project
 

TOOLS

     

Facts and stats

 
 


Preservation Pencil is used to direct moisture vapor where you want it - and a temperature you want, from cool to hot mist. A great tool for removing animal glue, adhesive tapes, separating paper layers, delining, stain removal and cleaning and relaxing of paper and textiles.

“Bone” Folders are used for creasing, rubbing down, hand support with weight distribution and weighting surfaces.


Micro Spatulas are used to lift fibers and apply adhesives to hard-to-reach places


Tweezers are used for accuracy in probing, holding and arranging fiber fragments, and maneuvering and positioning. The comfort grip eases repetitive motion and reduces dependence on finger pressure.

 

 

 


Micro Scissors are great for detailed work. The slender, stainless steel precision cutting blades enable easy removal of stitches.

Dahlia Sprayers creates a fine, consistent mist used in relaxing fibers.

Nilfisk Vacuum is a powerful, lightweight, portable vacuum with a special four-stage filtration system that captures ultra-fine dust particles.

Particulate Chambers and Filters are used to collect and store the smallest particles removed from surfaces. Particles can be analyzed to determine the use and environmental history of the flags.

 

On average, it takes up to 240 hours and $4800.00 to stabilize a flag.

Up to 4000 stitches per side are individually cut to remove damaging gauze from the capitol flags.

Four known conservation treatments: 1894, 1904, c. 1920s, and 1977.

Stabilization generally takes 8 weeks.

Conservation takes 12 to 14 weeks.

There are between 7 and 114 rows of machine stitching across the field from the 1894 and 1904 treatments.

SPI range from 2 to 22
The most common materials used: wool, cotton, silk, and pigment.

The most unusual thing found on a flag was a section of wallpaper with a red strawberry on it.

The standard size for a government issued infantry flag is 6.5’ x 6.5’

Hand repairs appear below the 1894, 1904 and c. 1920s conservation treatments. There is also evidence of fray ends being trimmed.