s.  Views are rare, only two reported of local scenery. SHSI also has a possible larger print of the side of their gallery. Later a Fields & Son (Alva) in the 1890s were in (Lyons and Clinton).  William is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as a Lyons photographer.  Lyons and Clinton are now the same city. Possibly made views while in Lyons and also while in Burlington.

       Fields had a studio and was listed as a daguerrotypist in Burlington, Des Moines County, in the 1850s.  Also was known to have been in Morris (1858–1868) and Fulton City (1858–1859), Illinois.  He was also possibly in partnership with Lighter in Chicago in the 1870s.  Burgess lists him in Burlington in 1853.

 

FISHER

    Fisher was in partnership and produced views by Hastings, White & Fisher in Davenport, Scott County.  They possibly worked in the late 1870s and 1880s.  There is one such view in the SHSI collection.

 

FISHER, GEORGE C. (1823–?)

       Fisher had a studio in Clarksville, Butler County, in the 1870s and 1880s.  One prominent series was “Views of Clear Lake.”  The History of Butler County and Bremer Counties, Iowa, 1883, p. 532, reports:  “George Fisher is a native of Nova Scotia, born on the 12th day of August, 1823.  His father, John P. Fisher, was also a native of the Province, but his mother, Agnes (Connelly) Fisher was born in the state of Pennsylvania.  He learned the carpenters trade and followed the same near the place of his nativity until 1847 when he came to the United States and for eleven years was engaged in repairing the machinery of cotton mills in the states of Massachusetts and Rhode Island....  In 1862 Mr. Fisher enlisted in Company G of the Seventh Rhode Island Volunteers and was wounded at the battle of Fredricksburg, Virginia, December 13, 1862, and was therefore on the 27th day of March 1863 honorably discharged. He then emigrated to Minnesota, and for two years resumed work at his trade....  Mr Fisher has been thrice married.  In 1844 to Miss Mary A. Jenkins.  She died in 1858 leaving four children - Robert, Isabelle, Agnes, and Jessie.  In 1859 he married Mrs. Mary Percival nee Falls.  She died January 2, 1865, and in June 1871, he married Mrs. Harriet M. Marsh nee Cox, and by this union one daughter - Lillian.” Fisher is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer.

       There are nine examples of this photographer's work while he was in Clarksville in the SHSI collection.  Some are numbered so may be part of a series.  Most are taken in Clear Lake.  NSA reports a view from Vinton also.

 

FLANDERS, CHARLES M.

       Flanders had a studio in Glenwood, Mills County, in the 1890s.  NSA reports a single view seen of a group of women posed by piano in studio.  Burgess lists Humeston (1887–1892), Corydon (1889–1892), and Glenwood (1895–1897).

 

FORD, E. A.

   Ford had a studio in Grundy Center, Grundy County, in the 1880s.  He may have died in 1911. There is one view showing the newly completed First National Bank building in 1885 that is in the SHSI collection.

 

FOSNOT, LEWIS C. (1847–1930)

       Fosnot had a studio in Keosauqua, Van Buren County, in the 1870s to the 1890s.  Formed a partnership as Fosnot & Hunter and views came from this partnership.  A sketch from the Portrait and Biographical Album of Jefferson and Van Buren Counties, Iowa, 1890, p, 315, states:  “Lewis C. Fosnot ranks among the leading and successful business men of Keosauqua, his business being that of photography.  This gentleman who is so widely known throughout Van Buren County, claims the honor of which few of his years can boast, that of being a native of the city where he still makes his home.  His parents, Samuel and Catherine Fasnacht, whose sketch appears elsewhere in this work, are numbered among the early settlers of the community. They have retained the old country orthography but their son has adopted the English mode of spelling the name.  In the common schools of his native town, Lewis Fosnot acquired a liberal English education and was fitted for his life work. Looking about him for some trade or profession which would prove a pleasant as well as a profitable business, he chose that of photography and having become familiar with the art in all its details he embarked in business for himself in 1872, continuing in the same line for eighteen consecutive years.  As in his lessons in the school room, he makes a thorough study of his business, familiarizing himself with the latest methods and improvements and his work will compare favorable with that of many an artist in the larger cities.  His studio is a popular one and the liberal patronage which he receives indicates that he has found favor with the public.  In 1870, Mr. Fosnot, in Keosauqua, led to the marriage altar Miss Elizabeth Hunter, daughter of Robert Hunter.  The lady was born in West Virginia, in 1848, and in the community where she now makes her home is held in high esteem by a large circle of friends and acquaintances. The union of Mr. and Mrs. Fosnot has been blessed with a family of five children, one son and four daughters, namely, Carrie, Minnie, Katie, Samuel, and Mary.  Having passed his entire life in Keosauqua, Mr. Fosnot has been a witness of the many great changes which have taken place in Van Buren County during the past forty years.  His memory goes back to the days when not a railroad crossed its borders, when much of the land was still in its primitive condition, and when the little log school house and primitive cabin marked the site of many a good institution of learning or palatial home of today.  He has seen towns and villages spring up, has witnessed the introduction of the telegraph and telephone, together with the establishing of many industries and enterprises and feels a just pride in Van Buren County, his only home.”

       There is a view from the partnership of Fosnot and Hunter in the SHSI collection.  It would appear as if they worked in the 1870s.  NSA says “Keosauqua & Vicinity” backlists (20+) included views of buildings, trains, ships, schools, churches, soldiers monument, Hangman's Hollow, among others.

 

FOX, GEORGE W.

       Fox had a studio in Osage, Mitchell County in the 1880s.  Partnership as Fox & Wiltse.  Burgess lists a Fox and Wiltsie in Mitchell in 1884 and in Mason City in 1880.

       There is an example of this photographer's work (as Fox & Wiltse) in the SHSI collection.

 

FRANKLIN, E. S.

       Franklin was in Montour, Tama County, in the 1870s. He had the Star Gallery.

       There is an example of the work of this photographer in the SHSI collection.  It is of a large downtown building.

 

FREEBORN, LEE H.

       Freeborn had a studio in Des Moines, Polk County, during the 1860s through the 1890s.  A.T. Andreas Illustrated  Historical Atlas of the State of  Iowa, 1875, p. 539, lists L. Freeborn as a Des Moines photographer who came to the state in 1868 and his nativity being Kentucky.  He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as a Des Moines photographer.

       The name of this photographer was supplied by the NSA. They thought he worked in the 1870s with a single view of rural scenery reported.

 

FRITZ, JOHN S. (1821?–1891?)

       Fritz had a studio in Waverly, Bremer County, in the early 1880s.  May have died on March 16, 1891 of Bright's Disease (when 70 years old).  Was also in Guttenberg, Iowa.  He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as a Waverly photographer.

       The name of this photographer was supplied by the NSA. They thought he worked in the 1880s.  NSA says he listed as a “Traveling Photographer,” and a single local farm scene known.

 

FRY, WILLIAM D.

       Fry had a studio in Villisca, Montgomery County, in the 1880s.  Burgess also lists him as having been in Hopkinton in 1880–82 and Clarinda in 1887–89.

       There are two examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.

 

back to top

 

G

 

GAMBLE

       Gamble had a studio in Whittier, Linn County. Partnership of Hampton & Gamble and views came from this partnership.  He made curved mount views in the early part of 1900s.

       There are four examples of this partnership in the SHSI collection.

 

GARDNER, RICHARD G. (1837–?)

       Gardner had a studio in Maquoketa, Jackson County, in the 1860s through the 1880s. According to the 1870 federal census, he was 33 years old and born in New York.  His wife Prusella was age 22 and they had one son, Richard, aged two, who was born in Iowa.  His prominent series, which was sold in Philadelphia by Brady and Company, was “Iowa State Scenery.”  Another prominent series was “View of Burt's Cave.”  Gardner used poetry by William Cundill (another prominent Maquoketa, Iowa, photographer) on the back of his stereographs.  According to the Directory of Civil War Photographers, Gardner & Wiley were in Maquoketa in 1865.

       There are twenty examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.

 

GARRISON BROS.

       The Garrison Brothers had their studio in Fort Dodge, Webster County, in the 1870s through the 1890s.  There were three brothers:  Charles F., Frederick A. and C. C.  In addition, Charles F. also practiced in Ruthven (1892), Rolfe (1892), Marathon (1892), and Laurens (1895).

       From Illustrated Fort Dodge - Leading Features of the City, 1896, pp. 143–145:  “Mr. F. A. Garrison came with his brother, C. F. from Michigan in December 1884 and took charge of the studio and business so long owned and operated by Mr. J. B. Leisenring, and has thus put in twelve years of uninterrupted business life in Fort Dodge.  During that time he has built up a business in the line of photography which is one of the finest to be found in the state.  Mr. Garrison is most thoroughly progressive and has always been the first to give to the public the benefit of the latest and best productions of the art.  On the morning of January 17, 1892, the building in which Mr. Garrison's studio was located was totally destroyed by fire, and with it everything which the studio contained, including a stock of ten thousand negatives.  This was a most serious loss, but within twenty four hours there was tacked upon the icy ruins this sign: Too frigid for comfort, but still in business two blocks east.  Here Mr. Garrison went into temporary quarters until the following June, when the present spacious gallery was ready for occupancy.  This studio was, only last year, enlarged, and now consists of two spacious front parlors with office, with an operating room 22 by 30, which is fully equipped with up to date apparatus, which enable him to produce pictures which are works of art, which means the expression of a thought rather than a mere chemical production.  Mr. Garrison has ever aimed to give his patrons the best that experience, study, and observation could produce.  Still to the rear of the operating room are found the finishing room and the workshop, arranged to manufacture picture frames, also the printing and wash rooms.  Mr. Garrison now employs three assistants.  His main helper, Mr. H. O. Baldwin, began as an apprentice when sixteen years of age, nearly twelve years ago, and with the exception of five years among others photographers, has been continually in Mr. Garrison's employ, which is conclusive evidence of his ability and trustworthiness.  Mr. Garrison has been among the first in the west, if not the first, to make practical use of electricity in the production of photographic negatives, having worked out and perfected a system of diffusing and reflecting screens, which with an ordinary arc lamp, produce a negative of a softness and brillancy which rivals the light of Old Sol himself.  Mr. Garrison finds that his patrons are not limited to Webster County, nor to Iowa, but the names of people from not a few of our leading cities are found upon his books, attesting the fact that his work is equal to the best.”

       The names of these photographers were supplied by the NSA.

 

GAY, W. D.

       Gay had a photo studio in Essex, Page County.  His prominent series was “Views of Essex, Iowa, and Vicinity.”

       There is one example of his work in the SHSI collection.

 

GILBERT

       Gilbert had a studio in Nashua, Chickasaw County, called the Star Gallery.  He was in partnership of Gilbert & Wilkin.  Burgess lists this partnership as Gilbert & Wilkins.

       There are four examples of the work of this photographer in the SHSI collection.  Both are by the partnership.

 

GILBERT, CALVIN HUBERT

       Gilbert had a studio in Independence, Buchanan County.  There is a view by him in the SHSI collection.  Burgess lists date as 1898.  Relationship with the Gilbert in Nashua is unknown.  There may be one view by this photographer in the SHSI collection. The name Gilbert appears but no town is listed.

 

GILCHREST, GEO. K.

       (May also be spelled Gilchrist) He had his studio in Cedar Falls, Black Hawk County, located on Main Street opposite the Davis Hotel. One advertisement says he is the successor to H. A. Jordan. He worked in the 1880s.  Was also in Fairfield in the 1880s.

       The name of this photographer was supplied by the NSA.  They thought he worked in both Cedar Falls (1860s to 1880s) and also in Fairfield.  NSA reports single view seen as a Cedar Falls photographer.

 

GOLDSBERRY, BENJAMIN E.

       Goldsberry's studio was in Bedford, Taylor County.  He also may have had studios in Red Oak and Ottumwa at one time.  Appears to have worked during the 1870s and 1880s.  There is also an Anna E. listed in Chariton (around the turn of the century) by Burgess. He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as a Bedford photographer.

       The name of this photographer was supplied by the NSA (Darrah).

 

GOSTING, G. G.

 

       There is one stereograph by Gosting in the SHSI collection.  His studio was in LeMars in Plymouth County.  He may have worked in the 1880s.

 

GOULD

       Gould had a studio in Clear Lake, Cerro Gordo County.  He was in partnership as Townsend and Gould.  There is an example the partnership’s work in the SHSI collection. There are also eight examples by Gould alone. There was also a partnership with T. W. Townsend of Iowa City in the Iowa View Company in Clear Lake.  Stereographs also come from this partnership.

 

GRAACK, NICHOLAS P.

       Graack had a studio in Davenport, Scott County, in the 1870s and 1880s (possibly from 1874 to 1884). Studios at southeast corner of Second & Main, and 125 Main.  He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as a Davenport photographer.

       The name of this photographer was supplied by the NSA.  A single view reported of an unidentified city building.

 

GREEN, BENJAMIN F.

       Green had a studio in Ottumwa, Wapello County, in the 1870s.  He was in partnership as Green and Smith and stereographs probably bear this name. Also a partnership as Green and Post in Ottumwa.  He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as an Ottumwa photographer.

       The name of this photographer was supplied by the NSA. They thought he worked in the 1870s and issued local stereographs.

 

GREENLEE, WILLIAM F.

       Greenlee worked in Belle Plaine, Benton County, during the 1880s.  He had a partnership with Joseph A. Miles (Miles & Greenlee) and views came from this partnership.  They made many views of “Jumbo” artesian well.

       There are four examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection. They are by the partnership and are of “Jumbo.”

 

GREENWOOD, WILLIAM H. (1838–?)

       Greenwood's studio was in Manchester, Delaware County, in the 1860s and 1870s.  There was also, according to Burgess, a Greenwood in Waterloo.  From History of Delaware County, Iowa, 1878, p. 577:  “Greenwood, William H.; Photographer and ornamental painter, Tama Street, was born in Wilmington, Delaware, February 11, 1838; married Caroline M. Collyer July 3, 1859, who was born in Tully Valley, Onondaga County, New York, July 9, 1840.  They were married at Clinton Junction, Rock County, Wisconsin, where they had moved; they moved to Delaware County, Iowa, June 8, 1866.  Commenced his present business when fifteen years old.”  Also a W. H. Greenwood listed in Beloit, Kansas, in the 1870s.

       His name was supplied by the NSA.

 

GRONEMAN, FRED C.

       Gronemam had a studio in Fort Dodge, Webster County, in the 1870s and 1880s,  It was located at the corner of Market Street and the Public Square.  The Biographical Record and Portrait Album of Webster and Hamilton County, Iowa, 1888, pg. 409, states: 

“C. GRONEMAN, photographer, Fort Dodge, is the proprietor of the oldest studio in the city.  It was established in 1873 by James B. Leisenring, who sold out in 1880 to Dr. A. B. Vansickle, and he, in 1883, to Mr. Groneman.  Our subject is a native of Dansville, Livingston County, New York, born in 1862, a son of F. A. Groneman.  His father moved to Iowa in 1865, and settled in Dubuque, where he lived until 1872, when he came to Fort Dodge, and is now a member of the firm of Patterson & Groneman, furniture dealers.  Then but twelve years of age, in 1874, F. C. Groneman began to learn the art of photography of Mr. Leisenring, remaining with him seven years and a half. He then went to Brainard, Minnesota, and thence to Clinton, Iowa, becoming more skilled in his art the longer he followed it.  Returning to Fort Dodge in 1883 he located in his present quarters, where he has increased from time to time what was already a good business. He is devoted to his art and is always among the first to adopt the improvements that are constantly being made.  He is a young man of genial and cordial manners, which, added to his well-known skill, makes him popular in his line of business.

       There is an example of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.


 

GROSVENOR

       He had a studio in Dubuque, Dubuque County. Little is known about this photographer.  He is not listed in the Dubuque city directories.  He had partnership as Grosvenor & Harger.

       There are six examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.  There are backlists on the cards, numbering to 33 and all are of Dubuque views.

 

GROSZHEIM BROTHERS

     The brothers had a studio in Muscatine, Muscatine County.  They probably worked in the 1880s and 1890s.  There are two examples of their work in the SHSI collection.  Their studio was at 117 and 119 East Second Street in Muscatine.  They produced local views.

 

GURNSEY, B. H. (1842–?)

       Gurnsey's studio was in Sioux City, Woodbury County, in 1871–72 according to the city directory.  Prominent series was “Glimpses of the Great Northwest.” Studio was on Pearl between 4th and 5th.  The 1870 federal census for Sioux City says that he was 28 and was born in England.  His wife was Lizzie who was 25 at that time and born in New York. They had three children, all born in Minnesota.  The eldest was named William and was six, the younger two, unnamed, were 5 and 4.  He is also listed in the St. Paul city directory for 1870.  Had a partnership called Gurnsey & Illingsworth.  According to the Directory of Civil War Photographers, there was a B. W. Gurnsey in Sioux City in 1865.  NSA reports that he was also in Pueblo and Colorado Springs, Colorado and Santa Fe, New Mexico.  He became a noted western photographer.  Some views have autograph signature.

       There is an example of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.

 

back to top

 

H

 

HADDOCK

       Haddock had a studio in Waterloo, Black Hawk County, that was located in Miller's Block, “Westside.”  He was in partnership as Haddock & Bowen and stereographs probably come from this partnership.  He is not listed in city directories as a photographer.  An example of this photographer's work is at the Grout Museum in Waterloo.

 

HALE, DE WITT C. (1857–1934)

       De Witt Clinton Hale had a studio in Elkader, Clayton County, in the 1870s, 1880s, and later.  An article on his life and work by Bill Witt in The Iowan, March 1978, pp. 36–43, states:  “Although his stock in trade was portrait photography, he found time to take his camera out of doors and, for more than 50 years beginning in about 1875, photographed a wide variety of scenes in Elkader and the surrounding area.  When nine-year-old DeWitt Hale and his widowed mother arrived in Elkader in 1866, it was already a prospering town.  Hale grew up on the nearby farm of his maternal grandparents and in 1875 graduated in the first senior class of the local high school.  While still in school, he began working for a Dubuque photographer named Nichols.  A few years after graduation he became the manager of his employer's Elkader studio.  The evidence suggests that Hale had at least a two fold purpose in photographing Elkader.  For one, he hoped to sell stereopticon views of local sights and landmarks to the townspeople.  Unfortunately for him, the venture never took hold - he once remarked to his daughter that his total earnings from his finely detailed stereo and 6 by 8 inch prints probably amounted to less than one hundred dollars.  A second motivation was the desire to compile a photographic record of the community.  Despite the lack of success with the stereo slides, he continued his documentation, apparently convinced that his out of studio camera work, for whatever it lacked in immediate appeal, possessed a potential historical significance.  As if anticipation some future interest, Hale signed and dated many of his negatives, here and there attaching notes to them as well.”

       There are two unmarked views by this photographer in the SHSI collection.  They have been identified as Hale views by the negatives in the SHSI.  SHSI has several glass plate negatives of Hale’s stereographs.

 

HALL, JOHN R.

       Hall had a studio in Monroe, Jasper County, in 1878–1897+.  There are five examples of his work in the SHSI collection.  Four are possibly of the Grinnell Tornado of 1882.  Hall is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as a Monroe photographer.

 

HALL, WILLIAM W.

       Hall's studio was in Northwood, Worth County. From 1879 to 1883 he was in both Mitchell and Northwood also had partnership as Elliott & Hall.

       An example of this photographer's work was seen by collectors.  It was by Hall, not the partnership.

 

HALVORSEN, JOHN R.

       Halvorsen had a studio in St. Ansgar, Mitchell County, from 1878 to 1884. From St. Ansgar Enterprise, April 25, 1883 - J. R. Halvorsen has been absent for a couple of weeks visiting relatives in Forest City and Albert Lea.  August 15- J. R. Halvorsen was at Albert Lea the first of the week looking up a suitable place to open a photogrpahic gallery.  He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as a St. Ansgar photographer.

       There are six examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.  One shows the photographer's wife.

 

HAMILTON, ISAAC B.

       Hamilton had a studio in Shenandoah, Page County.  His studio was located in Bender's New Brick.  Lists Mrs. Mame Chaniller, Operator.  Called “Art Studio.” Dates were, according to Burgess, 1884–1899+.  There is an example of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.

 

HAMILTON, JAMES H.

       Hamilton had a studio in Sioux City, Woodbury County, in the 1870s through the 1890s.  Was in partnerships as Hamilton & Hoyt, Hamilton & Kodylek, and Hamilton & Co. There was also, according to Burgess, a James H. Hamilton in Spirit Lake in 1880.  He had prominent series with Native Americans, “Corn Palace Views” (1888, 1889, 1890), “Views of the Northwest,” and “Stereoscopic Views of the Northwest.”  Census figures of 1870 indicate he was 31, born in Wayne County, Kentucky, and unable to write.  The 1880 census, however, says he is 46 at that time and lives on 4th Street.  His wife, who is 40, is named Emilia, and was born in Pennsylvania, and his family consists of Charles C. (19) born in Missouri, James (15) born in Nebraska, Carlson (11) born in Iowa, and Harry (5) born in Iowa.  He probably arrived in Iowa in 1868.  He is mentioned in A. T. Andreas Illustrated Historical Atlas of the State of Iowa, 1875, p. 551.  Hamilton & Hoyt studio listed in city directory of 1875–76 as being at 71 Fourth Street.  In 1876–77 Hamilton alone listed at 4th opp. P.O., in 1880 –81 listed as being on 4th between Douglas and Pearl.  In 1883 being at 407 4th.  This location continues through 1889–90.  According to the Directory of Civil War Photographers, there was a C. S. Hamilton in Sioux City in 1864.  NSA also lists him in Wakefield, Nebraska.  Series included “Stereoscopic Views of the Northwest” and “Stereoviews of Clear Lake.”  Back lists of this series to #17  Also views of town streets and city overviews, gypsum quarry (source of Cardiff Giant), river steamers, parade, church interior, cemetery monuments and groups, Black Hills scenery, Indian baby.  Twenty views annually of exterior and interior of Corn Palace 1888–1890.  Listed in Sioux City from 1876 to 1890.  Imprint also seen as “& Co.”  He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as a Sioux City photographer.

       There are forty-five examples of the work of this photographer in the SHSI collection as Hamilton and eight as Hamilton & Hoyt.

 

HAMPTON

       Hampton had a studio in Whittier, Linn County. Partnership of Hampton & Gamble and this partnership made the views. They made curved mount views in 1890s and early part of 1900s.

       There are four examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.

 

HARGER

       Harger had a studio in Dubuque, Dubuque County. Little is known about him.  He is not listed in the Dubuque city directories.  He was in partnership as Grosvenor & Harger, and the partnership made the stereographs.

       There are six examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection. There are backlists on the cards that number  to 33.

 

HARPER, OTIS L.

       Harper had a studio in Bancroft, Kossuth County, in the 1890s.  A single view reported by the NSA, that of the Methodist Church in Armstrong.  He was also in Audubon (1897).

 

HARPER, CHRISTOPHER C. (1848–1928)

       Harper had his studio in Audubon, Audubon County, in the 1880s and 1890s.

       This name was supplied by the NSA. They thought he issued local views.

 

HARVEY, MRS. H. P.

       Mrs. Harvey had a studio in Maquoketa, Jackson County, in the 1870s.  A single view reported by the NSA of local scenery.  She was active in 1875.  Burgess lists her as working through 1891.  She is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as a Maquoketa photographer.

 

HARWOOD, BURRITT (1855–?)

       Harwood had a studio in Charles City, Floyd County, in the 1880s.  A partnership with Mooney was known as Harwood & Mooney, and the views came from this partnership.  “Camp Wildwood” was a prominent series and also “Views on and About the East and West Okoboji and Spirit Lakes.”  According to the History of Floyd County, Iowa, 1882, p. 750:  “The senior member of the firm, Burritt Harwood, is a native of Charles City and was born November 26, 1855.  He received his early education here, attending the Charles City High School, and afterward the Academy of Design, Chicago.”  NSA reports also a “Dickinson City” with views of city streets, school buildings, church with group, historical houses, most on cabinet mounts.

       There are twenty examples of the work of Harwood & Mooney in the SHSI collection.  There are also two different backlists for each of their prominent series, the Camp Wildwood series has 25 views and the Okoboji and Spirit Lake series had 35 views.

 

HASSEL, N.

       Hassel had a studio in Decorah, Winneshiek County.

       The name of this photographer was supplied by the NSA. They thought he worked in the 1870s and issued rare views of local scenery.

 

HASTINGS

     Hastings was in partnership and produced views by Hastings, White & Fisher in Davenport, Scott County.  They possibly worked in the late 1870s and 1880s. There is one example of their work in the SHSI collection.

 

back to top

 

HAWKES, E. M.

       Hawkes' studio was in West Union, Fayette County in the 1880s and 1890s.  His name may also be E. H. Hawkes.  Burgess lists a Mark E. H. in West Union in 1880–1895+.  Hawkes is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as a West Union photographer.

       The name of this photographer was supplied by the NSA (Darrah).

 

HENRY, L.

    It has been reported that Henry made stereographs in Bonaparte, Van Buren County.  One view has been seen that was on a large yellow mount titled, Front Street, from Christy Corner west.  He may have worked in the 1880s.

  

 

HICKOX, R. A.

       Hickox had a studio in Waterloo, Black Hawk County.  It is unclear where he made his views.  He does not seem to list an address on his cards.  It was called Hickox and Co.  He may also have been in Vinton, Benton County.  A Hickox & Douglass were also in Waverly.  He was also said, by the NSA, to have been in St. Paul, Minnesota, in the 1870s and 1880s.

       There are eight examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.  Four others are Hickox & Douglas, and these may be  Waverly cards. The others are probably made in Waterloo.

 

HILDRETH

       Hildreth was in partnership in Clinton, Clinton County.  It was called Hildreth, Young & Co. and views probably came from this partnership.

       The name of this photographer was supplied by the NSA (Darrah).  They felt the partnership was in Clinton in the 1870s and 1880s.

 

HILL, GEORGE (1840–?)

       Hill worked in Burlington, Des Moines County, in the 1870s through the 1890s.  He was in two partnerships, Monfort & Hill and Schoonmaker and Hill (in New York?).  The History of Des Moines County, Iowa, 1879, p. 641, states:  “Hill, George was born in England, Dec 2, 1840, came to Genesee Co., New York, where he lived three years.  In September 1862, he enlisted in the 1st Missouri Eng. Reg. and served until the close of the rebellion.  Came to Burlington in 1865 in present business ever since.”  Ad in Burlington Hawkeye of June 30, 1876, states: “Monfort & Hill are the reliable photographers of Burlington.  Mr. Henry Carey, whose portraits have been so universally admired, is still with us.  These pictures must be seen to be appreciated.  The public are cordially invited to call at 207 1/2 Third Street.”  He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as a Burlington photographer.  There are four examples of the work of Monfort & Hill in the SHSI collection.

 

HOLBROOK, M. N.

       Little is known of this photographer.  Have also seen name listed as N. M. Burgess lists it as Nelson Holbrook in 1880.  He also worked with Slocum in Nora Springs as Holbrook & Slocum in the 1870s.  He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as a Charles City photographer.

       An example of this photographer's work as Holbrook has been seen by collectors.  There are also five views by Holbrook & Slocum in the SHSI collection.

 

HOLDEN, HERMAN T.

       Holden had a studio in Keota, Keokuk County, in the 1880s.  He used a Keota imprint with his name and probably produced local views.  The views in the Wilson Memorial Library in Keota, however, show scenes in Geneva, Ohio.  This may be a city he lived in before coming to Keota. One view also shows the eclipse of the sun on July 24th, 1878.  He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as a Keota photographer.

       There are examples of his work (non-Iowa views) in the Wilson Memorial Library in Keota.

 

HOLMES, BENJAMIN A.

       Holmes may have been a photographer or may have been optometrist who sold local views.  From History of Franklin County, Iowa, 1914, vol. 2, pp. 256–257:  “For many years Benjamin A. Holmes was engaged as a contractor in Hampton, Iowa, but of late has turned his attention to the optical -business.  He was born in DeKalb County, Illinois, December 15, 1852 and is a son of Samuel A. and Sarah Jane (Harris) Holmes, the former a native of New York state and the latter of Illinois.  The father was a carpenter by trade.  Benjamin Holmes was but 14 years of age when he applied himself to the mason's trade and for over twenty five years was successful as a builder and contractor in Hampton.  In 1900 he entered the Johnson Optical College of Chicago, from which he received a diploma and also secured a permit from the state of Iowa as an examiner of the eyes.  He has since been engaged in the optical business.  On May 30, 1876, Mr. Holmes married Miss Lucy May Bailey, a native of Illinois, who bore her husband four children, all of whom passed away in Illinois in infancy.  Mrs. Lucy M. Holmes died August 23, 1882.  Mr. Holmes later married Miss Anna Moist, a native of Hampton, this marriage occurring July 14, 1884.  To them were born three children; Fay B. the wife of Albert Latham of Kansas; Guy B. of Fort Dodge, Iowa; and Ray S. of Texline, Texas. The mother of these children passed away and Mr. Holmes later married Mrs. Ida (Howes) Minnier, widow of Truman Minnier.  She is a native of Missouri but has lived in Franklin County ever since she was two weeks old.  Mr. Holmes is a Republican and member of the Christian Church.  He is highly esteemed by all who know him and has many friends in Hampton and the vicinity.”

       There are three examples of the work of this photographer in the SHSI collection.

 

HOOT, HOWARD S.

       Hoot had a studio in Waterloo, Black Hawk County, at E. 4th between Sycamore and Lafayette in 1886.  Was in partnership as Hoot & Read and stereographs probably came from this partnership.  Howard Hoot was also in Ames 1889–1892 and Waverly 1897–1899.  Cook & Hoot may have also run Jordan's Art Gallery in Waterloo.

       The name of this photographer was supplied by the NSA.  They thought he worked in the 1870s and 1880s.

 

HORTON, J. A.

       Horton had a studio in West Des Moines, Polk County.  The studio name was Horton & Co.  NSA reports “Portrait & View Photographers,” 210 6th Street West, who issued local scenery.  Burgess lists him as being there in 1881.

       There are three examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.

 

HOUGHTON, AMASA A.

       Houghton's studio was in Lansing, Allamakee County, in the 1880s.  Was in a partnership as Houghton & Powell.  This partnership is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as a Lansing firm.

       The name of this photographer was supplied by the NSA.  They thought he worked in the 1870s and 1880s.

 

HOPKINS, F. E.

       Hopkins had a studio in Wyoming, Jones County.  There are two views by Hopkins in the SHSl collection, one being a circus clown riding in a parade on the main street and the other an egg race by a fraternal group.  The back indicates a series of at least 35 views.  It is thought he worked in the 1890s.  He called his studio “The Wyoming Studio.”

 

HOVER, E. O. (1839–1916?)

     Hover had a studio in Decorah, Winneshiek County, in the 1880s.  Prominent series was “Views In and About Decorah, Iowa.”  Also was in West Union (1875–78) and New Hampton (1880).  May have died May 11, 1916 if the first name turns out to be Edwin.  Had a partnership called Hover & Wyer and this was the firm that produced the views.

     From History of Fayette County, Iowa, 1878, p. 585:  “Hover, E. O. photographic artist, Nefzgers Corner (West Union), upstairs; residence same; was born in Canton, Ohio, Oct 31, 1839, in 1846 came to Warren, Jo Davies Co., Illinois.  In April 1862, he enlisted in the 96th I. V. L. was wounded at Chickamauga, and in November 1863 was discharged on account of disability.  He re-enlisted in May 1864 (for three months) was mustered out in November 1864.  He was Commissary of the first Brigade of Cavalry during this service.  In 1870, Mr. Hover removed to Monticello, Iowa, came to West Union in 1875.  Married Sophronia M. Spencer, Jan 7, 1867; she was born near Cleveland, Ohio; they have had two children, both deceased.  Birdie E. died Oct. 29, 1876 age 8 years and 7 months and Freddie S. died Nov. 19, 1876, age 6 years and 1 month.  Mr. and Mrs. Hover are members of the M. E. Church.  Mr. Hover has been chorister of the M. E. Church in various places about twenty years.”

     There are nine examples of this photographic partnership in the SHSI collection.  They used backlists on most of his stereographs.  Thirty local scenes of Pleasant Hill, Court House, street scenes, hotels, homes, and the Ice Cave.  There is also a single view of his work in West Union.  This contains a backlist and is entitled,  A Series, Stereoscopic Journeys in and about West Union. The backlist mentions views from Auburn, Otter Creek, and Burnham’s Mill.

 

HOYT

     Hoyt had a studio in Sac City, Sac County.  Unsure of any relationship with B. F. Hoyt in Manchester or Charles Franklin Hoyt in Sioux City.

     An example of his work has been seen by collectors.

 

HOYT, B. F. (1853–1902?)

     Hoyt had his studio in Manchester, Delaware County.  Prominent series include “Iowa Beautiful Iowa” and “Views of Delaware County.”  Name may have been Brooks Hoyt.  From the Manchester Press of June 26, 1902:  Hoyt was “...partially delirous, however, following the operation, and Thursday night pneumonia, which is almost always fatal at high altitude, set in, causing his death Friday night about midnight.  His half brother, W. D. Hoyt, of this city arrived in Cripple Creek [Colorado] at eleven o'clock on the morning of his death.  The sufferer recognized him but communication between the two was impossible.  Mr. Hoyt brought the remains here on Monday, the funeral begin held from the Hoyt home on Union street that afternoon, Rev. H. W. Tuttle officiating.  B. F. Hoyt was born January 15, 1853 at Bellafontaine, Ohio, and was therefore 49 years of age.  His mother died when he was two years old, and he lived with an aunt in his native town until 1858 when he was five years of age.  In that year, his father was married to Mrs. Deliah Miller, one child, W. D. Hoyt, being born to them.  The year of their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Hoyt, accompanied by the five year od boy removed to this county, settling on the homestead near Dutchtown, north of this city a few miles.  Here Mr. Hoyt's boyhood was passed.  As a young man he graduated from the Iowa State University and from the Dakota School of Mining, devoting himself primarily to the study of geology and botany, in which branches he became remarkable proficient, so much so that during the absence of a professor in charge of these studies at Iowa City, Mr. Hoyt was secured to instruct the classes at the university.  Several years of Mr. Hoyt's life were spent in Nebraska and in southern states, in botanical and geological research, and during his extensive travels he accumulated a rare collection of photographic views.  His taste in this direction being exceptionally artistic and well defined.  In March 1899, he went to Cripple Creek, which continued his home until his death.  There he became interested in mining, and his ability as an assayer caused his services to be greatly in demand.  Mr. Hoyt's nature was one of singular frankness, genuineness and integrity.  He was a man of conspicuously clean life, of studious and scholarly habits and of honest and straightforward purposes.  He despised hypocrisy and insincerity, and his life was a pattern of simple, unvarying integrity and uprightness of character.  Beneath a reserve natural to his dispostion his friends found those qualities of heart and intellect which speak devotion to the best phases of life.  The sad death of Mr. Hoyt gives pain to all who valued his friendship and recognized the excellence and mainliness of his life.  Mr. Hoyt was never married, and is survived only by his half brother, W. D. Hoyt of this city.  Q. W. Miller of this city is a step brother of Mr. Hoyt.”

     There are six examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.

 

HOYT, CHARLES FRANKLIN (1842–?)

       Hoyt had a studio in Sioux City, Woodbury County, in the 1870s.  Had partnership as Hamilton & Hoyt.  One prominent series was “Corn Palace Interiors.”  A. T. Andreas Illustrated Historical Atlas of the State of Iowa, 1875, p. 551, lists him as having come to the state in 1867 and his place of nativity as being McDonough County, Illinois.  In the History of the Counties of Woodbury and Plymouth, Iowa, 1890–1891, pp. 1011–1012:  “Charles Franklin Hoyt, capitalist, Sioux City, was born in Tennessee, McDonough County, Illinois, November 13, 1842, and comes of old New England stock.  His grandfather and father, both of whom bore the name of Jonathon, were natives of New Hampshire, the latter being born in 1808; the former was noted as a very strong man, and often gave exhibitions of his prowess, in carrying great weights, at militia trainings.... Elizabeth Rowley, mother of Mr. Hoyt, was born in Syracuse, New York in 1819.  Our subject was reared on the farm and attended the common schools.  In his twenty-second year he set out with two companions for the mining regions of Idaho.  They took turns in driving the team so that each walked two thirds of the distance.  Mr. Hoyt spent three years prospecting and mining, in Idaho and Montana, with moderate success, and during this time he became noted for his ability in finding his way over the rugged, snowcapped mountains of that region.  He then spent three years in traveling, and during his wanderings he learned the art of photography.  In 1870 he came to Sioux City, and soon formed a partnership with J. H. Hamilton, which continued four years, in conducting a gallery.  Mr. Hoyt then engaged in the manufacture of vinegar and pickling materials in which he continued till 1890 being the founder of the Sioux City Vinegar and Pickling works.  He was also active in establishing the Sioux City Brick and Tile works, of which he is president, and is the founder of the Sioux City Stoneware works.  He is president of the Sioux Paving Brick company which is a growing and valuable industry.  Mr. Hoyt is largely interested in real estate operations in Sioux City, and is an extensive landholder in Kansas.  He laid out Highland, Springdale, Edgewood Terrace, and North Riverside, second filing.  He is a Member of the IOOF and the K. of P. Lodges.  He entertains liberal religious views, and politically is a democrat.  He served six years as a member of the city council, and an unexpired term as mayor, to which office he was elected for the succeeding term.  In 1871 Mr. Hoyt married Miss Martha Goldie, a native of Leroy, N.Y. and daughter of William Harris, of England.  They have five living children; Charles L., Frank A., Mattie, Harry and Edna.  Ralph, the fourth died in infancy.”

       Only listed once in the city directory, that being Hamilton & Hoyt having studio at 71 Fourth Street in 1875–76.

       There are eight examples of this photographic firm of Hamilton & Hoyt in the SHSI collection.  Two of them show members of a Native American nation.

 

HUBBARD, A. W.

       Stereographs were made by Hubbard of LaPorte City in Black Hawk County.  There are four in the SHSI collection.  He may have been an amateur using a stamped back mark.  The quality of the mounts and views are low.

 

HUDSON, JOSEPH L. (1828–1906)

       Hudson had a studio in Tama (City), Tama County, in the 1880s and 1890s.  A prominent series was “Stereoscopic Views, Tama City and Vicinity.”  Was also in Wyoming, Iowa, in 1865.  Tama County Democrat, August 23, 1906:  “Last Saturday J. L. Hudson went fishing, and while walking along the track near the reservoir was struck by an incoming train.  The usual signals were given by the engineer who evidently thought Mr. Hudson would step off the track before the engine reached him.  Mr. Hudson was very deaf and failed to hear the whistling, and was struck by the engine and had a leg broken at the hip.  He was an old gentleman and the injury and shock led to his death which occurred Sunday.  The train had nearly came to a stop before hitting the old man.”  He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as a Tama photographer.

       There are three examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.  There are backlists on the cards with numbers going to 59.

 

HUFFMAN, LATON ALTON

       L. A. Huffman learned photography from his father, P. C. Huffman and worked in his studio in Waukon, Allamakee County, in the early 1880s.  Imprints show, P. C. Huffman & Son.  He later went on to be a famous Western photographer.  From Photographing the Frontier by Dorothy and Thomas Hoobler, page 134-135:  “Morrow's successor at Ft. Keogh was Laton Alton Huffman, a young man of twenty-five.  When Huffman was eleven, his father operated a photographic studio in Waukon, Iowa.  Huffman learned his father's trade, but led a footloose early life.  He spent his teenage years working as a wrangler on horseback, became a surveyor for the Northern Pacific Railroad, and in 1878 worked in the photographic studio of Frank Jay Haynes at Moorhead, Minnesota.  At Ft. Keogh, Huffman received no salary as post photographer.  His income came from the sale of pictures.  He also doubled as a guide for hunting parties, sold buffalo hides, and started a small cattle ranch.  Hoffman's studio at the fort became a congenial gathering place for soldiers, scouts, and Indians who relished an hour or two of conversation with a drink and a cigar.”

 

HUFFMAN, PERRIN CUPPY (1832–1894)

       Huffman had a studio in Waukon, Allamakee County, in the 1870s through the 1890s. Was in partnership as Huffman & Barnard, Huffman & Son and P. C. Huffman & Lady.  His son, Laton, was the famous Montana photographer, L. A. Huffman.  A prominent series was “Northeastern Iowa Views.”  In 1870 census, he was 37 years old born in Ohio, married to Chasta M., aged 38, who is also listed as a photographer and was also born in Ohio.  Daughter Dell, aged 17, born in Ohio and son Laton aged 15, born in Iowa.

       From The Frontier Years: L. A. Huffman, Photographer of the Plain, 1955, p. 27:  “Laton Alton Huffman was born October 31, 1854, on a frontier farm near Castalia, Iowa.  His father, Perrin Cuppy Huffman, was the grandson of a German emigrant; his mother's maiden name was Chastina M. Baird.  Laton had no brothers and only one sister, Ardelle - or Dell as he usually called her.  His father moved to Waukon, Iowa, in 1865, where he opened a photographic studio.  Farm work in these times required both brawn and endurance, for the labor was heavy and the hours were often from daylight to dark, and since both father and son were of slight build it is not strange that the father sought a new occupation.  He (Laton) later returned home to work in his father's shop until he had learned the techniques of photography and then, when about 21 he opened a studio of his own in Postville.”

       There are seven examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection, four as Huffman & Barnard, one as P. C. Huffman, and two as P. C. Huffman & Son.

       A laudatory obituary appears in the Waukon newspaper in July 1894 explaining that Huffman died in “his studio on Saturday, July 7, 1894 at age 61 years, 11 months, and 16 days.

Mr. Huffman was born in Ashland County, Ohio, July 21, 1832 where he grew to manhood. September 21, 1851 he was married to Miss Chasta M. Baird.  They removed to Iowa and established a home near Castalia, Winneshiek Co., in 1854 and in 1855 they removed to Waukon, which has been his home ever since.  To them were born two children who survive him - Layton A., now residing in Miles City, Montana, and Della, wife of Alonzo A. Barnard of Waukon.  The companion of his early life died March 16, 1875 and August 12, 1880, he was married to Miss Susie R. Holmes at Lansing, who survives him.”

 

HUNT

   Hunt worked in partnership as Datesman & Hunt in Marshalltown, Marshall County.  There is one example of their work in the SHSI collection.

 

HUNTER, WILLIAM (1842–1910)

       Hunter's studio was in Keosauqua, Van Buren County, in the 1880s and 1890s.  Was in partnership as Fosnot & Hunter and views came from this partnership.  There is one example of the partnership in the collection at the SHSI.

       The name of this photographer was supplied by the NSA. They thought he worked in the 1870s.

 

HUTCHINGS, S. H.

       Little is known of this photographer.  He had a studio in Hamburg, Fremont County.  There was, according to Burgess, also a Hutchings in Villisca in 1880.

       The name of this photographer was supplied by the NSA.  They thought he worked in the 1870s and 1880s.  A single view has been reported, subject not recorded.

 

HUTTEBALLE, H. C.

   Hutteballe may have had a studio in Sac City in Sac County.  He published at least one view of a Sac City scene.  There is one view in the SHSI collection.  It is an identical view to one published on a stereo by Bert P. Mill in Correctionville.  The relationship between these two men is not known.

  

 

back to top

 

I

 

IDSO

       This may not have been a photographer but rather a merchant who sold views of Norway made by Martin Morrison of Ames.  More research needs to be done.  The partnership of this enterprise was called Peterson & Idso.

 

ILLINGSWORTH

       Illingsworth had a studio in Sioux City, Woodbury County.  Had a partnership as Gurnsey & Illingsworth.  This is not listed, however, in available city directories.

       From Photographing the Frontier by Dorothy and Thomas HoobIer, pages 128-129:

“William H. Illingsworth emigrated with his family from Great Britain and arrived in St. Paul, Minnesota, in 1850, when he was a boy of eight.  He learned photography as an apprentice in Chicago, and by the time he was twenty-two, he was listed as a photographer in the St. Paul City Directory.

       “In 1866, Illingsworth and his partner, George Bill, had traveled with the expedition of Capt. James L. Fisk to Montana to map a safe road for whites trying to reach the Montana gold fields overland.  The two photographers produced about thirty stereo views of military posts and Indian camps along the route.  They stopped at Fort Union, at the junction of the Yellowstone and Missouri rivers, and took the only known photographs of the fort, which was destroyed the following year.  Illingsworth and Bill's stereo views of the expedition sold well.  When Bill quit the business, the Fisk negatives were sold to John Carbutt, who sold stereo views made from them under his own name.

       “Illingsworth continued to operate a successful gallery in St. Paul.  He took hundreds of stereographs of Minnesota scenery and issued them as stereos.  When the opportunity came to travel with Custer's expedition, and to keep the negatives for his growing stereo business, he accepted eagerly.  Illingsworth traveled to Ft. Abraham Lincoln in time to leave with the expedition on July 2.

       “At times, Illingsworth apparently traveled far in advance of the expedition to allow himself time to transport his portable darkroom to the top of a hill or bluff, prepare his plates, and be ready to photograph the wagons as they streamed by hundreds of feet below.  His courage in traveling alone, when rumors at the fort had said that 5,000 Sioux lay in wait for them, must have impressed Custer.  Custer named one of the valleys they mapped “Illingsworth Valley.”

       “Illingsworth, back in St. Paul, was arguing with the government over possession of his negatives.  He finally won out, but the market for stereos was in a slump, and his business suffered.  Illingsworth showed a weakness for drink.  His wife, citing his bouts of drunkenness and his cruelty toward her, divorced him, a most unusual action at the time.  Finally, impoverished and alone, Illingsworth shot himself in 1893, leaving behind almost nothing but his collection of 1,600 negatives, a priceless heritage.”


       There is a possible example of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.

 

back to top

 

J

 

JACOBS, W. H.

 

   Jacobs was located in Eagle Grove in Wright County.  He probably worked in the late 1870s and 1880s.  There are two examples of his work in the SHSI collection.  Both show the train yards of Eagle Grove.

 

JACOBY, J. FRANK

       Jacoby had a studio in West Liberty, Muscatine County, in the 1890s.  Had partnership as Jacoby & Barnes.  This partnership created the stereographs, and there are five examples of this partnership’s work in the SHSI.  The name could be John Frank, who was later in Columbus Junction (1895–1898).

 

JAMES

       According to Burgess, Des Moines has the following James active as photographers: Thomas L. 1880–1891, Charles F. 1892+. and Thomas C., 1893–1897.  It appears that it was Thomas L. who produced stereographs.  Thomas James is the brother of William James who was a photographer and stereographer in Iowa City.  NSA says there was a partnership between Thomas L. James and F. W. Pratt in Des Moines in the 1870s.  This partnership is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer.  Views by James are rare, one seen is a studio pose of baby.

       There is an example of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection and also one by James and Pratt.

 

JAMES, WILLIAM HENRY (1857–1937?)

       William Henry James had a studio in Iowa City, Johnson County, from 1874 to 1909.  He was the son of John James, also a photographer.  Burgess lists James & Son; Mrs. Nancy James (wife of William); and N. W. James.  From the Iowa City Press Citizen, April 12, 1937: “W. H. James dies at 79.  Iowa City Photographer for 40 years passes in California.  Mr. William Henry James, former Iowa City Photographer until his retirement in 1909, Passed away in San Diego, California according to word received here.  He was 79 years old.  The remains will arrive in Iowa City Thursday morning and burial will be in Oakland Cemetery.  Mr. James was born in Providence, Rhode Island.  September 4, 1857 the son of John and Katherine James, natives of England, His father was a contractor by trade.  Mr. James came to Johnson County with his parents in 1870 was graduated form the local public schools and then took up Photography in Iowa City.  He operated a Photography gallery on Clinton Street until his retirement and then was engaged in taking care of his real estate holdings until moving to California for his health about 20 years ago.  Mr. James married Nancy W. Fairall, daughter of Mr. Samuel H. Fairall, former local judge and state senator and representaive, about 55 years ago.  She preceded him in death 25 years ago.  Two brothers-in-law, Messrs. George and Frank Fairall, of Iowa City are among the survivors.”

       From Leading Events in Johnson County Iowa History, 1913, p. 528:  “William Henry James born in Providence, Rhode Island, September 4, 1857, is a son of John and Katherine (Milward) James.  The latter was a native of England, and came to Providence, R. I. in 1867. Three years later he removed to Johnson County, Iowa, where for a time he carried on the business of a contractor. He afterwards took up photography and continued in this line until his death, which took place at Des Moines in 1882.  Mrs. James was also a native of England, and the couple were married in that country.  She died in 1893.  Our subject attended the public schools of Iowa City and when old enough to enter business took up his father's profession of photography, in which occupation he continued for thirty five years, most of the time in Iowa City.  He retired from active business May 1, 1909, and since that date has devoted his attention to his property interests.  Mr. James was married October 2, 1881, to Miss Nancy W. Fairall, a native of Iowa City, daughter of Judge Fairall.  They have no children.  His brother Tom and his sister, Nell, reside in Des Moines, Iowa.”

       NSA says James & Co. worked in Iowa City in the 1880s; trade card says, Double Camera, Two Likenesses at Once. James & Co. is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as a Iowa City photographer.

       There are five examples of this photographer’s work in the SHSI collection.

 

JARVIS, BENJAMIN (1836?–?)

       Jarvis had a studio in Marshalltown, Marshall County, in the 1870s and 1880s.  There was a partnership known as Manville & Jarvis and it was this partnership that probably produced the stereographs.  The federal census of 1880 says Jarvis was then 44 years old and was born in England.  His wife, Ida, was 32 and born in Illinois.  Children were Lucius, aged 14, born in Iowa, Blanche aged 13, and Grace aged 6, both born in Iowa.  From History of Marshall County, Iowa, 1878, pp. 560–561:  “Jarvis, Benjamin, photographer born in England  Oct. 1, 1835; came to America about Jan. 1, 1855; he lived in Germantown, Philadelphia, and came to Iowa in 1857, and was engaged in building.  He was in the army; enlisted in the 5th I.V.I., Co. D., under Capt. Rice, he was in the battles of Iuka, Champion Hills, in the siege of Vicksburg and taking of Jackson; was wounded at the battle of Champion Hills.  He has been engaged in his present business four years and a half.  He married Miss Ida L. Bishop, from Illinois, in 1864; they have three children--Lucius E., Blanche A. and Grace B.

       NSA says rare views of local scenery.  He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as a Marshalltown photographer.  There is an example of the work of the partnership of Manville & Jarvis in the SHSI collection.

 

JESSUP, S. E.

       Had studio in Marshalltown, Marshall County, in the 1890s.  Was in partnership as Beverage & Jessup and stereographs were probably produced from this partnership.

 

JOHNSON, JOHN E.

       Had studio in Sioux City, Woodbury County, the the late 1880s and early 1890s.  There was also a Charles O. Johnson in Sioux City from 1892 to 1899 and he was a photographer.  Johnson was first listed in city directories in 1887–88 with studio at 705 Fourth Street.  This continues through 1891–92.  NSA says he had a series on the Corn Palace.

 

JOHNSON, P.

       Little information is available on this photographer.  His studio was in Rockford, Floyd County.

       The name of this photographer was supplied by the NSA.  They thought he worked in the 1870s.

 

JONES, C. E.

       Jones had a studio in Davenport, Scott County.  May have been located at the corner of 3rd and Brady Streets.  Name may have been George E. with studio at Third & Perry in 1882–1883.  Davenport city directories do not list a C. E. Jones.  NSA also reports that he was in partnership with Elliot in Davenport in the 1870s.  They report a view of a fruit store in the 1870s.

       There are two examples of Jones in Davenport in the SHSI collection.  No first name is given.  NSA has him listed in the 1870s.  There is one example by Jones and Elliott in the SHSI collection.

 

JONES, J. G. F.

       Had studio in Muscatine, Muscatine County in the 1880s.  According to the NSA, he issued “Western Stereoscopic Views,” “Muscatine, Iowa,” “Arkansas Valley, A Series,” “Wichita, Kansas.”  Backlists number to eighty; views scarce.

 

JONES, PAUL B.

       Had studio in Davenport, Scott County, from 1865 to 1870 according to Burgess.  A P. B. Jones was at 2nd & Main in Davenport in 1865 according to the Directory of Civil War Photographers.

       Davenport city directories list Paul B. Jones as working in Davenport from 1865 to 1867 at the southeast corner Second & Main.  The stereographs in the SHSI collection by Jones are from a series on the Old Settlers on Rock Island taken in September 1869.

 

JONES, WESLEY

       Jones may have been a photographer or a publisher of stereographs in Burlington, Des Moines County.  Pirated views of non-Iowa scenes have been seen that list his name.  He is not listed by Burgess.

 

JORDAN, HENRY A. (1837–?)

       Jordan had studio in Cedar Falls, Black Hawk County, in 1870s and 1880s.  He also had studios in both Vinton, Waterloo, Cedar Rapids and was later also in Dubuque.  He seemed to produce stereographs in Cedar Falls and Vinton and perhaps in the other cities as well.  The History of Black Hawk County, Iowa, 1878, pp. 499–500, reports:  “Jordan, H. A., photographer, Main St. residence same place; born Oct. 8, 1837, in Norwich, Conn. in 1847 came to New Haven Conn.  In 1863 came to New London, Connecticut, in 1866 came to Syracuse, N.Y. in 1874 removed to Benton County, Iowa, in 1876 came to Cedar Falls.  He commenced his business when a boy, and has followed it since continually, when in Syracuse he was running seven galleries in different cities at the same time, this is the leading gallery in the county.  Married Mary L. Johnson Oct. 31, 1858. She was born May 2, 1840 in Hartford, Connecticut.  Have three children, Eugene H., Cora H. and Annie M.  Are members of the Congregational Church.”

       Also had studio in Vinton, Benton County, in the 1870s.  Gallery on Washington Street, Opposite the Post Office.  Had partnership as Jordan & Macy, J. L. and H. A. Jordan, Syracuse N.Y.  The A. T. Andreas Illustrated Historical Atlas of the State of Iowa, 1875, p. 532, lists him as a Vinton photographer from New London County, Vermont, who came to Iowa in 1874.  Also had studios in Dubuque as Jordan Art Studio in 1880s and 1890s.

       There are examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection; six are from Cedar Falls and feature both Jordan and Jordan & Macy, there are also three and a pirated western view from the Vinton studio.  One of the cards has a very unusual engraving backmark of the Cedar Falls studio on the back of the stereograph and a cabinet card with an engraving of his Dubuque studio on the reverse also exists. Eight views in the SHSI collection list Vinton as an address. Two stereographs from Syracuse, New York, show Jordan on a hobby horse and a family view.  Series included (as Jordan & Macy) “Stereoscopic Views of Cedar Falls & Vicinity.”  He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as being in Cedar Falls.

 

JULIUS, E. D.

       Julius had a studio in Manson, Calhoun County.

       There are three examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.

 

back to top

 

K

 

KELLETT, T. A.

       Kellett had a studio in La Porte City, Black Hawk County, in the 1880s.  Also a Sarah E., probably his wife, in La Porte City at the same time.  T. A. Kellett & Wife are listed as photographers in the 1881 Gazetteer for La Porte City.  One series was called, “Iowa Scenery”.

       An example of his work is in the SHSI collection.

 

KENNEDY, ARTHUR L.

       Kennedy had a studio in Newton, Jasper County, in the 1880s.  The partnership was called Barnes and Kennedy, and this partnership probably produced the stereographs.

       The name of this photographer was supplied by the NSA.  They thought he worked in the 1870s.

 

KEYSER

       Andrew J. Keyser produced stereographs in Belle Plaine, Benton County.  Used an embossed mount.  Examples of his work have been seen and are of local views of homes and horses.  He was in partnership with a brother and produced some views as Keyser Brothers. He was from a family of then children and it is not known which brother worked with him (Aaron, Henry, David, or Daniel).  Andrew Keyser was born in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, on February 26, 1866.  He was of the Lutheran faith.  He married Emma Fiene on December 25, 1888 and to this union were born four children; Maude (September 7, 1890), Grace (July 11, 1892), Hazel (July 18, 1895) and Lloyd (November 7, 1900).  In later years, Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Keyser lived at 1426 1st Avenue East, in Cedar Rapids.  Relatives of the Keyser family still live in Belle Plaine. There are three views by the Keyser Brothers in the SHSI collection.

 

KILBORN, WILLIAM FRANKLIN (1854–?)

       Kilborn had a studio in Cedar Rapids, Linn County, in the 1870s through the 1890s.  One studio was at 18 1st Avenue.  Also listed is a partnership with Rifenburg (Kilborn and Rifenburg).  There was also a Cedar Rapids photographer from 1864 to 1887 named Wilbur F. Kilborn (William's uncle) and a W. D. Kilborn in Nevada and Roland in 1892, according to Burgess.

       According to Biographical Record of Linn County, Iowa, vol 2., 1911, pp. 308–309:  “Mr. William Franklin ‘Frank’ Kilborn was born in Michigan sometime after 1832.  Mr. Kilborn was married at Lancaster, Ohio, September 4, 1884 to Miss Mary Carty, daughter of William J. and Ellen (Carpenter) Carty of that city.  Mrs. Kilborn is a lady of culture and refinement and an active worker in the church, social and literary life of Cedar Rapids.  They have two children: Mary Ellen, wife of Carl Richard Greer, editor of the Republican and News and Secretary of the Chamber of Commerce, of Hamilton, Ohio, and Paul Franklin, born June 17, 1897.  In 1908, Avalon, one of the most beautiful homes in Cedar Rapids, was erected by Mr. Kilborn at the corner of Washington Avenue and Seventeenth Street.  Here amid beautiful furnishings, which indicate refined and cultured taste, our subject and his wife entertain their many friends.  Mr. Kilborn is one of the leading members of St. Paul's Methodist Episcopal church, of which he is a trustee.  Mr. Kilborn is a pleasing and forceful speaker and is frequently called upon to address meetings in different parts of the state in connection with religious work.  He is known as one of the liberal contributors to every good cause and work.”

       There is also a biography of the uncle, Wilbur F. Kilborn, in the Portrait and Biographical Album of Linn County, Iowa, 1887.  He may have made some stereographs with his nephew.  Kilborn & Kilborn is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer.

       There are two examples of this photographer's work as W. F. Kilborn and Rifenburg in the SHSI collection and two by Kilborn alone and one by Kilborn and Kilborn.  There is also an engraving on the back of a cabinet card that shows his studio.

 

KILBOURNE, JAMES F.

       This man's name may be James E. Kilbourne, who had a studio in Tipton in the 1870s and 1880s.  He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as a Tipton photographer.

       The name of this photographer was supplied by the NSA (Darrah).

 

KING, JOHNSON P. (1849–1930)

       King had a studio in Waterloo, Black Hawk County, from 1881 to 1912.  He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as a Waterloo photographer.  He was at E. 4th between Sycamore & Lafayette in business with V. Simmons & Latier in 1886, also in 1886 as King & Wagner, E. 4th and Water; in 1899 at 926 Lafayette; in 1901 at 300 E. 4th; in 1906 with Simonson; in 1910 at 520 Saxon; and in 1912 at 536 Edwards.  Had prominent series of “Illinois Central Excursion South,” “Iowa Scenery - Waterloo and Vicinity,” and “Shiloh Fiftieth Anniversary, April 6 and 7, 1912.”  Was also in partnership with Simmons, Latier (Letteer) and King.  There was also a Jonathon P. in Waterloo 1880–1882 and 1887 and a Joseph P. in Waterloo in 1880 and a J. King in Festina in 1895.

       From the Waterloo Evening Courier & Reporter, October 2, 1920: “Mr. and Mrs. Johnson R. King , 426 Edwards Street, are celebrating their golden wedding today with their children and grandchildren about them.  They were married 50 years ago in Morgan County, Ohio.  Next week they start on a new honeymoon trip.  They will travel east and visit the place in Ohio where they were wedded and where some of their relatives and many of their former friends reside.  Mr. King was married on his twenty-first birthday.  His wife was 20 years and six months old.  They are both strong and well.


       “Mr. King is a photographer by profession.  He began taking pictures 49 years ago and has been at it ever since.  For 20 years he traveled about the country in a photographic car.  The car was hauled from place to place by horses.  Mr. King would remain until the people of the locamy were served and then move to a new location.  He has taken tens of thousands of pictures of people living in the scope of the country extending from Calmar, 75 miles northeast to Marshalltown, at the southwest.

       “His largest goup photographs were of audiences at the ampaitheatre at Chautauqua park.  Each shows 5,000 faces.  One was on Bryan day at the Chautauqua.

       “Mr. and Mrs. King moved to Waterloo 45 years ago.  Mr. King at once opened a photograph gallery in the stone building at Water and Fourth, just across from the Union Mill company's office.

       “Mr. and Mrs. King's children are as follows:  Harriet, wife of Willard J. Card, Kansas City, Mo.; Mrs. Lulu B. Merrian, Frank L. King and Mrs. Alice Rhinesmith, Waterloo.  They have four grandchildren.

       “All the children and grandchildren were expected for today's obervance with the possible exception of Mrs. Card.  Lewis King, father of J.P. King, was an early day hotelkeeper at Raymond.  He died five years ago at the age of 91 and was buried in Ohio.  He was a member of the Methodist church.  Joseph King, an uncle, who is 90 years of age, lives in Pasadena, Cal.  Joseph King, a brother, lives in Santa Rosa, California.”

       From the Waterloo Daily Courier, November 1, 1930:  Johnson P. King, Early Day Photo Man Dies At 81; Traveled Country in Wagon Studio; Longtime Member of I.O.O.F.

       “Johnson P. King, 81, pioneer resident of Black Hawk county, whose portrait photography was known thru-out northeastern Iowa in an early day, died at 9:45 a.m. Saturday at the home he shared with his daughter, Mrs. Lulu Merriau, 436 Edwards street, from complications of age.

       “Altho Mr. King was advanced in years, his death was unexpected, as he had been quite active until 10 days ago.

       “He was one of the city's first portrait photographers, being associated for many years with Vellas L. Simmons and James D. LaTier in a studio in a small stone building that occupied the present site of a cigar store at Fourth and Water streets.

       “Later he engaged in businses for himself and built a complete studio on wheels, for many years visiting towns within a radius of 65 to 75 miles from Waterloo, for in the early days photographers were located only in a few of the larger centers.  Mr. King would remain in a town two or three weeks, making his sittings and doing all of his developing and printing in his wagon studio.

       “Mr. King was born Oct. 2, 1849, on a farm in Morgan County, Ohio, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Lewis King.  At the age of 17 he came to Black Hawk County, hiring out to a farmer north of Waterloo.  As a young man he helped to break the fenceless virgin prairie on what is now the P.L. Friedley farm north of Waterloo.

       “After a few years of farming Mr. King took up the profession of photography and that remained his lifelong work.  He retired 15 years ago.

       “Mr. King's mother died when he was two years old.  His father came to Iowa 50 years ago and farmed for many years east of Raymond.  He died Oct. 16, 1916, at Waterloo.

       “Mr. King was a lifelong member of the Odd Fellows order, which was practically his religion, tho as a young man he had been a member of the Quaker church.  A few years ago he was presented with a 50-year jewel by Black Hawk lodge, No. 72, I.O.O.F.  He held all chairs in the local lodge, and also was a member of Temple Rebekah, No. 54, Canton Crescent, No. 17, and Waterloo Encampment, No. 51.

       “Surviving are four children, Mrs. Harriett Card, Des Moines; Mrs. Lulu Merriau, 436 Edwards street; Mrs. Alice Rhinesmith, Charles City, and P.L. King, 1315 Williston avenue; also four grandchildren, Melvin K. and Paul L. Merriau, 436 Edwards street, and Robert and Jane Rhinesmith, Charles City.

       “Funeral services will be Sunday at 3:30 p.m. in the Kistner chapel in charge of Rev. Thomas Shaffer, pastor of St. Paul's Methodist Episcopal church.  Black Hawk lodge, No. 72, I.O.O.F. will conduct the ceremony at the grave.  Burial will be in Fairview.”

       There is a stereograph of a King assistant working in a photo car in the SHSI collection.  NSA reports a series on “Illinois Excursion South 03,” a street view in Boone, and view taken in Iowa City.  There are ninety examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection and also two by Simmons, Latier, & King.

 

KIRK, HORACE P. (HOD) (1843-?)

       Kirk had a studio in Mason City in the 1870s and 1880s.  He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as a Mason City photographer.  Prominent series included "Views of Mason City and Vicinity" and "Scenery - Mason City and Vicinity."  His gallery in 1883 was above Hanford's Clothing Store -west side of Commercial Street.  A photo by Kirk of the Central School was displayed at the 1876 Philadelphia Centennial Exposition.

       From the History of Franklin and Cerro Gordo County, 1883:  “H. P. Kirk located in Mason City at the close of the war.  He opened his business in 1867, and has prosecuted it successfully since its inception.  He was born in Mahoning County, Ohio, May 21, 1843, and was raised on a farm, receiving a common school education.  In 1861, he enlisted for three months in the 14th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and was stationed in Western Virginia.  In February, 1862, he reenlisted in the 13th Illinois Cavalry, Company D, remaining about one year and receiving his discharge for physical disability.  In February, 1865, he enlisted a third time in the 2nd Iowa Cavalry and was in the service until the close of the war.  He was married in 1870 to Elizabeth R. daughter of S. C. Wordsworth, of Lake Mills, Iowa.  Mrs. Kirk was born in Ohio in 1852.  They have two children - Clara L. and Verne R.

       “Cerro Gordo County was in its infancy when Mr. Kirk came within its borders.  He has seen Mason City expand from a hamlet with three houses to a respectable city of 4,000 people.  He leads his profession in this vicinity, and his rooms are a delight to his patrons.  They are fitted up with admirable taste, and the evidences of the artists skill are to be seen on every hand.  H. R. Kirk purchased a gallery in 1867, of A. M. Thompson, and has been the only one engaged in this art since that time.  He occupies a fine building well supplied with modern apparatus, and also carries a complete stock of albums, picture frames, etc.”

       A successor photographer offers a further description in the Mason City Globe Gazette of August 11, 1928:  “Meet W. J. Helbling - Proprietor of Oldest Photograph Business in city, Started in Profession by Operating a Traveling Studio.  A covered wagon means more than a pioneer modium of transportation to W. J. Helbling, proprietor of the Kirk Studio, the oldest photograph studio in the city.  A crude ‘covered wagon’ constructed by Mr. Helbling, once served as his traveling laboratory where he dipped prints taken in his tent studio into toning solutions and produced Angela, Sepia, gold and platinum tones.  The reluctance with which he parted with his tent studio and traveling laboratory was second only to his sadness at leaving his studio in the L. W. Ray building above the old Patton Brothers clothing store.  The building is now being razed by the Kresge Company which will erect a new building.

       “Mr. Helbling, who was born in Clinton, came to Mason City in 1872 at the age of one year.  That was just two years after the railroads had pushed their steel tracks this far westward and Mason City was just beginning to show promise of developing into a metropolis.  Mr. Helbling's stepfather, George Sauerberg, was a brewer.  When prohibition went into effect, the family moved from north of the city near the brewery to a 12 acre plot situation just two blocks north of Mr. Helbling's present home at 604 Twelfth Street northeast.  He lived in a roofed dugout the first year before our home was built, says Mr. Helbling.

       “Little did the husky youth known as Bill dream as he passed H. R. Kirk's one story photograph studio that some day he would adopt that profession as his life work.  The Kirk studio, one of the first in the city and also one of the first brick buildings in the city, stood on the present site of the Park Inn Hotel.  Bill attended the old stone school house which was situated near the present Decker plant location.  It was one of Mason City's first temples of learning.  The same bell that called us to school now summons the Washington school pupils, says Mr. Helbling.  Later the magnificent stone Central school was erected and he attended school there at the time Professor Cotton was principal.  Bill did what most youths of that day did.  He labored - plowing corn, husking corn, putting up hay, putting up ice.  “Occasionally he worked in the Kirk Studio and it was there that he learned the developing formula which he still uses - a formula invented by H. P. Kirk.  The elder Mr. Kirk was a pioneer in the chemistry of photography, having started in business making the ancient tintypes and then the wet plate process and albumin printing out paper.  Photography fascinated Bill.  He was handy with tools and he constructed himself a 14 by 30 foot wooden room and mounted it on a wagon chassis.  This was his finishing room.  He was 27 years of age then and the idea of traveling even if it was just within a radius of 50 miles about Mason City appealed to him.  There were few photograph studios in those days.  ‘When I arrived in a town, I pitched my tent and the news traveled fast.’  Farmers in their denim, brides and bridegrooms, family groups, dimpled babies and wrinkled patriarchs posed for their pictures in the tent studio.

       “A piece of slate-colored cheesecloth in the roof of a tent produced a soft light which Mr. Helbling states was ideal for lighting.  Water was carried in buckets from the nearest well or spring to the tanks in the finishing room on wheels.  The printing out process utilizing daylight exposure was used.  The solutions were merely used to set the tones.  Mr. Helbling slept in the wagon and when he sought a more lucrative field he merely hired a span of horses and moved on to the next town.

       “Four years later Mr. Helbling married Anna Brenilson of Mason City.  A son, Don, who is now associated with his father in the Kirk Studio, was born.  The three of them continued traveling in the transportable photograph studio.  About 1900 Mr. Helbling started working with Vern Kirk who had succeeded his father in the Kirk Studio.  During the summer he continued to run his studio on wheels.  For a few years the two operated a summer tent studio at Clear Lake.  In 1914, Mr. Helbling purchased the studio from the Kirks and has since that time operated it in its location in the L. W. Ray Building.”

       There is an engraving on the back of some cabinet cards showing the Kirk Studio vault containing negatives.  There are thirteen examples of his work in the SHSI collection.

 

KLINE, E. R.

       Kline had a studio in Sioux City, Woodbury County.  He is not listed in Sioux City directories from 1871 to 1891.  Burgess does not list.

 

KODYLEK, JOHN

       Kodylek had a studio in Sioux City, Woodbury County, in the 1870s. He was in partnership as Hamilton & Kodylek.  A prominent series dealt with Native Americans.  He is listed in city directory of 1870 as Hamilton & Kodylek.

       The name of this photographer was supplied by the NSA. They thought he worked in the 1870s.

 

KRAMER, ISAAC W.

       Kramer had a studio in Des Moines, Polk County, in the 1880s and 1890s. There are two examples in the SHSI collection.  Both are of sites in Pennsylvania, where Kramer may have originated.

 

KRIEGE, FRED

   Kriege produced views in Le Mars in Plymouth, County.  There is a single view in the SHSI collection.

 

back to top

 

L

 

LANCASTER, HAHNEMANN

       Lancaster's studio was in Cedar Falls, Black Hawk County, in the 1880s and 1890s.  He was also in partnership at one time as Lancaster and Corey. He was a brother of Whilfield Lancaster.  He was also listed in Burgess as being in Waterloo in 1887.  The Lancaster Brothers won first prize in photography at the Iowa State Fair in 1884 and 1886.  The Grout Museum in Waterloo has an excellent stereo by Lancaster of a Meskwaki wikiup.

       This photographer's name was supplied by the NSA. They thought he worked in the 1880s.

 

LATIER, JAMES D. (1848?–1926)

       Latier had a studio in Waterloo, Black Hawk County, in the 1880s, 1890s, and early part of the twentieth century.  His name is also sometimes written as Letteer (some backmarks even spell it this way) and LaTier.  Was in partnership as Simmons & Latier, and Simmons, Latier and King.  May have been born in 1848 and died February 4, 1926.  There was also a James D. Latier in Clarksville in 1889, according to Burgess.  The Waterloo city directories list him as in business with V. Simmons, and J. P. King on E. 4th between Water & Sycamore, at 108 E. 4th in 1886; and  from 1899 to 1904, his studio was located at 510 Commercial.  There are thirteen examples of Simmons & Latier in the SHSI collection and two examples of Simmons, Latier & King.

 

LEACH, F. M.

       Had studio in Fort Dodge, Webster County.  A prominent series was “Views of Fort Dodge and Vicinity.”  He could be Frank M. who was also in Indianola (1866) and Perry (1880).

       There is an example of this photographer’s work in the SHSI collection.

 

LEISENRING, JAMES B.

       Leisenring had a studio in Fort Dodge, Webster County, in the 1870s and 1880s.  He was also in Mt. Pleasant and was a brother to the photographers there.  His wife might have also been part of this business in Fort Dodge.  His studio was established in 1873 and may have been one of the oldest in the city.  According to the Directory of Civil War Photographers, a J. B. Leisenring was in Mt. Pleasant in 1862–65 (Leisenring & brothers).  He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as a Fort Dodge photographer.

       This is an example of the work of this photographer in the SHSI collection.

 

LEISENRING, JOHN R., LEISENRING, W. KARE, and LEISENRING, JOSPEH

       The Leisenrings’ studio was in Mt. Pleasant, Henry County, from the 1860s to the 1890s.  James was later in Fort Dodge.  Leisenring Brothers photographed the Lincoln grandchildren.  They are listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as Mt. Pleasant photographers.  No stereographs by the Leisenring Brothers have been seen but there is evidence that they made stereographs.

 

LEWIS, M. C.

       Lewis had a studio in Des Moines, Polk County, in the 1870s.  There was a Melaucthon W. Lewis in Washington in 1865 according to the Directory of Civil War Photographers.

       There are two examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.  NSA reports that views are rare and of local scenery.  Most seen are somewhat amateurishly done; one of sea shell display, “South Seas Conchological Co.” with two men who look like owners.

 

LIBBY, EVELEN PORTER

       Libby had a studio in Keokuk, Lee County, in the 1860s through the 1880s.  Also listed, by Burgess, in Manchester in 1865.  Issued the series “Western Views.”  Some also seen by NSA members as being of Dubuque.  He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as a Keokuk photographer.

       There are fourteen examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.

 

LITTLE, ERNEST

       Little had a studio in Oskaloosa, Mahaska County.  Prominent series was “Camera Sketches of Iowa.”  Burgess also lists a Joel H. Little in Oskaloosa in 1878.  Number of a series seen as high as #97 from a “Sabbath School Picnic Series.”  There are eight local Oskaloosa views by Little in the collection at the SHSI, one of which shows Penn College.

 

LITTLE, HIRAM N.

       Had studio in Oskaloosa, Mahaska County.  Series included “American Views,” “American Gem Series - Over 1500 views of unrivaled artistic merit.”  Also had a series called “Glimpses of the Great West, Des Moines Series” and “Distinguished Indian Chiefs”.  May have also been in Des Moines in the late 1880s and 1890s.  His relationship to Ernest Little is unknown.  NSA reports “Selected by...,” “American Views,” backlists to 80+ general coverage, many are pirated; Niagara Falls, West Point, Naval Academy, Lake Superior, Lake George, etc.  Some of Iowa original such as two of Croton, Iowa (Lee County).

       There are seven examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.

 

LITTLEFIELD, CHARLES E.

       Littlefield had a studio in Anamosa, Jones County, in the 1880s.  He had backlists with 25 views of the Anamosa State Prision listed.

       There are three examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.

 

LOHRER, O. F.

       Lohrer was in Dubuque, Dubuque County, in the 1870s.  NSA reports that office was at 576 Main Street, a single view reported, pirated, of Yosemite.  He was possibly someone who advertised with stereocards rather than a publisher or photographer.  Burgess does not list him as a photographer.

       There is a pirated view in the SHSI collection (of the Devil's Bridge).

 

LOVELL, JOHN S. (1844?–?)

       LoveIl had a studio in Davenport, Scott County, in the 1870s and the early 1880s.  Davenport city directories list Lovell at 728 E.  Thirteenth from 1879 to 1883.  Prominent series were “The Great Grinnell Cyclone Views” and “Lovell's Stereoscopics of the Tri-Cities.”  Both of these series had backlists.  One backlist has 39 views of the 1881 flood in the Tri-Cities.  Also stereos of stone cutters at the Arsenal, street scenes in Davenport, etc.

       The 1880 federal census lists Lovell as being 36 years old, born in New York, and living at 1801 Main Street.  Has wife, Addie C. was 25 at that time and had been born in New York.  A daughter, Lila, aged 4, had been born in Michigan, and a daughter, Lela aged 2, had been born in Ohio.  There was, according to Burgess, also a John S. LoveIl in Council Bluffs in the 1890s.

       There are twenty-seven examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection, including many views from the Grinnell tornado series.

 

LUCAS, A. K.

       Lucas may have been a photographer or may have been a publisher of stereographs in Council Bluffs, Pottawatamie County.  One view has been seen of Washington, D.C.  It is not known if this is a pirated view or if he made any views of Iowa.  Burgess lists him in Council Bluffs in 1869.

 

back to top

 

 

M

 

MAC ARTHUR, M. H.

       Mac Arthur had a studio in Hopkinton, Delaware County, in the early 1900s.  He used the curved mount format. He may be listed under McArthur.  He had numbers to the 1500s but it is unknown exactly how many views he produced.

       There are eighteen examples of the work of this photographer in the SHSI collection.  Most are local views although some are of the new state institution building in Cherokee, quite a distance from Hopkinton but accessible by rail.

 

MACY, OLIVER W. (1850–?)

       Macy had a studio in Cedar Falls, Black Hawk County.  Burgess lists the following towns for Macy:  Vinton (1871–1874), Jordan & Macy in Cedar Rapids (1876), Belle Plaine (1878–1884), Vinton (1882–1899 and later), Dysart (1884), Cedar Rapids (1892–1895).  Also an Ira Macy listed in Brooklyn 1880–1882.  An ad in the Cedar Falls Gazetteer, May 26, 1876, announces:  “New Photograph Gallery! Jordan & Macy, Directly opposite Carter House Cedar Falls. Good work guaranteed on Cloudy or Rainy Days.”  Jo Ann Burgess has photo of his studio in Vinton.  Macy is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as being in Belle Plaine.  Had studio in Vinton, Benton County, in the 1880s.

       From Portrait and Biographical Album of Benton County, 1887, pp. 341–342:  “Oliver W. Macy, photographer, gallery located near S. H. Watson & Sons Bank, Vinton, is a son of John G. and Mary A. (Pearson) Macy, and was born in Miami County, Ohio, July 15, 1850.  His father was a native of North Carolina, a carpenter and cabinet maker by trade, and also a farmer.  He died in Iowa County, Iowa, in 1867, where he had a farm of 217 acres.  His mother is a native of Ohio, in which state they were married.  She resides with her children.  There were fourteen children, seven of whom are now living, the subject of this sketch being the ninth.  Mr. Macy was married while in business at Cedar Falls, at Greenville, Bond County, Illinois, to Miss Fraida Robert, daughter of James Robert, a farmer of that county, and a native of Switzerland.  Four children were born to this union, three of whom are now living - Eva L., Laura M., and Robert J. the deceased was Owen E.  Mr. Macy's wife died January 31, 1884.  He was again married in this county, near Belle Plaine, June 25, 1885, to Miss Lillian Wengert, daughter of Jacob and Elizabeth Wengert, born in Whiteside County, Illinois, March 13, 1864.  They have one child Fraida.  Mrs. Macy's parents are both old settlers of this county, and still reside near Belle Plaine, on their fine farm.”

       There are ten examples of this photographer's work as O. W. Macy or as Jordan & Macy; all list the Cedar Falls studio.

 

MANVILLE, W. A.

       Manville had a studio in Marshalltown, Marshall County, in the 1870s. Had partnership as Manville & Jarvis and stereographs were published using that name.  He is listed in A. T. Andreas Illustrated Historical Atlas of the State of Iowa, 1875, p. 535, as a photographer, being born in Jefferson County, New York, and coming to the state of Iowa in 1869.

       There is a single example of the work of this photographer in the SHSI collection.

 

MARTIN, J. PAUL (1846?–?)

       Had studio in Boone, Boone County, in the 1870s through the 1890s.  According to the 1880 federal census, he was 34 years old at the time, residing on Benton Street and had been born in Pennsylvania.  His wife's name was Maggie A. and she was 33.  They had three daughters, Kittie L. (8), Anna M (6) and Jessie P. (10 or 12).  All three had been born in Iowa.  Also listed in their household was Kate Walker Thouser, aged 15, from Pennsylvania.  NSA also reports him being from Tama City.

       There are three examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.

 

MATHER, HENRY S. (1836–1908)

       In the History of Cerro Gordo County, 1883, pp. 796-797, it states:  “The first regular photographer was G. H. Roe, who came in 1874.  A little later came S. Slocum.  In 1883 the business was carried on by H. S. Mather.

       H. S. Mather, photographer, established his business here in 1881, and is the only representative of his art in the city.  He is a good artist and thoroughly competent to excel in all branches of his business.  He has recently erected a new building with excellent arrangements for first-class work.  He makes a specialty of stereoscopic views of Clear Lake and vicinity and has constantly on hand an assortment of views of the Lake, village and camping ground.  Mr. Mather is a native of Cazenovia, N. Y., and was born in 1836.  He studied the technique of his art at Morrisville, N. Y., and has pursued his present calling since 1865.  His  wife, Jennie (Slocum) Mather, is also a native of Cazenovia.”

       From the Clear Lake Mirror, October 8, 1908:  “Word had been received of the death of H. S. Mather at Littleton, Colorado, where he moved a few years ago.  Mr. Mather was an early day photographer of Clear Lake coming here in 1881 from Cazenovia, New York.  Mrs. Mather survives him.  They had no children but an adopted daughter, Maud, who married Lew Matson and their son Harry had made his home with the old folks.”

       NSA reports series entitled “Views in and Around Clear Lake, the Great Summer Resort of the North West.”  Also some views bear the name Cedar Lake, but no post office with this name ever existed, so may have been misprint on mount.  Mather also made at least one trip to his home state of New York and took stereographs of sights on the trip.  One such view of the Brooklyn Bridge exists in the SHSI collection.

       There are fifty-five examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection, including a view of his studio, his studio residence and skylight, a unique image taken from his living room..

 

MC ADAM, JAMES and MC ADAM, WILLIAM A.

       Brothers had a studio in Mt. Pleasant, Henry County, in the 1870s and 1880s.  The firm was known as McAdam Brothers.  The name could also be McAdams.  James later in Oskaloosa in 1891 and Ottumwa in 1895–1897.  William was in Webster City in 1889.

       The names of these brothers were supplied by the NSA.  They report that their studio was called “Mammoth Photographic Studio,” and only a single view has been reported. 

 

MC CARTY, J. H.

       Probably an amateur in Hiteman, Monroe County.

       There is a single example of the work of this photographer in the SHSI collection.

 

MC KAY, ARTHUR L.

       Mc Kay had a studio in Decorah, Winneshiek County.  NSA also reports having seen a view made from his studio in Cresco (1887–1891).  Prominent series was entitled “Snow Bound.”  May also have been in Council Bluffs in 1889.  A William McKay is listed in Garnavillo in 1865, according to the Directory of Civil War Photographers.

       There are sixteen examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.  He used backlists, listing nine views, on his Snow Bound series.

 

MC MANUS, C. C.

       Mc Manus had a studio in Nevada, Story County.  He was also listed, according to Burgess, in Des Moines 1864, Clear Lake 1864, and a McManus in Oxford 1887.  According to the Directory of Civil War Photographers, C. C. McManus was in Des Moines in 1864 and in Clear Lake in 1864.

       The name of this photographer wsa supplied by the NSA. They thought he worked in the 1870s.  A single view has been reported of a city storefront.

 

MELENDY, C. B.

       Melendy's studio was located at W. S. Main between 2nd and 3rd in Cedar Falls, Black Hawk County, in 1874.  He had a series entitled “Views of Cedar Falls & Vicinity.”  Was also known to have been in Dubuque.

       There are three examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.

 

back to top

 

MILES, JOSEPH A.

       Miles worked in Belle Plaine, Benton County, during the 1880s.  He had a partnership with William F. Greenlee (Miles & Greenlee).  The partnership had many views of “Jumbo” artesian well.

       There are four examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.  NSA reports that views are scarce, all seen are of “Jumbo” artesian well.

 

MILES, WM.

       William Miles had a studio in West Branch, Cedar County.  There are three examples of his work in the SHSI collection.  Also, according to Burgess, a William Miles was in Oskaloosa in 1864–1866.

 

MILL, BERT P.

       A little is known about this photographer, who was active in Correctionville, Woodbury County.  He used an early 1900s format on his stereographs.  NSA reports that “Views by...” and “Stereoscopic Photos” scarce but often interesting views of Idaho Falls Scenery, people fishing, sheep and wool.  Bert P. Mill went to Idaho Falls from Correctionville, Iowa, in 1905 and bought a half interest in the Idaho Falls Times, a struggling daily housed in a brick building on the west end of Broadway. Because Bert Mill had 20 years of newspaper experience, he was able to make a financial success of the troubled daily newspaper.  He and his wife became active in civic affairs.  He was one of the first members of the Commercial Club which was organized in 1907.  He supported the Republican Party in his editorials, and was especially interested in agricultural development.  Mrs. Mill was a member of the Village Improvement Society, a group of women determined to bring a semblance of refined civilization to the raw frontier town.  They were responsible for building sidewalks, establishing parks, planting trees, and starting a hospital and library.  Mrs. Mill was on the first public library board in 1908.  When Bert Mill bought the Times in 1905, Idaho Falls had a population of 1500.  By the time he sold the paper in 1915, the city had grown to about 5000.  In 1915 Bert sold the paper to Sam Dennis and William Snyder.  He and his family moved to California, noting that Idaho winters were just “too much”.  Photo seen of Correctionville football team in the summer of 1900 identifies him as a member of the team.  He was also a photographer in Idaho Falls, Idaho.

       There are six examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.

 

MILLER, CLINTON U.

       Miller had a studio in Davenport, Scott County, in the 1880s.  Called Miller & Co. or C. U. Miller & Co.  Collectors have seen a Clinton U. Miller stereograph with studio at corner of Third and Brady Streets.  Miller & Co. is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as a Davenport firm.

 

MILLER, JACOB W. (1841–1907)

       The Miller studio was in Anamosa, Jones County, during the 1870s and 1880s. He had a series of views on the Anamosa prison.  There was also a Jacob W. Miller in Mechanicsville in 1864–65 according to the Directory of Civil War Photographers.

       There are twenty-five examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.

 

MILLS, CHARLES B. (1838–1924)

       Mills had a studio in Manchester, Delaware County, in the 1870s through the 1890s.  A prominent series was “Views in and Around Clear Lake.”  He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as a Manchester photographer.

       There are forty examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection including several from the Clear Lake series.  There is also an image in the collection that shows Mills’ photo wagon.

 

MITCHELL, C. W.

   Mitchell’s studio was in Monticello in Jones County.  His gallery was located at the corner of 1st and N. Cedar Streets.  He made local views and there is one example of his work in the SHSI collection.

 

MONFORT, ASCHYLUS (1846–?)

       Monfort had a studio in Burlington, Des Moines County, in the 1860s through the 1890s.  He was in partnership with George Hill ( Monfort & Hill) and known stereographs have come from this partnership.

       According to the History of Des Moines County, Iowa, 1879, p. 652:  “Montfort, A. W. of the firm of Montfort & Hill photographers, was born in Chautauqua Co., N. Y. May 13, 1846; his parents removed with the family to Canada when he was an infant, lived there about five years, then removed to Detroit where he lived twelve years; in 1865, he came to Burlington; has been engaged in present business ever since he came here.”  The 1880 federal census lists Aschylus, aged 34, a woman born in New York named Mary L. who was 54 and a daughter named Belle who was 14 and born in Michigan.  He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as a Burlington photographer.

       There are four examples of the work of Monfort & Hill in the SHSI collection.

 

MOONEY, JOHN ARTHUR (1857–?)

       Mooney had a studio in Charles City, Floyd County, in the 1880s and 1890s.  He was in partnership with Harwood (Harwood & Mooney) and known stereographs have come from this partnership.  They had a prominent series entitled “Camp Wildwood” (25 views) and also “Views on and about the West and East Okoboji and Spirit Lakes” (35 views).  Also had a studio in Independence in 1880.

       According to the History of Floyd County, Iowa, 1882, p. 652:  “John Arthur Mooney was born in Rockford, Illinois, October 10, 1857, and came with his parents to Charles City in 1873.  He learned the art of photography with J. E. Rich with whom he remained seven years.  He then went to Independence, Iowa, and engaged in the photographic business a short time, but subsequently returned to this city and formed the present partnership, under the firm name of Harwood & Mooney.”

       There are twenty examples of the work of Harwood and Mooney in the SHSI collection.  There are also two different backlists for each of their two prominent series.

 

MOORE

       Moore had a studio in Newell, Buena Vista County.  Burgess does not list him.

       There is a single example of the work of this photographer in the SHSI collection.  This view may have been created using a cabinet card, which was not meant for stereographic images.  Moore may not have made many views.

 

MORAN, EDGAR

       Moran had a studio in Ackley, Hardin County.  Burgess lists him as being in Ackley in the 1860s through the 1880s.  He was later in Red Oak, Montgomery County, in the 1890s.  A view by Moran has been seen in a private collection.

 

MORGAN, G. W.

       Morgan had a studio in Lansing, Allamakee County, in the 1860s and 1870s.  There was also a Morgan & Hoover in Lansing in 1865.

       The name of this photographer was supplied by the NSA (Darrah).  They thought he worked in the 1860s.

 

MORLAN, MICAZAH M.

       Morlan had a studio in Clinton, Clinton County, in the 1880s.  He was in a partnership called, Morlan & Nichols and views came from this partnership.  NSA reports local views, rare.

       There are two examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.

 

MORRISON, MARTIN (1860–1895)

       Morrison's studio was in Ames, Story County, and a stereograph of his home, and also of Morrison and his camera do exist.  Burgess listed him as working from 1884 to 1891. Morrison was born in Norway in the city of Stavanger on March 28, 1844.  His wife was named Bertha and she was also from Norway.  They had six children; three boys and three girls.  He was a photographer but was also a woodworker.  He also sold many images of Norway through a Story City, Story County, firm, due to the county’s large Norwegian immigrant population.  An interesting trademark in many of his views was a sign that showed the date and the name of the family he was photographing that he placed in the foreground of the photo.  NSA says “Views of Norway” issued many on curved mounts, unclear whether he actually went to Norway or used a Norwegian photographer to make views there on order.  Iowa views show parlor with phonograph, farmyard, etc.

       There are thirteen examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.

 

MOSHER

   Mosher had a studio in Waterloo, Black Hawk County, in the 1880s.  The SHSI has one stereograph that was produced by this photographer.

 

MOTT, MERRITT MORGAN (1844–1910)

       Mott had a studio in Anamosa, Jones Couny.  His daughter, Catherine, was also a photographer.  He called his studio the New Excelsior Gallery at one time and also the Union Picture Gallery.  A prominent series was “Prison Views” (views of the Anamosa men's prison).  His studio was on Main Street in Anamosa at the corner of the City Park.  He had vascular heart trouble and died on February 26, 1910 at age of 66 years and 5 days.

       From the History of Jones County, 1910, pages 431-432:  “Merritt Morgan Mott, who is one of the oldest photographers of Anamosa, was born in Cortland County, New York, February 21, 1844, his parents being Philander and Harriett (Poe) Mott.  Also natives of New York, the former born December 29, 1816, and the latter September 16, 1823.  His paternal grand-parents were Jeremiah and Lydia (Messinger) Mott, who maintained the reputation held by this family as being very long lived, for different members have closely approached the hundredth milestone before their lives were brought to a close.  Philander Mott and his wife came to Iowa in 1865, locating in Fairview, where he engaged in the brokerage business. He dealt largely in tax titles and obtained a gratifying income from his operations.  Like others of his name he lived to an advanced age, for he had tolled off eighty-eight years before he was called to his final rest.

       “Merritt Morgan Mott came to Iowa a few years before his parents, and established himself in the town of Fairview in 1862.  There he followed the blacksmiths' trade, which he had learned in the east, but, being of an artistic temperament. gave it up to pursue the photographic art, which was at that time just beginning to come into the prominence it enjoys at present.  As progress has been made in the business he has advanced until he is now able to produce work which may well stand beside that turned out in other and larger cities. His success is in part due to the fact that he is his own most severe critic, for with the true instinct of an artist he is satisfied with the best only.  On many an occasion it is related of him, he has refused to let work leave his shop because it did not satisfy his exacting taste, although his customer found in it nothing to criticise.  Endowed with a keen love of art, and a discrimination in the choice and posing of subjects, he has won a success that equals that attained by promi­nent men in other parts of the country.  His reputation as well as the long period of his residence here.  Amounting to more than forty-seven years, entitle him to the fair name he enjoys as a workman and the respect in which he is held by all those who have come in contact with him, for a high code of honor has guided him in his business dealings as a high grade of achievements in his art has been his ambition.

       “In 1863, Mr. Mott wedded Miss Elizabeth Cromwell, who was descended from a branch of the family to which the Protector of England Oliver Cromwell, belonged.  Two children were born of this marriage: Catherine. who be-came the wife of William Richardson: and Wallace A., who married Miss Katie Coon and resides in Hale township.  After the death of his first wife, Mr. Mott married Miss Amelia Taylor, a daughter of John and Jane Taylor, both natives of the state of New York.  Two of the children born of this marriage now survive, John and Mamie.  The latter became the wife of Gustus Wilson, of Colorado Springs, Colorado, and they have two children.  Mrs. Amelia Mott has also passed away.

       “Since his young manhood Mr. Mott has consistently voted the democratic ticket, as he has believed in the value of the doctrines advocated in its platform.  He has for a number of years been connected fraternally with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, being now an honorable member of the local lodge.”

       Burgess also lists a Mariet M. Mott as being a photographer in Anamosa from 1880–1882.  There are twenty-six examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.

 

MOXLEY, ALMON E.

       From the Boone County Democrat, June 5, 1903:  “Almon E. Moxley of this city and Miss lna Sacks of Ogden were united in marriage at the home of the bride's parents in Ogden Friday evening.  The wedding was a quiet one and was witnessed only by intimate friends and relatives of the contracting parties.  The groom is a well known young man of this city and a son of Mr. and Mrs. B. R. Moxley. He is a member of the firm of Moxley & Coons, who recently took over the Knowlton Studio.  Mr. Moxley is considered an artist and photographer of much talent.  His bride is a well known and popular young lady of Ogden. They will reside in this city.”

       This photographer's name was supplied by the NSA.  They said views by him were scarce but seen with numbers to 69.  Views of unidentified city streets, cats in tree, and one of a mirage at Arapaho, Colorado.  Also made trick photos of himself and woman (Anna Belle Grey) nude from waist up, with 2 heads, wide torsos, woman with 3 breasts; startling and very well executed.  They thought he worked in the first decade of this century and used a curved mount format.

 

MUELLER, JOS.

       Had studio in Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie County in the 1860s and 1870s.  Also is listed, by Burgess, as having been in Neola.  Jos. Mueller's studio may be shown On stereograph in his series “Views of Council Bluffs and Vicinity.”  Was in Council Bluffs in 1865 according to the Directory of Civil War Photographers.  “Views of Council Bluffs & Vicinity” was the major series.

       There are three examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.

 

back to top

 

N

 

NEFF

       Had studio in Pella, Marion County.  Partnership as Scarff & Neff.  Burgess does not list.

 

NELSON, N. A.

       Nelson had a studio in Dike, Grundy County, in the 1890s.  Issued rare local scenery views on curved mounts. There is one example in the SHSI collection.

 

NEWBURY, C. S.

       Studio may have been in Davenport but might also be a Rock Island, Illinois, photographer.  He worked for the Western View Company of Rock Island, Illinois, during the 1870s and 1880s.  A prominent series was “Stereoscopic Views of Davenport and Vicinity.”  He is not listed in the Davenport city directories.

       There are twenty views by Newbury in the SHSI collection, all by the Western View Company of Rock Island, IL.

 

NEWTON, JOHN J.

       Newton had a studio in Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie County, in the 1880s.  NSA reports that only views reported are of tornado.

       There is an example of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.  It is of tornado damage.

 

NICHOLS, GEORGE B.

       Nichols had a studio in Clinton, Clinton County, in the 1880s.  He had a partnership called Morlan & Nichols.

       There are two examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.  Both are by the partnership.

 

NICONLIN, JOSEPH F.

       The Niconlin studio was in Algona, Kossuth County.  According to Burgess, he worked in the decades of the 1870s through the 1890s.  Have also seen his name spelled Nicoulin.

       An example of this photographer's work has been seen in a private collection.

 

NORTON, A. C.

       Norton had a studio in Monona, Clayton County, in the late 1880s and 1890s.

       There are two examples of the work of this photographer in the SHSI collection.  Darrah also reported having seen a view.  They felt he worked in the 1870s and 1880s.

 

NOTT, ARTHUR

       Nott had a studio in Maquoketa, Jackson County, in the 1870s and 1880s. There are two examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.

 

back to top

 

O

OBERHOLTZER, J. W.

       Oberholtzer had a studio in Webster City, Hamilton County, in the early 1880s.

       There are two examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.

 

O’DONOCH

   Spelling of this photographer’s name may be incorrect.  This or a similar name had a studio in Grand Junction in Greene County.  There is an example in the SHSI collection but the name is unclear.  He may have been an amateur.

 

OLMSTEAD, PHILANDER 0.

       Olmstead had a studio in Davenport, Scott County, in the 1860s and 1870s.  The Davenport city directories list him at Brady between 2nd and 3rd in 1866, and 74 and 76 Brady in 1867 and 1873. There is also a Olmsted & Morse listed in 1874–75 on Brady.  He is listed in Davenport in 1865 according to the Directory of Civil War Photographers.

       The name of this photographer was supplied by the NSA.  They said he advertised a “Photograph and Gem Gallery,” and that he produced scarce local scenery.

 

ORR

       Orr had a studio in Columbus Junction, Louisa County, in the 1860s through the 1890s.  He was in a partnership called Thomas & Orr.  This partnership is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as being in Columbus Junction.

       The name of this photographer was supplied by the NSA.

 

ORVIS, JAMES R.

       Orvis had a studio in Fayette, Fayette County, in the 1880s and 1890s.  There is an example of his work in the SHSI collection.  Burgess also lists him in Decorah and West Union, and Brush Creek (1880s).  He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as a Fayette photographer.

 

OWENS, M. W.

       Owens had a studio in Washington, Washington County, in the 1870s.  In 1878 he sold his studio to another stereographer, Samuel McDowel Armstrong.  Burgess lists a M. W. Owens in Muscatine in 1886–1889, and an M. W. Owens in Davenport in 1890–1891.  These may have been cities that he went to after leaving Washington.  His name has also been seen listed as Owen.  Although no stereographs exist in the SHSI collection by Owens, the NSA members have reported seeing a single view by Owens with the Washington address.

 

OYLOE, GILBERT G. (?–1927)

       Oyloe had a studio in Ossian, Winneshiek County, in the 1880s and 1890s.  He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as an Ossian photographer.

       The name of this photographer was supplied by the NSA (Darrah).

 

back to top

 

 

P

 

PALMER

       Little is known of this photographer.  He had a studio in Lansing, Allamakee County.

       The name of this photographer was supplied by the NSA (Darrah).  They thought he worked in the 1870s.

 

PALMER, S. D.

       Palmer had a studio in Marshalltown, Marshall County, in the 1880s.  He is reported to have issued rare views of local scenery.

 

PARKER, DAMASCUS

       Parker had a studio in Humboldt, Humboldt County, in the 1870s through the 1890s.

       There are three examples of the work of this photographer in the SHSI collection.  Darrah also reported having seen a view.

 

PARSON, J. R.

       Parson had a studio in Wheatland, Clinton County. There is an example of his work in the SHSI collection.

 

PEAVEY, LOUIS

       Peavey had a studio in McGregor, Clayton County, in the 1880s.  A single view has been reported by the NSA, it is a portrait of man wearing fraternal garb.  Burgess lists him in McGregor in the 1860s and also in Ossian and Decorah during the 1860s.

 

PERRY, HENRY B.

       Perry had a studio in LeMars, Plymouth County, in the 1880s.  There also was a Charles Perry in Sheldon in late 1890s.  NSA reports a single view seen that of a business street scene.  He had partnership as Perry & Colman in the 1880s in LeMars.

       There are three examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.  One is a street scene during the paving of the street.

 

PHELPS, JOSEPH P.

       Phelps had a studio in Muscatine, Muscatine County, in the 1860s–1890s.  There was also in Muscatine a C. F. in 1883, Frederick 1884–87, Lorenzo A. in 1887 and Lousia J. in 1891.  Relationships unknown.  Phelps is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as a Muscatine photographer.

       The name of this photographer was supplied by the NSA.  A view was also reported by Darrah.

 

PHILLIPS, J.

       Little information is available on this photographer.  He had a studio in Fort Madison, Lee County.  According to the Directory of Civil War Photographers, there was a John G. Phillips in New London in 1865.

       The name of this photographer came from the NSA.  They thought he had worked in the 1870s.  Views are rare, according to NSA, two have been seen, both of same unidentified home and group of people.

 

PHILLIPS, L. H.

       Phillips had a studio in Independence, Buchanan County, in the 1880s and 1890s.  A prominent series was “Views of Devil's Backbone Park” which included a backlist.  Another prominent series was entitled “Views of Iowa Scenery.”

       There are six examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.  The backlist is entitled “Views of Devil's Back Bone.”  There are 26 listed views and it is called the “First Series.”

 

PIERCE, NORMAN E.

       Pierce had a studio in Waverly, Bremer County, in the 1870s through the 1890s.  Also, according to Burgess, he was in Hopkinton in 1878.  There was a Charles in Waverly in 1892 and a Daniel C. in Waverly in from 1889 to 1891 or later.

       Two examples of this photographer’s work exist at the public library in Waverly.  The name of this photographer was supplied by the NSA (Darrah).

 

PINCKNEY, J. W.

       Little is known of this photographer.  He had a studio in Sioux City, Woodbury County.

       The name of this photographer was supplied by the NSA (Darrah).  They thought he worked in the 1870s.

 

POST, A. B.

     Post had a studio in Ottumwa, Wapello County, in the 1870s and 1880s.  He had partnership as Green & Post in the 1880s in Ottumwa.  His studio was also called A. B. Post & Co.

     There is an example of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.  It is by Post himself, not the partnership. It is a view of part of the town.

 

POWELL

     Powell had a studio in Lansing, Allamakee County, in the 1870s and 1880s.  Was part of a partnership as Houghton & Powell, and this partnership probably produced the stereographs.

     The name of this photographer was supplied by the NSA.

 

PRATT, F. W.

     Pratt had a studio in Des Moines, Polk County, in the 1880s.  Was in partnership as James & Pratt, and a stereograph from this partnership exists in the SHSI collection.

 

 

back to top

 

 

R

 

READ

     Read's studio was in Osceola, Clarke County.  Was in partnership as Smith and Read and stereographs probably came from this partnership.

     The name of this photographer was supplied by the NSA.  They thought he worked during the 1870s and 1880s.

 

READ, LUTHER B.

       Read had a studio in Waterloo, Black Hawk County.  He had a partnership as Hoot & Read.  Stereographs produced probably came from this partnership.  He was also, according to Burgess, in Waverly in 1897 and Ames in 1892.

       The name of this photographer was supplied by the NSA.  They thought he worked in Waterloo in the 1870s and 1880s.

 

REED, JAMES H. (1836–?)

       Reed had a studio in Clinton, Clinton County, in the 1870s through the 1890s.  He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as a Clinton photographer.

       From the History of Clinton County, Iowa , 1879, p. 689:  “James H. Reed, photograph artist, Fifth Avenue.  He was born in Joliet, Illinois, Jan 26, 1836 and was educated in Galesburg and Fulton, Illinois, to which latter place his family moved in 1838.  He is a photographic artist of unusual ability, and is a leading member of the National Photographic Association of the United States. He has been more or less identified with the interests of Clinton from its foundation to the present time, part of the time making his home just across the river in Fulton, Illinois, but for the past seven years a permanent resident of Clinton.  He married Miss Anna A. Pomeroy, of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, on the 25th of February 1871 and has two children - Mabel W. and Ralph; his family are members and regular attendants of the Protestant Episcopal Church. He was a poor man when he commenced business with a borrowed capital of $300 and is now worth from $15,000 to $20,000 with unlimited credit.”

       According to a pamphlet created by the Clinton County Historical Society: “The city directories give some fascinating material about these people.  Here is an example of an account about J. H. Reed.  ‘Mr. Reed is not only the proprietor of an elegantly appointed studio, but is above all a most thorough and accomplished artist, and produces pictures that for perfectness of style and finish can be excelled nowhere.  We quote from a neighboring sheet:  Mr. Reed is an artist quick to discern possibilities in posing, and showing judgment in this respect his work is not a mere likeness but a picture, or, in other words, a work showing harmony in its composition, beauty in finish, and truth in its outlines.’”

       There are eleven examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.  He also used backlists, one of which was called “Views of Clinton and Vicinity” and had 25 views, ten that were taken from the Water Works Tower.  Reed also published “View of Clinton, Iowa,”a series of views of Clinton in the mid-1880s which form a panorama when the accordion folded booklet is opened.  The booklet is in the SHSI collection.

 

RELF BROTHERS

       The Relf Brothers has a studio in Decorah, Winneshiek County.  Based upon interview by Heidi Larson:  James T. Relf was born in 1847 and died in 1909.  He was in business with his brother Will Relf and Arthur McKay from 1870 to 1880.  Relf Brothers and McKay shared a gallery that was located on Water Street upstairs over the drug store of J. H. Montgomery & Co. J. T. Relf went into business for himself around 1880.  His granddaughter, Janice Relf, states that his studio was located in the Relf building, which was built by J. T. Relf's father.  The Relf building was and still is (in 1995) located next to Amundson's clothing store on Water Street.  J. T. Relf split his time between building houses and photography.  Janice Relf said he helped build several different houses around Decorah and he helped build several houses around the First Lutheran Church area.  Two years before J. T. Relf died he took pictures of the dismantling of the courthouse in 1903.

       An article by James Shaffer In the 1968 winter issue of the Iowan, pp. 19–20, gives a brief story about the dismantling of the courthouse in 1903 and a brief story of James R. Relf's life.  Relf Bros. is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as a Decorah photographic firm.

       There is an example of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.  Darrah also saw one.

 

REUVERS, J. H.

       Reuvers had a studio in Pella, Marion County, in the 1880s and the 1890s.  Partnership called Reuvers & Scarff produced stereographs.  Burgess lists the name as Reuver and lists partnership as Reuver & Gesman in the 1880s in Pella.  Was also possibly in New Sharon in 1884 and Marion in 1880–1882.  He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as a Pella photographer.

       A stereo of this photographer's work has been seen in a private collection and a possible photograph of the exterior of his studio exists.

 

REYNOLDS, ALBERT CLINTON

       Reynolds and his brother, Francis (Frank) Marion Reynolds, had a studio in Harlan (1880-1884) and Griswold (1880s), both of which probably produced stereographs as the Reynolds Brothers.  He may have also been in Des Moines (1879).  Albert Clinton Reynolds later moved to Goodland, Kansas, and continued in the photography business.

       There is an example of the work of the Reynolds Brothers (Harlan) in the SHSI collection.

 

REYNOLDS, BARTLEY J. (1853–1927)

       Reynolds had a studio in Decorah, Winneshiek County, from about 1892 until 1917. His gallery, called the Star Gallery, was located at 113 W. Water Street (Ben Bear Block).  Reynolds' pictures of famous Decorah land sites such as Dug Way, appear in the book Picturesque Decorah which was published by the Decorah Public Opinion newspaper in 1899.  He was buried at Phelps Cemetery.

       From the Decorah Journal, March 16, 1927: “B. J. Reynolds, the veteran photographer of Decorah, died suddenly at his home on East Main Street, Decorah, yesterday, afternoon, March 15, 1927 at about 5 o'clock.  Mrs. Reynolds had come up town with him.  He seemed uncommonly tired.  When they reached -home he sat down in the dining room and Mrs. Reynolds got him a glass of milk.  He drank it and remarked, ‘My, that was good.’  Then raised his head erect and died. ...

       “Bartley J. Reynolds was born April 17, 1853, at Clarington, Pennsylvania.  He worked in a lumber camp there till he was 26 years old and then he moved to Minnesota and was in partnership with his uncle in a pump works.

       “In 1885 in Decorah, he married Miss Frances Mather and the same year they went to Albert Lea, where Mr. Reynolds entered the photograph business.  In the early nineties [1892] they came to Decorah.  Mrs. Reynolds died in 1915.

       “On Oct. 17, 1917, in Buffalo, N.Y., he united in marriage with Mrs. Jane Robinson, who survives him.  He is survived also by two brothers, D. J. Reynolds, of Los Angeles, and Levi G., of Seattle, and one sister, Mrs. A.W. Cornwell, of Battle Creek, Michigan.

       “Mr. Reynolds was an honest, upright man, respected by this entire community, where he had lived, about 35 years.  He joined the Methodist church when a youth and remained a member till his death.  When he was a young man he was Sunday School superintendent back in Pennsylvania.   No views have been seen by this photographer.

 

REYNOLDS, FRANCIS (FRANK) MARION

       Had studio in Harlan, Shelby County, in the 1880s.  Was in partnership with his brother Albert as Reynolds & Co.  May have also had studios in Des Moines in 1879 and in Griswold.  From the History of Western Iowa, 1882, p. 423:  “Frank and Albert Reynolds, of the firm of Reynolds & Co. photographers, formerly of Keokuk County, Iowa; learned their trade at Des Moines, and came to Harlan in the spring of 1879.  Established business in Sept. 1889.  They occupy four rooms in Coenen's Block, on the second floor.  They make a specialty of copying and enlarging.”

       Frank Reynolds moved to David City, Nebraska, where he continued to be a photographer.  His favorite subject was his daughter, Zula Zong Reynolds Rising.  There is also a stereograph of the two brothers with other male siblings in a private collection.

       There is an example of the work of the Reynolds Brothers in the SHSI collection.  NSA also reports seeing pirated views by the Reynolds Brothers.

 

REYNOLDS, HUGH M.

       Reynold's studio was located in Alden, Hardin County.  He worked in the 1870s and 1880s.

       There are five examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.  One is a hand-tinted view of a large building, and the other is a view of a main street. He was later said to be in Lake Preston, Dakota Territory, in the 1880s.  He used some of his Alden mounts with images from Lake Preston.  One example of his work has a stamp sized photograph on the back of the mount.  It shows both Reynolds and his wife who probably worked with him.

 

RICE, H. B.

       Rice had a studio in Lovilia, Monroe County, in the 1880s.  One stereograph advertises that “Also, View of the Great Cyclone at Grinnell, Iowa,” was available.

       An example of the work of this photographer in the SHSI collection is a street scene.  NSA has seen one of “Main Street - Lovilia.”

 

RICH, JAMES E.

       Rich had a studio in Charles City, Floyd County, in the 1870s.  He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as a Charles City photographer.  Also is listed by Burgess as having a studio in Mason City and Osage in the 1890s.  One prominent series was entitled “Views on and About Okoboji and Spirit Lake.”

       From Floyd County Advocate, November 29, 1901:  “J. E. Rich, of the Rich Studio, is very seriously ill at his home in Mason City says the Times Herald.  About a week ago he was taken with the lung fever and while the attending physician has been able to check the fever serious stomach trouble has set in.  His son Roy who spends most of his time now on the road in the interest of the studio, is home and the best care possible is being given the patient.  His numerous old friends here hope for the speedy and complete recovery of the pioneer photographer of this section.”

       He is listed in Camp Franklin in 1862 and St. Charles in 1863–65 according to the Directory of Civil War Photographers.

       There are seven examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.  There is also a backlist for the Okoboji and Spirit Lake series with 36 views.  This is the same backlist and views used later by Harwood and Mooney, Charles City photographers.

       NSA lists “Views on & About Okoboji & Spirit Lakes” with back list, “Great Snow Blockade near Lawler - On the Iowa and Dakota Division of the N. and St. P. RR,” in 1873.  Also street scene in Charles City.

 

RITCHER, WILLIAM C.

       Little is known of this photographer.  He is listed in Sioux City city directory in 1889–90 as having a studio at 313 Pierce Street, and in the 1891–92 directory as being at 4th, northeast corner.

       The name of this photographer (they spelled Richer) was supplied by the NSA.  He worked in the late 1880s and early 1890s.

 

RIFENBURG, ALONZO G.

       Rifenburg was in a partnership at one time with W. F. Kilborn as W. F. Kilborn and Rifenburg in Cedar Rapids, Linn County, and stereographs were made from this partnership.  They called themselves portrait and landscape photographers.  According to Burgess, he worked in the 1870s in Cedar Rapids, Linn County.  Burgess also listed him as working in Hamburg, Fremont County, in the early 1880s.

       There are two examples of this photographer's work as W. F. Kilborn and Rifenburg in the SHSI collection.

 

ROBINSON

       This may have been an amateur.  He signed the back of the stereographs that have been seen.  One was the building that was the home of the grandmother of television personality Johnny Carson.  The views were probably made in Bedford, Taylor County.  Burgess does not list Robinson.

       An example of this photographer's work was seen in a private collection.  The name was inscribed on the back of the mount.

 

ROBLIN, FRANK F. (1854?–?)

       Roblin's studio was in Spirit Lake, Dickinson County, in the 1880s.  He is also listed by Burgess as being in Ackley in 1880–1882.  The 1880 federal census lists him in Ackley and being 26 years old.  He was married to Jane A., aged 20 with one daughter, Grace G., aged ten months.  His nativity is listed as Canada.  Jane was born in Illinois and the daughter was born in Iowa.  A series of his was “Spirit Lake and Vicinity.”  This had a backlist that listed 53 cards.  The backlist also states, “taken in 1883.”

       There are twenty-one examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.

 

ROOD, WM. J.

       Rood had a photo studio in Spencer, Clay County, in the 1880s.  Some also list him as William I. Rood

       There are six examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.

 

ROOT, SAMUEL (1820–1889)

       Root had a studio in Dubuque, Dubuque County, from 1857 to 1882.  Partnership with Cutter in the 1860s.  He advertised as “Photographer, Root's Gallery, Emporium of Stereoscopic Views, Sanford Block,” “Scenery in and Around Dubuque,” “Stereoscopic Views of Dubuque and Surrounding Scenery,” “Scenery on the Mississippi & Attributes,” and “Iowa Falls Scenery” were some of his series.  Most views are of city scenery, few rural, one street view showing photographer's gallery with large camera shaped advertising sign, view of hailstones dated 6/82.

       Root is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer.  His gallery was located at the northeast corner Main and 8th Streets, opposite Town Clock, Sanford Block.  The Dubuque Herald of May 27, 1887, says that A. McKenzie has purchased the Root Gallery.  Root was a brother of famous Philadelphia photographer, Marcus A. Root.

        From Dubuque Daily Times, March 15, 1889:  “SamueI Root of this city, drops dead at Rochester, New York. On Monday evening last Mr. Samuel Root of this city, died of apoplexy at the residence of his brother in law Martine Briggs in Rochester, New York.  Mr. Root had been in his usual health all day, and had been downtown once or twice.  In the evening after supper he was sitting in the parlor with his friends.  He arose stricken with apoplexy and fell to the floor, expiring immediately. Mr. Root was in the seventieth year of his age.  His body will be interred at Rochester, by the side of his late wife.  Mr. Root was a native of Ohio.  He studied photography in Philadelphia and after conducting a gallery in New York for some time, he came to Dubuque in 1857 and opened a gallery which he conducted until 1882 when he retired from business.  At the time of his retirement, he was the oldest photographer in the state.  He had in his possession dageurreotypes of Henry Clay, Bayard Taylor, Edwin Forrest, and other distinguished personages which he had taken.”

       From other sources compiled by Scott J. Reis, Loras College student:  “Samuel Root was a native of Ohio, born in 1820.  He grew to manhood in Ohio, and studied his profession three years in the city of Philadelphia.  He then formed a partnership with his brother, Marcus A., and opened a gallery at 363 Broadway, New York City, from 1849–1851.  From 1851 to 1857, he operated his own gallery.  During this time, he exhibited at the American Institute.  In 1850 he won a silver medal and gold medal, in 1851 a silver medal, and in 1852 for crayon daguerreotypes.  He also experimented with microphotography before selling his business in 1857 and moving to Dubuque.  Samuel Root is credited with taking many fine scenic photographs as well as portraits.  He is credited with taking the first picture of Jenny Lind, as well as pictures of Henry Clay, G. W. Curtis, Dr. Albery Barnes, Bayard Taylor, George M. Dallas, and Edwin Forest.  He is also credited with a portrait of David Dale Owens, which was engraved by E. P. Vollum; on wood by S. Wallin, for the Geographical Report of 1852 of Wisconsin, Iowa, and Minnesota.  He died of apoplexy in March 1889 while visiting his sister in law, Mrs. Briggs, at Rochester, New York.  Mr. Root was twice married, both wives preceding his to the grave.  He had one child, a son, who was killed in the war.”

       From Dubuque on the Mississippi, 1788–1988, p. 193:  “Samuel Root (1820–1889) younger brother of the more famous Marcus Root, was, like John Plumbe Jr., a Dubuquer who was a figure of national significance in the infancy of the art that seized hold of America in the 1840s and 1850s.  The Root Brothers were from Ohio but first made their reputation in New York City.  After three years in Philadelphia, Samuel became a partner with his brother Marcus Aurelius from 1849–51 in a gallery in New York City and then operated his own gallery there until 1857 when he came to Dubuque, where he spent the remaining 32 years of his life.  His first wife died young, and his only son died in the Civil War.  In 1856 he married Harriety Furman, a minister's daughter, in Rochester, New York. They had no children.  For ten years his gallery and their home in Dubuque were on the southeast corner of 8th and Main Streets. Then he moved across the street in to H. W. Sanford's building, probably in the back of the second floor on 8th street, with a private entrance. The Roots, evidently enjoying some prosperity, then moved into a house on the northeast corner of 17th and Main Streets, just as the area was beginning to fill up.  Samuel Root's success came from a happy combination of factors.  He was a skillful photographer, who was able to perceive new trends and profit from them.  He made daguerreotypes for lithographers as well as for individuals and was quick off the mark in developing a brisk business with his Emporium of Stereoscopic Views.  His earlier series, “Views of Dubuque and Vicinity,” from before 1867 were expanded after his move into the Sanford Block to a series, “Scenery on the Mississippi and Tributaries.”  Some of the more popular cards were probably marketed nationally, but others were outside views made to order.  Root had a dependable sense of humor and sense of occasion.  His faithful spotted dag appears almost as a hallmark in his stereographs.  Others were made by viewing the work form the gallery windows.  His talent for promoting the business never seemed to deteriorate into mere self-promotion.  There is a slim possibility that the Ephraim Cutter, who was a partner with him for a few years and who died in Dubuque, may be the handsome young E. Cutter, daguerreotyped by an unknown for the Yale yearbook in 1851.  Root died of a heart attack while visiting his sister-in-law in Rochester, New York.  Appropriately, but by coincidence, he lies buried in Rochester, which became the world capital of photography.”

       There are fifty-nine views by Root in the SHSI collection.  They represent all of his famous series.

 

ROTH, E. H.

       Roth had a studio in Strawberry Point, Clayton County, in the early 1900s.  Made curved mount stereographs.  Burgess does not list him.

       There are three examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.  One of the views in the SHSI collection shows the nearby town of Volga.

 

back to top

 

S

 

SAMSON, WILLIAM H. (1831–1885)

       Samson had a studio in Osage, Mitchell County, from the 1860s to the 1880s.  Also, according to Burgess, there was a Mrs. Lou C. (Mrs. W. H.) Samson in Osage1880.

       From obituary in the Osage News, September 3, 1885:  “Died, Samson - At his home in Osage, Thursday afternoon August 27, 1885, of consumption, Wm. H. Samson, aged 54 years.  He was born in Brattleboro, Vermont, April 26, 1831. In 1871, he came to Osage and engaged in the photograph business. Eight years ago, he went to Texas on account of poor health where for a time he found relief but experiencing a rapid decline in health, he returned to Osage about six weeks ago. The funeral took place at his residence on Friday.”

       From History of Mitchell and Worth Counties, Iowa, 1884, p. 410:  “William H. Samson, photographer of Osage, was born in Brattleboro, Vermont, April 16, 1832.  His parents were Nathaniel and Lydia (Fisher) Samson.  William H. was raised upon a farm. He attended Brattleboro Academy and spent one year in Williams College, when his eyes failed and he was obliged to abandon his school. He was married in his native town October 22, 1855 to Lue C. Cobleigh, a daughter of Williard and Sybil (McClain) Cobleigh.  She was born in Brattleboro, Vermont, January 11, 1835.  Mr. and Mrs. Samson were the parents of six children, four of whom are living - Frank, Georgia, Clarence J. and Sumner M.  In 1855 Mr. Samson came to Iowa and settled at Dyersville, where himself and wife were employed as teachers in the graded schools, remaining for three years.  They then spent one year in their native place, and returned to Iowa. locating in Dubuque.  The following year they settled at Waterloo, and three years later they came to Osage, where they have since followed the business of photography.  Mr. and Mrs. Samson are members of the Congregational Church.”

       According to the Directory of Civil War Photographers, he was in Dyersville in 1865.  He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as a Osage photographer. The skylight in his building may still be visible in Osage. There is an example of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.  Darrah also recorded one.  He was also in partnership with Corning as Samson & Corning.  There is also one view from this partnership in the SHSI collection.

 

SANDERS, A. M.

       Sanders had a studio in Silver Lake, Worth County.  Burgess lists a partnership of Logue & Sanders in Fertile, Worth County, in 1895.  One view by Sanders, not the partnership, is in the SHSI collection.

 

SAYRE, JOHN S.

       Sayre had a studio in Des Moines, Polk County, in the 1870s and 1880s.  He was in partnership under the name Sayre and Tulburt.  He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer.  NSA says that he was also in Ashland, Kentucky.  (Name sometimes found as Sayres; also in partnership with Gaige in Ashland, 1870s–1880s.)  He issued several series all with backlists.  “Iowa and Other Views” “Chattaroi R.R.” back list with 100, Peach Orchard coal mines, Richmond, Big Sandy River, Chattaroi camp ground, etc.  “Ashland & Vicinity” scenery, city/rural; 4 views of Four Mile Wreck, 76.  Most seen are original but also issued scarce pirated scenery, genre, Pat Hoolahan's wake, New York City, Yosemite, $10 for fifty views or $3 a dozen.

       There are three examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.  One shows a large steer, named H. B. Varnum, weight 2810 pounds.. There is also a backlist with 45 views, some from Des Moines but others from throughout the world.

 

SCARFF

       Scarff had a studio in Pella, Marion County.  Was in partnership as Scarff & Neff and Reuvers & Scarff.  Burgess does not list this photographer but a private collector has a Reuvers & Scarff view.  The SHSI has one stereo that is imprinted with Scarff’s name alone.

 

SCHAUB, OTTO

       Schaub had a studio in Des Moines, Polk County, in the 1870s and 1880s.  He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as a Des Moines photographer.

       The name of this photographer was supplied by the NSA.  Reported to have made rare views of local scenery.  Had partnership as Schaub & Peterson in the 1870s according to Burgess.

 

SCHMIDT, HARRY

       Schmidt had a studio in Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie County, in the 1880s and 1890s.  A single view was reported by NSA, that of a baby in posing chair.

 

SCHMITT

       Schmitt had a studio in Osage, Mitchell County.  Also, according to Burgess, he had a studio in Waterloo.  Was in partnership as Scott & Schmitt and views were probably by this partnership.

       The name of this photographer was supplied by the NSA. They thought he worked during the 1860s.

 

SCHOOLEY, LYDIA A. (1839–1923)

       Lydia Schooley had a studio in Indianola, Warren County from 1879 to 1897+ according to Burgess.  She may have lived from Oct. 5, 1839 to June 5, 1923.  From the History of Warren County from Earliest Settlement to 1908, p. 773:  “In 1861 Mr. Schooley was married to Miss Lydia A. Gochnaur, who was born in Columbiana County, Ohio, in 1839 and was the daughter of Elkeny and Elizabeth (Crumbacker) Gochnaur, the former of German descent and the latter of English and German ancestry.  Her father was an architect and died in Ohio, after which his widow came to Iowa in 1867 and passed away in Winterset. They had two children.  Unto Mr. and Mrs. Schooley were born six children; Leila May, the wife of John T. McNaught, a blacksmith of lndianola; Mignonette, who became the wife of Charles N. Hurd, a mechanical engineer and electrician of California; Charles M. deceased; and Emma V., a trained nurse residing at home.  Both Mr. and Mrs. Schooley were members of the United Presbyterian Church.”

       The biography of Charles W. Zarley in the History of Warren County, Iowa, 1879, p. 604, states:  “When his school days were over he took up the study of photography under the direction of Mrs. Schooley (ca. 1886).”  She is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as an Indianola photographer.

       There is an example of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection. It shows a main street in town.

 

SCHOONMAKER

       He had a partnership with Hill (Schoonmaker & Hill) in Burlington, Des Moines County, and stereographs probably came from this partnership.  Burgess does not list.

 

SCHOONOVER, MR. AND MRS. L. W.

       This couple had a studio in Vinton, Benton County, in the 1880s.

       There are three examples of this couple's work in the SHSI collection.

 

SCOTT. WALTER

   Walter Scott made stereographs in Keokuk, Lee County, in the 1890s or early 1900s.  He may have been an amateur and used a stamp on the reverse of the views.  There are several in the SHSI collections.

 

SCOTT, URIAH

       Scott had a studio in Osage, Mitchell County.  Was in partnership as Scott & Schmitt and stereographs probably came from this partnership.  Had studio in Waterloo, Black Hawk County, in the 1860s and 1870s.  Studio called Union Gallery at West 4th and Commercial, and photo is available at Grout Museum.  Waterloo city directories cite Union Gallery with Mrs. E. Case in 1866, Scott & Greenwood in 1864, and in 1870, Scott & Schmitt over Anderson & Cutts store.

       The name of this photographer was supplied by the NSA.  A view reported by Darrah of Scott & Schmitt.

 

SHANAFELT

       Shanafelt had a studio in Sigourney, Keokuk County, in the 1870s and 1880s.  A view was recorded by Darrah.  Burgess also lists him but with no dates.

 

SHAW, DAVID C.

       Shaw had a studio in Maquoketa, Jackson County, in the 1870s and 1880s called Shaw's Gallery.

       There are four examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.

 

back to top

 

SHEAR, S. R. (1832–?)

       Had studio in New Hampton, Chickasaw County, 1875–1880.  Was in Decorah and Ossian, Winneshiek County, 1880.  Had partnership in New Hampton called Adams and Shear.  There was a Reuben H. Shear in New Hampton in 1880.  Burgess does not list a Shear in Decorah.  A prominent series was “Stereoscopic Views of New Hampton and Vicinity.”  He is mentioned in A. T. Andreas Illustrated Historical Atlas of the State of Iowa, 1875, p. 517, as being a photographer in Chickasaw County, New Hampton township.  Residence at that time was New Hampton.  His nativity was Chemung County, New York and he came to Iowa in 1856.  The History of Chickasaw and Howard Counties Iowa, 1883, p. 510, states:  “S. R. Shear, photographer, was born in Chemung County, New York, in 1832 and is a son of R. L. and Mary A. Shear, the former a native of Canada, the latter of New York. In 1845 he came to Lake County, Indiana, where he lived eleven years.  In 1856 he moved to Winneshiek County, Iowa, remaining there until 1869 when he came to New Hampton and engaged in business as above.  Married Jane E. Miller, a native of Wisconsin, and they have five children, Edgar M., Allen, Millie A., Ida M. and Ethel P.”  Is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as being in New Hampton.

       The name of this photographer as Adams & Shear in Decorah in the 1860s was supplied by the NSA.  There is one example of this photographer's work in New Hampton in the SHSI collection.

 

SHEPARD, F.

       Little information is available on this photographer.  His studio was in Iowa Falls, Hardin County.

       The name of this photographer was supplied by the NSA (Darrah).  They thought he worked in the 1870s.  Burgess also lists him but with no dates.

 

SHERIDAN, CHARLES H.

       Sheridan had a studio in Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie County, in the 1870s through the 1890s.  He issued local stereoviews.  He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as a Council Bluffs photographer.

       There are seven examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.

 

SIMMONS, VELLAS L. (1855–1926)

       Simmons had a studio in Waterloo, Black Hawk County, in the 1880s and 1890s.  Had partnerships as Simmons & Latier and Simmons, Latier & King.  Prominent series of views of building the Chicago Great Western railroad bridge in 1887 between 6th and 7th street.  Further description is available at the Grout Museum.  May have also worked in West Liberty from 1895–1899+.  First name is sometimes spelled Villas.  City directories indicate he was born in Illinois in 1855 and came to Waterloo in 1883.  In 1886 in business with LaTier and King on E. 4th between Water & Sycamore. In 1899 at 225 1/2 E. 4th and 1901–1902 at 516 1/2 Lafayette with L. E. Carson.

       There are fifteen examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.  Thirteen are by Simmons & Latier, and two are by Simmons, Latier and King.

 

SLOCUM, ORVILLE W.

       Slocum had a studio in Clear Lake, Cerro Gordo County, in the 1880s.  Also had studio in Nora Springs, Floyd County.  There was a S. Slocum in Clear Lake in 1874.  Some report that Slocum was the older brother of the wife of Mather, another Clear Lake photographer.  He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as a Clear Lake photographer.  While in Nora Springs, he was in parternship as Holbrook and Slocum.

       There are five examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection when he was in Nora Springs (as Holbrook & Slocum) and twenty-two from his time in Clear Lake (as Orville W. Slocum).

 

SMITH, DWIGHT

       Smith had a studio in Hopkinton, Delaware County, in the early 1900s.  He used the curved mount format for local views.

       There are fifteen examples of the work of this photographer in the SHSI collection.

 

SMITH, SYLVESTER

       Smith had a studio in DeWitt, Clinton County.  There is a stereoview of his waiting room in the studio.  He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as a DeWitt photographer.

       There are three Smith views in the SHSI collection.

 

SMITH, WILLIAM H.

       Smith was in Osceola, Clarke County in the 1860s.  He had a partnership as Smith and Read and stereographs probably came from this partnership.  There was also a Harry Smith in Osceola 1891–1899.

       The name of this photographer was supplied by the NSA. They thought he worked during the 1870s and 1880s and produced local views and views of people.

 

SMITH, WILLIARD M.

       Smith had a studio in Ottumwa, Wapello County in the 1880s.  He had a partnership as Green and Smith and views came from this partnership.

       The name of this photographer was supplied by the NSA.

 

SORENSEN, CLAUS

       Sorensen had a studio in Cedar Falls, Black Hawk County, in the 1880s and the 1890s.  References in the Historical Record of Cedar Falls, 1893, p. 47, state:  “The first ambrotype gallery started in Cedar Falls was by H. Walton in 1859.  The oldest artist running a gallery at this time [1893] is C. Sorensen, whose rooms were opened by D. C. Williams in 1862. There are now three gallaries operated by C. Sorensen, Carl Atherton and Veach & Bull.”  Sorensen is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as a Cedar Falls photographer.  There is one stereograph by Sorensen in the SHSI collection.

       This photographer's name was supplied by the NSA.

 

SPEAKE, J. G.

   Speake was located in Vinton, Benton County.  It is not know how long he was in the city as many later views are of Broken Bow, Nebraska.  There are two views by Speake in the SHSI collection including a view of his photography car in Riverside, Washington County.

 

SPERRY, GEORGE

       Sperry had a studio in Iowa City, Johnson County.  Burgess lists a Eliza Sperry, a Harry S. Sperry, and a George Sperry, all part of the firm of George Sperry & Co. in the 1870s and 1880s in Iowa City. George Sperry is listed in Iowa City in the 1881 Gazetteer.

       There are three examples of the work of this photographer in the SHSI collection.

 

STALLINGS, W. F.

       Stallings had a studio in Grinnell, Poweshiek County, in the 1880s.  Later he may have been in Des Moines, according to Burgess.

       An example of this photographer's work has been seen in a private collection and there is also an example in the SHSI collection.

 

STARKS, M. W. (1851–?)

       Starks had a studio in Sioux City, Woodbury County, in the 1880s and 1890s.  This was called the Genelli Photograph Gallery and may have been a photographic chain out of St. Louis.  From History of the Counties of Woodbury and Plymouth, Iowa, 1890–1891, p. 855:  “M. W. Starks, photographer, Sioux City, was born in Bradford, Lee County, Illinois, in December 1851, a son of Charles F. and Rachel (Hulbert) Starks who were natives of Pennsylvania.  In 1872, he engaged as an apprentice in photography, which business he has since followed.  In October, 1883, he came from St. Louis to Sioux City, and opened the Genelli Gallery, and has been successful in building up the largest trade in the city, and has a reputation for fine work throughout the adjoining town.  Mr. Starks was married in January 1884 to Miss Hattie I. Harvey, daughter of Leonard and Cornelia (Whittlesey) Harvey, living in Kendall County, Illinois.  One son, Henry Harvey, born June 13, 1887, is their only child. Mr. Starks is a member of Sioux Lodge, No. 14, K of P [Knights of Phythias].”

       The name of this photographer (they spelled Stark) was supplied by the NSA (Darrah).

 

STAUNTON, EDWIN A.

       Staunton is listed in Davenport city directories as having a studio at 312 Brady in the 1870s.  Also listed at 219 W. Fifteenth from 1884–1907.  He advertised as being Davenport, Rock Island, and Moline.

       The name of this photographer was supplied by the NSA and there is also one view in the SHSI collection.

 

STREUSER, MATHIAS J.

       Streuser had a studio in Bellevue, Jackson County, in the 1870s and1880s.  He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as a Bellevue photographer.

       Stereographs by this photographer have been seen in private collections, one a city bird’s eye view and one a river scene.

 

STUBBS

       Stubbs had a studio in Storm Lake, Buena Vista County in the 1880s and 1890s.  There is one view by him in the SHSI collection.  Called Stubbs & Co. according to Burgess.

 

STUBBS, C. J.

       Had studio in Marshalltown, Marshall County, in the 1880s.  Had partnership as Stubbs & Gammack and views may have come from this partnership.  There was also a Stubbs in Storm Lake in the 1880s (relationship unknown).

       The name of this photographer was supplied by the NSA.  He was reported to have made rare views of local scenery.

 

SUSONG, JOSEPH D.

       Susong had a studio in Des Moines, Polk County, during the 1880s and 1890s.  Also listed by Burgess are Mrs. Lydia Susong 1891+ and Warren S. Susong 1892–1899, both in Des Moines.

       There are four examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.

 

SWARTZ, ADAM

       Swartz had a studio in Stuart, Guthrie County, in the 1870s through the 1890s.  A single view was reported by the NSA that of a young girl on rug. He is also listed by Burgess.  He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as a Stuart photographer.

 

back to top

 

 

T

 

TEWKSBURY, JOSEPH R. (1831–?)

       Tewksbury had a studio in Fort Madison, Lee County, in the 1870s through the 1890s.  Studio was located on Front Street.  In Fort Madison Illustrated, 1887, p. 65, he advertised:  “As my residence and gallery join, I am always ready for work, and owning them pay no rent; with all the instruments and stock that plenty of means and fifteen years' experience can provide, I am well prepared to serve an appreciative public with all the various styles of pictures at the lowest possible rates.  Views (all styles) of this city, Nauvoo, and Bluff Park Camp Ground, at 2 cents each.”  On page 56 of the same publication, “J. R. Tewskbury, on Front, west of Market, has a finely stocked studio.  He does photographing, enlarging and solar work, and is prepared to do work in all branches of the business.  With all modern apparatus his work is made as fine as the finest.”

       From History of Lee County, Iowa, 1879, pp. 753–754:  “Tewksbury, J. R. photograph artist, born in New Hampshire, near Concord May 17, 1831; his parents who were from Tewsbury, England, removed to Western New York, where he was brought up.  He came to Iowa in 1854; in April 1856 he opened the first railroad ticket office in Keokuk; he held the position of General Western Agent of the C.B. and Q.R.R. [Chicago, Burlington and Quincy railroad] for six years, went across the plains to Idaho and Montana; was engaged in fruit culture in Southern Illinois; was in business in New York City, then returned to Iowa and was engaged in photographing at Farmington for eight years, and established the business here in the fall of 1875.  He married Miss E. Carrie Grubb May 27, 1856; she is a native of McConnelsville, Morgan County, Ohio; her father Walter Grubb came to Iowa in 1841 and was an old settler; he was Postmaster at Farmington for many years.”  In Portrait and Biographical Album of Lee County, 1887, pp. 374–375:  “Joseph R. Tewksbury, photographer, is one of the most skillful artists of Fort Madison, and is carrying on a successful business.  He is a native of the Old Granite State, having been born near Concord, May 17, 1831. He is a son of William and Content (Chapman) Tewsbury, natives of New Hampshire and New York respectively.  The great-grandparents of our subject came from Tewsbury, England.  While Joseph R. was yet an infant his parents removed to Livingston County, New York, where our subject received a good common school education and developed into manhood. He then went to New York City, became an expert stenographer, and subsequently kept books for a wholesale grocery in Rochester.  Not being quite satisfied with his condition or prospects in the East, he joined a company who were about to emigrate to Kansas, and they arrived there in time to vote at the election of the first Territorial officers.  There was too much disturbance, however, in that portion of the Union to suit Mr. Tewksbury and he accordingly retraced his steps as far as the Mississippi River and located at Keokuk, where he served for a time as local editor and financier of a newspaper.  In the winter of 1855, Mr. Tewksbury entered the employ of the C.B. and Q.R.R. and in the following spring became their general western agent at Keokuk.  In this capacity he sold the first railroad ticket in Keokuk.  He was connected with this company for about six years, but the confinement indoors becoming injurious to his health, he decided to obtain more active occupation, and consequently became engaged in nursery and fruit growing at Hamilton, Illinois.  In 1864 an excellent position was proffered him by a railroad company at Omaha and he went thither to accept.  Upon his arrival, however, he found a large number of the people greatly excited in regard to the discovery of gold and silver in Idaho and Montana, and so instead of accepting the situation offered him he concluded to join the general rush westward.  He had considerable money with him, and being a shrewd financier was always ready to avail himself of an opportunity to make more.  He therefore, instead of buying a ticket across the plains, purchased two span of mules and a wagon, and started out with his own conveyance, at the same time carrying with him five passengers, each of whom paid him $100 in advance. They headed for Virginia City, Montana, and also visited Idaho.  Mr. Tewksbury was pleased with this section of country and concluded to locate here.  He turned about to go East for his family, but on his way back found that the Indians were very troublesome, and therefore concluded to remain in the East.  Mr. Tewksbury now bought a twelve years lease on a fruit farm in southern Illinois, and made a purchase of land. This he sold out in August 1866 and visited New York City, investigating a patent right.  In the space of three months he found his cash account increased by several thousand dollars, and he then became Secretary and Financial Agent for a Joint Stock Manfacturing Company, with a capital stock of $300,000 and held this position two years.  In the winter of 1868–69, Mr. T. returned to Iowa, located at Farmington and engaged in the clock, jewelry, and photograph business.  He operated this until 1876 when leaving an assistant in charge of his business at Farmington, Mr. T. went to Fort Madison and established his present business.  Everything worked successfully, and he then sold out his business at Farmington.  Besides his property in Fort Madison, he owns a photograph gallery at Nauvoo, Ill., and is accumulating a competence.  Joseph R. Tewksbury and Miss E. C. Grubb were united in marriage May 27, 1856 in Farmington, Iowa.  Mrs. T. is a native of Ohio, having been born at McConnelsville, Morgan County, in 1831.  Her father, Walter W. Grubb, came to Iowa in 1841 and was for many years postmaster at Farmington.  Of this union there were born two children, twin girls, one of whom died in infancy, the one living is Carrie, now the wife of L. C. Pike, a wholesale boot and shoe dealer of Chicago.  Mr. T. is a gentleman of more than ordinary intelligence, and wherever he has been was at once recognized as a man fitted to become a leader in the community.  He has had a large experience in business matters, and has met with very fair success in the various enterprises in which he has been engaged.  He has declined some responsible positions, among them that of General Ticket Agent of the Keokuk and Des Moines Valley Railroad.  He is extremely gentlemanly and courteous in his demeanor, and appears to be eminently fitted for the peculiar and delicate business in which he is now engaged.  As an artist he is a gentleman of fine tastes and original ideas and his gallery is fitted up in an exceedingly elegant manner, and is the resort of the best class of citizens in Fort Madison.”

       Is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer.  Had studio in Farmington, Van Buren County, in the 1860s and 1870s.  Burgess also lists a R. W. Tewksbury and a Mrs. E.C. Tewksbury (1895+) in Fort Madison.  Darrah has also seen view by him when he was in Farmington.

       There are eight examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.  The backs feature a unique stamp, a description of Bluff Park, a backlist, the officers of the Iowa State Penitentiary, or a description of Black Hawk Watch Tower.

 

TEWKSBURY, R. W.

       He had a studio in Farmington, Van Buren County.  Unsure of his relationship with J. R. Tewksbury.

       The name of this photographer was supplied by the NSA.  They thought he worked in the 1870s.  NSA says he was also recorded as Tewkesbury.  Views rare (5), two of church, two of cemetery, one of home & family group in yard.  There is one view by the Farmington studio in the SHSI collection but it is by J. R. Tewksbury but shows a Farmington address so J. R. and R. W. may be related in so way.

 

THOMAS, GEORGE L.

       Thomas had a studio in Columbus Junction, Louisa County, in the 1860s through the 1890s. Was in a partnership called Thomas & Orr.  Views were probably made by this partnership.  There was a G. S. Thomas in Columbus City in 1865 and a G. L. Thomas in Washington in 1865 according to the Directory of Civil War Photographers.  The name of this photographer was supplied by the NSA (Darrah).

 

THOMAS, J. W.

       Thomas had a studio in Lansing, Allemakee County, in the 1870s.  His name was reported by NSA.  A single view reported, of First National Bank.  Burgess does not list him as a photographer.

 

THORNBURG, E. R.

       Thornburg was in Ames, Story County, probably in the early 1900s.  His address was listed as Sta. A, Ames, Iowa.

       There are twelve views by of this photographer’s work in the SHSI collection but collectors have seen over a hundred examples of his work.  Many other areas of central Iowa were photographed by Thornburg with some work as late as 1912.  He did numerous views of Iowa State University.

 

TIERNEY, H.

       Little is known about this photographer.  He had a studio in Clinton, Clinton County.  He is also listed by Burgess.

       The name of this photographer was supplied by the NSA (Darrah).  They thought he had worked in the 1870s.

 

TOWNSEND, ISRAEL L. (1839–1921)

       Had studio in Iowa Falls, Hardin County, in the 1880s.  Prominent series was “Iowa Falls and Vicinity.”  He was the older brother of Timothy W. Townsend of Iowa City.  There is also, according to Burgess, a James A. Townsend (his son) in Iowa Falls in 1887.  James is also listed in the Cedar Falls directory.  From History of Hardin County, Iowa, 1883, p. 773:  “Mr. Townsend, in 1861, at Indianapolis, Indiana, married Miss Mary J. Yount, and they now have two children - James A. and Clara.”  Had studio in West Branch, Cedar County.

       According to the Directory of Civil War Photographers, there was a J. S. Townsend in Johnson County in 1865, a Townsend & Kilburn (Kilbourn) in Muscatine in 1865, and a Townsend & Bro. in Johnson County in 1865.

       There were examples of this photographer's work in the West Branch historical museum, taken when he was a West Branch photographer and also five in the SHSI collection.  In addition, there are also twenty-nine examples of the work of this photographer while in Iowa Falls in the SHSI collection. There is also a view showing his address as West Branch.  All have backlists.

 

TOWNSEND, JAMES ARTHUR

       He had a studio in Iowa Falls, Hardin County, in the 1870s and 1880s.  Went by the name Arthur.  Used the same backlists as his father, Israel L. Townsend, but some do bear his name rather than that of his father.

       NSA says “Iowa Falls & Vicinity” backlists but most are the same views as listed by Israel L. Townsend.

 

TOWNSEND, LEWIS M.

       Townsend was in West Liberty, Muscatine County, in the 1880s.  He was also was in Muscatine in 1891–92, according to Burgess.  May have been part of the Townsend family from Iowa City, West Branch, and Iowa Falls.  According to the Directory of Civil War Photographers, there was a Townsend & Kilburn (Kilbourn) in Muscatine in 1865.

       There is one example of the work of this photographer in the SHSI collection.

 

TOWNSEND, TIMOTHY WESLEY (1844–1912)

       Townsend had a studio in Iowa City, Johnson County in the 1870s through the 1890s. Prominent series:  “Gems of Clear Lake” and “Views of Iowa City and Vicinity.”  Older brother was I. L. Townsend of Iowa Falls.  Studio was on second floor of northeast corner of Washington and Clinton Streets.  May have also had studios in West Liberty 1864-70+ according to Burgess and Muscatine (1891+).

       Leading Events in Johnson County Iowa History, 1913, pp. 907–909, states:  “Timothy Wesley Townsend, having as a heritage the sturdiness of his pioneer parents, Mr. T. W. Townsend not only became a leader in his chosen profession of photography but his entire life was in accordance with the influence and benediction of his early Christian home.  T. W. Townsend was born April 11, 1844, at Frederick Grove, King's County, Ohio.  His parents, James and Susannah (Rogers) Townsend, were both natives of Ohio and were strong abolitionists and deeply in sympathy with the cause of the African slave.  Their Ohio home was one of the stations on what was known as the Underground Railroad over which the escaping negro was conducted on his way to freedom in Canada.  After leaving Ohio and coming to Iowa their pioneer home in that state was one of the stopping places for John Brown and his men.  They were kind and generous hearted people and highly esteemed by all who knew them.  Our subject was twenty years of age when he first engaged in the photographic business at West Liberty, Iowa.  Later he established the Townsend Studios at Iowa City and Des Moines, Iowa, which he conducted very successfully for many years.  Mr. Townsend was married January 4, 1866 at Muscatine, Iowa, to Miss Anna Coover, daughter of Isaac and Anna Wilhelmina Coover, both natives of Ohio.  To them were born two sons:  Alva Coover Townsend, born in Iowa City, January 25, 1872, residence in Lincoln, Nebraska, and Charles Fremont Townsend, born in Iowa City, July 1, 1874, residence in Des Moines, Iowa.  Both sons are engaged in the photographic art.  Born of Quaker parentage who were devout members of the Friend's Church, our subject later in life became associated with the M. E. church.”

       Listed in the 1881 Gazetteer.  According to the Directory of Civil War Photographers, there was a Townsend & Bro. in Johnson County in 1865, a Townsend & Kilburn in Muscatine in 1865, and a J. S. Townsend in Johnson County in 1864.

       There are 120 examples of the work of this photographer in the SHSI collection and a caricature of Townsend in his studio published in Our Live Ones.  He was one of Iowa’s most prolific photographers of stereographs.

 

TROTH, W. H.

       Little is known of this photographer.  His studio was in Hampton, Franklin County.  He may have been William Troth who died in 1880.  He is thought to have worked in 1870s and 1880s.

       There are eight examples of the work of this photographer in the SHSI collection.

 

TURLBURT

       Tulburt had a studio in Des Moines, Polk County.  He was in partnership under the name Sayre and Tulburt.  Burgess does not list him.

 

TURNER, ELMER E.

       Turner's studio was in Rockford, Floyd County, in the 1880s. The Story of Rockford, 1970, p. 179, states:  “a small building which in an early day was Elmer E. Turner's photograph gallery, then located across the street west on the site of the first National Bank Building (Roger Fullerton's hardware in 1988).”  He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as a Rockford photographer.

       There are four examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.

 

TWIFORD, ARCHIBALD

       Twiford was in a partnership as Twiford and Twining, which existed in the 1860s in Burlington, Des Moines County.  A view in the SHSl collection is from this partnership.  Burgess lists the partnership as existed as late as 1879 and also mentions a Bryan and Twiford in Burlington in 1874-1875.

 

TWINING, H. N. (M)

       Twining had a studio in Burlington, Des Moines County, in the 1860s.  He was in a partnership with Archibald Twiford in the spring of 1865 and the views were from this partnership.  Used a backlist.  Back of card (in addition to the backlist) says “Such as Houses or Barns, large or for stereoscopes.  Leave orders at C. W. Williamson's, No. 308, Jefferson Street, Burlington, Iowa.”  Also says “For sale at Book Stores and Eggleston's News Depot.”  Was in Burlington in 1864–65 according to the Directory of Civil War Photographers.

       There is one example of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection as the partnership.

 

back to top

 

 

V

 

VOSBURGH, MARTIN H.

       Vosburgh had a studio in Charles City, Floyd County, in the 1890s.

       From the History of Mitchell and Worth Counties, Iowa, vol.2, 1918, pp. 321–322:  “Martin H. Vosburgh, who since 1910 has conducted a photographic studio in Osage, was born in Columbus, Wisconsin, in 1861, a son of Orric and Mary (Holmes) Vosburgh.  The father, a native of New York, was born October 24, 1816, and his life record covered the intervening years to March, 1906, so that he was in his ninetieth year when he was called to the home beyond.  The greater part of his life was spent at Columbus, Wisconsin, and he devoted his time and energies to general farming, to fruit farming and to the conduct and operation of a stone quarry.  His wife, who was also born in the Empire State, her natal year being 1826, passed away in December 1906.  They were the parents of eleven children, of whom six are yet living; James and Edgar, who are residents of Connecticut; Mrs. Mathew Williams, living at Staples, Minnesota; Frank, of Chicago; George, who is located at Columbus, Wisconsin; and Martin H. of this review.  Those who have passed away are Henry, Charles, William, Cornelia, and Everett.  The father was a staunch Republican in his political views.  In the district schools of Wisconsin, Martin H. Vosburgh acquired his early education and remained with his parents until he attained his majority.  He took up the study of photography in 1883 and establishing his first gallery at Columbus, Wisconsin, after spending four years in learning the business under the direction of W. K. Hosken.  In the latter part of 1887 he began operating independently along the line of his chosen life work and for a year thereafter remained in Columbus.  He then removed to Beaver Dam, Wisconsin, where he spent two years, conducting a photographic studio, and in the spring of 1890 he removed to Charles City, Iowa, where he remained for eleven years.  He next located at Whitewater, Wisconsin, where he remained in business for nine months and through the succeeding six months he was located at West Allison, Wisconsin.  He then removed to Austin, Minnesota, where he carried on business for nine years, and in 1910 came to Osage, where he purchased the gallery of J. A. Douglas, who had been a well known photographer of this city for twenty three years.  Mr. Vosburgh has modern equipment and utilizes the most progressive methods of photography.  He has recently refitted and enlarged his place to meet modern day conditions and the demands of his patrons and he has now one of the best galleries in this part of the county.  He is intensely interested in his profession and keeps in touch with all the latest improvements, which are being made.  In 1887 Mr. Vosburgh was united in marriage to Miss Myrta Davis, of Wisconsin, who was born at Fox Lake, that state, December 31, 1867, a daughter of James and Emma (Tibbets) Davis.  Her father was a mechanic.  Her mother is still living.  To Mr. and Mrs. Vosburgh have been born two children; Harold, who was born December 24, 1891, and is now a practicing physician located at Pipestone, Minnesota, and Max who was born in Austin, Minnesota, in 1904. Mr. Vosburgh gives his political allegiance to the Republican Party and has served as a member of the school board, of which for two terms he was president.  He belongs to the Knights of Pythias Lodge at Osage, to the Knights of the Maccabees and the Yeoman and in the last named organization is a past secretary and foreman.  While never neglectful of public interests and duties, his activities, nevertheless, center on his profession and his work shows him to be a worthy exponent of all that is latest and best in the art of photography.”

       Burgess lists a Vosburgh & Townsend in Charles City and also a Vosburgh's Gallery (1890s).

       The NSA supplied this photographer’s name.

 

 

 

back to top

 

 

W

 

WAIT, GEORGE S.

       Wait had a studio in Sioux City, Woodbury County, in the 1890s.  He was in partnership as Brown & Wait and views came from this partnership.  A prominent series was “Corn Palace Views.”  Brown & Wait first listed in city directory in 1890–91 at 413 4th.  Also in same location in 1891–92.

       There is one example of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection as the partnership.

 

WALDRON, GEORGE F.

       Waldron had a studio in Marion, Linn County, in the 1880s.  He had a partnership as Waldron & Wilson.  Their prominent series was “Views of Bellevue, Iowa, and Vicinity.”  He is also listed, by Burgess, in Keokuk in 1889.

       There are eleven examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection, all by Waldron & Wilson and all of the Bellevue series.  A backlist is included on several of the cards.

 

WALKER, CHARLES L.

       Walker had a studio in Grinnell, Poweshiek County.  He may have been Charles L. who died June 25, 1900.

       The NSA (Darrah) supplied the name of this photographer.  They thought he worked in the 1870s and 1880s.

 

WALLINE, ANDREW LARSON

       Walline had a studio in Gowrie, Webster County, in the early 1900s.  He used a curved mount format.  He may have also worked in Des Moines.  From the Gowrie News, May 7, 1936:  “A. L. Walline, Gowrie photographer and prominent member of the Congregational Church here several years ago, died Monday morning in a hospital at Hampton, where he had been a patient since January 17.  Mr. Walline moved from Gowrie twelve years ago to open a photo studio in Clarion.  Funeral services will be held here this afternoon with the Rev. W. L. Patterson of the Methodist Church in charge.  Andrew Larson Walline was born in Willinge Malmohus Lan, on November 27, 1865, and was baptized the same year.  He learned the cabinet making trade and worked at that trade after coming to the United States in 1888 and locating in Des Moines.  While working in Des Moines he attended night school and became a naturalized citizen at that time.  Later taking up the photographic business, he conducted studios at Harcourt, Stratford, Boxhold, Ogden, and Gowrie.  He was united in marriage to Miss Anna Dahl of Harcourt on January 16, 1898 and they made their home in Gowrie.  To this union three sons were born; Lawrence who died in 1916; Paul, of Crookson Minnesota; and John of Hampton.  Surviving Mr. Walline are his sons, Paul and John, and a granddaughter, Phyllis Walline, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Walline.”

       There are ten examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.  Several are of towns near Gowrie.  Some are Sweden views, pirated comic or views from Eastern states.

 

WALTER, HARVEY L. (1833–?)

       Walter had a studio in Manchester, Delaware County, in the 1870s, 1880s, and 1890s.  Had partnership as Walter & Weidman, but there are no known stereographs from this partnership.  From the History of Delaware County, 1878, p. 594:  “Walter & Weidman, photographers, over Ford Bros. store on Franklin Street.  Harvey L. Walter, senior partner of the firm, was born in Fayette County, Ohio, July 5, 1833.  Came to the West in 1853; married Mary A. Fuller in 1864. Came to Manchester in 1871.  Have two children.”

       There is one example of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.

 

WARNER, PETER H.

       Warner's studio was in Hopkinton, Delaware County, in the 1860s.  Also listed in Sand Spring (1865) and in Mt. Vernon (1865) by Burgess.  According to the Directory of Civil War Photographers, there was a S. K. Warner in Hopkinton in 1863–64 (listed as a photographer and retail liquor dealer).

       The NSA supplied the name of this photographer.

 

WARRINGTON, A. W.

       Warrington had a studio in Oskaloosa, Mahaska County in the 1860s through 1880s.  A prominent series was “Grinnell Cyclone Views.”  He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as an Oskaloosa photographer.

       There is one example of the work of this photographer in the SHSI collection.  It is of the Grinnell tornado and shows another photographer in the view.

 

WASHBURN, W. W.

       Washburn had his studio in Cresco, Howard County, in the 1870s and 1880s.  NSA reports he made rare views of local scenery.  He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as a Cresco photographer.

       There is one example of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.  It is an interior view of the Grace Church on Easter morning in 1878.

 

WEBB, JULIUS FRANK

       Webb had a studio in Strawberry Point, Clayton County, in the 1880s.  He was later was in Coon Rapids (1889–1895) and Shell Rock (1896–1897).  There was also a John F. in Coon Rapids in the 1890s.  Stereos by this photographer had been seen by collectors.

 

WEED, TYLER E.

       Weed's studio was at 312 3rd Ave. West in Cedar Rapids, Linn County, during the 1890s.

       There is an example of this photographers work in the SHSI collection.

 

WETHERBY, ISAAC A.

       Wetherby was one of the earliest photographers in Iowa City, Johnson County.  Ad in the Iowa State Press, December 4, 1867, reads:  “Among the many fine signs, of the times and otherwise, that are to be seen on Clinton Street, Wetherby's new one is most prominent.  It is a painting of a lady, in a great oval frame, and certainly for a painting of that kind it is a masterpiece.  Wetherby's gallery has the reputation, justly acquired, of being the best in the state.  He is an artist of no mean powers, as the many works of his brush will testify, while as a photographer he has no superior in the west.  His large photos colored in oil are positively matchless.”  According to the Directory of Civil War Photographers, J. A. Wetherby was in Fremont in 1864 and in Johnson County in 1864.  Listed as Weatherby & Co. and other names.  Burgess also lists Isaac Weatherby (note her spelling) in Rock Valley in the late 1890s.  Also Weatherby & Son in the same locale.  Also a Weatherby & Jenison in Rock Rapids in 1887.  Charles C. is the son's name.

       There is a probable example of the work of this photographer in the SHSI collection.

 

back to top

 

 

WHITE

    White was in partnership and produced views as Hastings, White & Fisher in Davenport, Scott County.  They possibly worked in the late 1870s and 1880s.  There is one view by this partnership in the SHSI collection.

 

WHITING

       Whiting had a studio in Boone, Boone County, in the 1870s.  His mount showed the town to be Montana, an early name for a portion of the town of Boone.  Burgess lists other Whitings in northwest Iowa in the 1890s but it is unknown if any relationships exist.  There are five examples of his work in the SHSI collection, all showing street scenes of the city of Boone.

 

WIGGINS, SILAS T. (1831–1908)

       Wiggins had a studio in Cedar Rapids, Linn County, during the 1870s through the 1890s.  It was at one time located at 44 2nd Avenue.  History of Linn County, Iowa, vol. 2, 1911, pp. 233–234, reads:  “Silas T. Wiggins, deceased, came to Cedar Rapids in 1876, and for a number of years was a leading photographer here.  He was born July 21, 1831, in Bangor, Maine, and his life covered the intervening years to the 21 of January 1908.  On leaving New England he made his way westward to Fall City, Wisconsin, in company with his parents, Elijah and Matilda (Blodgett) Wiggins.  The father was a farmer by occupation and after his removal to the Badger State continued to reside there throughout his remaining days.  He was one of the first of the family to seek a home in the Middle West.  His wife also continued to reside in Wisconsin until called to her final home and both were laid to rest in the cemetery at Fall City.  On the 12th of May, 1870, Mr. Wiggins was united in marriage to Miss Laura A. Ritchie.  Mr. Wiggins held membership in the Episcopal Church and was prominent in Masonry.  His own life was an exemplification of many sterling traits of character and thus an honorable career was ended when on the 21st of January, 1908, he passed away.”

       NSA says series include “Views of Cedar Rapids & Vicinity.”  NSA also identifies him as having made stereos in Winona, MN.  He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as a Cedar Rapids photographer.  There are sixteen examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.

 

WILKIN

       Wilkin had a studio in Nashua, Chickasaw County.  Gallery called the Star Gallery.  Partnership of Gilbert & Wilkin.  Burgess lists a Minard A. Wilkin in Charles City in the 1880s.  She also lists Gilbert & Wilkins (note “s”) in Nashua.  The views seen, however, are by Gilbert & Wilkin.  Also an Art Wilkins in Charles City.

       There are four examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection, all made by the partnership.

 

WILKINS, G. T.

       This may be the same man who was with Gilbert in Nashua.  Wilkins had a studio in Charles City, Floyd County.  NSA says he was also in Clinton (1880).  Burgess lists a George P. in Clinton in 1880.

       The NSA (Darrah) supplied this photographer’s name.  They thought he worked in the 1870s and 1880s.

 

WILLIAMS, BUTLER S.

       Williams had a studio in Manson, Calhoun County, in the 1870s and 1880s.

       There are four examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.

 

WILSON, FRED (?–1934?)

       Little is known of this photographer.  He worked in Gravity, Taylor County, in the 1880s.  May have died in August 30, 1934.  NSA says he issued rare local scenery, some pirated of other areas.

       There is an example of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection that is probably from Iowa and several others that are pirated views.

 

WILSON, JOHN C. (?-1908)

       In Cherokee Leader of July 6, 1876, ad mentions the address as being, “Rooms west of Empire House.”  Ad in Orange City De Volksriend of June 20, 1874, says (in Dutch) that J. C. Wilson will be in LeMars every other month during the summer of 1874.

       From the History of Western Iowa, 1882, p. 283:  “J. C. Wilson, photographer, (copying and enlarging a specialty), was born in Ottawa, Canada, in 1848; moved to Ogdensburg, N.Y., in 1862, and came to Cherokee, Ia., in 1870, being one of its earliest settlers; has served as a member of the city council two years.  He married Carrie L. Bates, of Durand, Ill., and has one child, Bessie M.”

       From the 1870-1970 centennial issue of the Cherokee Daily Times:  (1872-1874) “Johnny Wilson started this gallery on Maple Street several years ago.  His skylight was shattered by hail last summer, but he is again photographing young and old in the latest style.  He specializes in babies pictures.”  Also (1881-1882) “Johnny Wilson, our photographer, has erected a very handsome two story building on Second Street, a half block south of Main.  On the West side of the street, just south of the alley.  It is a boon to Second and an ornament to the city.  A fine skylight illuminates the gallery at the rear of the second floor, where Wilson also has a reception and dressing room.  The front part will be leased for a private office.  The first floor is a fine store space.”

       NSA has him listed as J. W. Wilson, working in the 1870s, issued rare local stereoviews, details unknown.  Burgess lists from 1870 to 1890.

 

WILSON, WILLIAM M.

       Had studio in Marion, Linn County, in the 1880s.  Had partnership as Waldron & Wilson.  Prominent series was “Views of Bellevue, Iowa.”  Is also listed, by Burgess, in Keokuk in 1889.

       There are eleven examples of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.  All are by Waldron & Wilson and all are of Bellevue.  A backlist is included on one of the cards with numbers to 24 and calls Bellevue “Iowa's Summer Home.”

 

WILTSE, JEROME

       Wiltse had a studio in Osage, Mitchell County, in the 1880s.  Was in partnership as Fox & Wiltse.

       There is an example of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.  It is by the partnership of Fox & Wiltse.

 

WINSLOW, L. B.

       Winslow had a studio in Osage, Mitchell County.  He was also in Charles City in 1891–92.  Was in partnership as Winslow & Oliver in Charles City.  Stereographs possibly came from this partnership.

       The NSA (Darrah) supplied the name of this photographer.  They thought he worked during the 1870s and 1880s.

 

WISE, SAMUEL H. (1842–1924)

       Wise had a studio in Wilton, Muscatine County, in the 1860s through the 1890s.  According to the Wilton Advocate, February 14, 1924, which includes a photo of Wise:  “He was born in Cedar County, Iowa, on October 24, 1842.  At age seventeen, he went to Colorado where, for a year and a half, he prospected for gold.  He served with Company G 35th Iowa Infantry as a musician in the Civil War.  In 1866 he took up photography and worked for one year in West Liberty, Iowa.  Following his marriage in 1866 to Mary Ellen Healy, he opened a photograph gallery in Wilton Junction, Iowa, in 1868.  Later he combined this with a jewelry store but was in the same location for fifty years.  He had five children.  After an illness of several months due to hardening of the arteries, he died at age 81 on February 10, 1924.”

       From History of Muscatine County, Iowa, vol. 2, 1911, pp. 409–410:  Few men of Muscatine County saw more of the vicissitudes of life in their earlier years than Samuel H. Wise, of Wilton Junction.  As a gold hunter and later as a soldier in the trying times of the Civil War, he passed through experiences that he can never forget and that had an important effect in molding his character.  He is a native of Iowa, having been born in Cedar County, October 24, 1842.  His parents were Henry and Sophia (Kester) Wise, both of whom were natives of Union County, Pennsylvania.  They emigrated to Ohio in 1829 and came to Cedar County, this state, in 1839.  Mr. Wise built a log cabin on a farm which he selected as his home and subsequently erected the first flouring mill that was built in Cedar County, hauling the lumber from Muscatine with two yoke of oxen.  This mill he operated until his death, which occurred in 1856.  The mother died in 1881.  There were 13 children in the family, seven of whom are now living.  On the 30th of November, 1866, [Samuel] Wise was united in marriage to Miss Mary E. Healy, who was born in Muscatine County in 1845, a daughter of Abiel and Mary (Adams) Healy, both of whom were natives of Massachusetts.  They came to Muscatine County in 1836 and continued here during the remainder of their lives.  Mrs. Wise is a member of a family of ten children, five of whom are now living.  She was one of the popular schoolteachers of this region in her young womanhood.  To Mr. and Mrs. Wise, five children have been born.  Mary. S, the wife of Dr. George E. Zinn of Homing, Oklahoma, Edwin A. of Chicago, George C., professor of languages in Salt Lake City, Utah, Ida E., wife of Rev. P. M. Conant, of Marion County, Iowa, and Samuel A., a jeweler of Mitchell, South Dakota.  Mr. Wise cast his first vote for Abraham Lincoln as president of the United States and has never seen any reason for changing his political allegiance, being a stanch supporter of the principles of the Republican Party.  Fraternally he is identified with Lodge No. 167, AF and AM, and the Grand Army Post No 250 of Wilton Junction and has filled all the chairs in the first named organization.  He has led an active and useful life and has little cause for regret when he looks back over his career.  His prosperity is the result of his own labors, and he receives the respect due those who have faithfully attempted to perform their duty.”

       He is listed in the 1881 Gazetteer as a Wilton photographer.

       There is an example of this photographer's work in the SHSI collection.  It is of the Star drugstore.

 

WOOLLEY, H. M.

   Woolley made views in Traer, Tama County.  He made local views and two examples of his work are in the SHSI collection.

 

WYER

       Wyer had a studio in Decorah, Winneshiek County.  Had partnership as Hover & Wyer and views came from this partnership.  Their prominent series was “Views in and About Decorah, Iowa.”

       There are nine examples of this photographer's work in my collection.  Backlists are on many of their stereographs and number to 30.

 

back to top

 

 

Y

 

 

YOUNG, EDWARD S.

       Young had a studio in Leon, Decatur County, in the 1880s.  There was also a E. S. Young in Cedar Rapids in 1876 and in Lewis in 1884–1887 according to Burgess.

       The NSA (Darrah) supplied the name of this photographer.  They thought he worked in the 1870s.

 

YOUNG, JOHN W.

       Young had a studio in Clinton, Clinton County, in the 1880s.  He had a partnership at one time called, Hildreth, Young, & Co. and views probably came from this partnership.  There was also a Lucy in Clinton at about the same time and a John Young in Clarence and Mechanicsville in the late 1890s.

       The NSA supplied the name of this photographer.  They thought this partnership was in the 1870s and 1880s.

 

YOUNG, O.F.

       According to Burgess, Obediah F. Young was in Scranton in Greene Country in 1882.  The stereographs by O. F. Young, however, have been of Sheldon in O’Brien County.  He may have moved there following his stay in Scranton.  Two views have been seen and another is in the SHSI collection.